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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 07-25-2011, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lt1silverhawk
A rookie like me would have immediately fallen for the "expensive must be better" mentality.


If you can't invest in a larger lathe the little 9x20 can make for a decent learning tool and you can make some useful parts on it, it also has a large following and because of this actually holds it's value surprisingly well. Check out this site dedicated to the very common basic 9x20 sold by various suppliers. This guy goes into detail about what you need to know before buying and describes some simple mods that greatly increase the versatility of this little machine,

http://bedair.org/9x20.html

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 07-25-2011, 05:09 PM
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Hey JohnnyK81,
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyK81
However, since the times have changed, it's probably worth your while to get one that doesn't involve moving a belt to change speeds!
If you don't mind, I'd like to know more about this belt-moving deal. What is the better alternate?




Hey oldred,
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
If you can't invest in a larger lathe the little 9x20 can make for a decent learning tool and you can make some useful parts on it, it also has a large following and because of this actually holds it's value surprisingly well. Check out this site dedicated to the very common basic 9x20 sold by various suppliers. This guy goes into detail about what you need to know before buying and describes some simple mods that greatly increase the versatility of this little machine,

http://bedair.org/9x20.html
Sweet! I wouldn't mind buying a used one now to play with before deciding on a larger, permanent one. Maybe make a few things or rent it out to raise the funds while I'm at it.
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Old 07-25-2011, 05:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyK81
We have an older Taiwanese lathe that is IDENTICAL to this Jet


The Taiwanese machines are also sold under different names, including that JET and other larger Jet models, and are a cut above the ones from mainland China but then they are priced accordingly-your Taiwan machine is most likely better quality than most common Chinese outfits. The 14x40 Birmingham I mentioned, the YCL, is the common Chinese model sold under various names including HF's "Central Machinery" and Birmingham has a different much more expensive Taiwanese 14x40 lathe that has little in common with the Chinese version. Those Chinese machines are decent however, at least the 12x36 and larger models, and I certainly have gotten good service from mine. It has been used daily doing some heavy duty service making mining machinery parts for three years now and so far has been very accurate and zero trouble, it would make an excellent hobby machine that would cover any hobby type needs.
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Old 07-25-2011, 07:48 PM
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Mine, if I recall, before my time, was used a lot for gunsmithing.. And at some point, made it's way into my parents garage.. Could use a tune up, but it seems like decent equipment (Of course, coming from semi-competent machinists such as myself, maybe it's great, who knows)! It sure could use a carriage lock though. I see no mention of one in the schematics (Hand drawn schematics.. With some poor english as well.. But still, lots of perfectly hand drawn schematics.. It's kind of entertaining, and useful).

By belt, I mean, in that picture, you can see the top lifts off on a hinge. You then move belts on a pulleys to adjust the spindle speed.

There is also 2 sets of gearing you can use, by pulling out a lock and moving a lever.. I assume this is what they refer to as 'back geared'.. Correct me if I'm wrong Oldred.. I have studied compressed air, not machining.

The alternative you asked about is most lathes you see now (I believe? Haven't really shopped for one) have a quick change gearbox on the front with levers to change the speeds.. I suppose it's more convenient. I also assume there are no belts, but I could be mistaken.

And on a side note oldred, is a backgeared (if that's what this is) lathe considered good, bad, obsolete, etc? (Right now it's just a lathe covered in bondo dust.. sigh).
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Old 07-26-2011, 02:06 AM
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I realize the I want it now factor, but just keep watching CL. You will find a suitable machine at the price you are willing to pay. Like we have been saying, a 12 x 36 would be the absolute minimum I would consider purchasing. You will find out real soon the limitations of the smaller machines. Then you will be kicking yourself. I agree with "new interiors", a lathe is like a shop, it' never big enough. One other thought, I am a member of Home Shop Machinist forum, you may want to consider poking around there. A machine may come up that is a little far for you to drive for a look see, but a friendly request may get a member to take a look at if for ya. Plus, the members are very knowledgeable. Hope I didn't break any rules naming another forum.


Keith
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Old 07-26-2011, 06:12 AM
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Thanks for the info Keith, I will be heading over to the Home Shop Machinists to take a looksee.

Best regards,

Steve
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Old 07-26-2011, 08:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyK81
There is also 2 sets of gearing you can use, by pulling out a lock and moving a lever.. I assume this is what they refer to as 'back geared'..

, is a backgeared (if that's what this is) lathe considered good, bad, obsolete, etc? (Right now it's just a lathe covered in bondo dust.. sigh).


You got it although the true term "backgear" is somewhat outdated on newer design machines. In fact there was a 3 page friendly disagreement over on a home machinist forum a couple of years ago about exactly what a backgear is on modern lathes (it's quite clear what it is on old designs) but basically just think of it as a low range. In the case of a modern design belt drive lathe it's a set of gears that allows a a lower range for the belt set thus allowing for both lower speeds and a wider selection of speeds.
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:09 AM
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as in most tool purchases, bigger is better. you will soon find the limitations of a 20'' bed, probably on your first attempt to use it. a 20'' lathe is measure sans chuck, with a chuck your down to 16''. 14x40 would be ideal, though you will find limitations on that too.

another thought is tooling. without tooling you can't do jack with a lathe. 3 jaw & 4 jaw chucks, centers, tool holders and cutters; all cost a proverbial arm and a leg.

until the recent retirement of my machine shop owner buddy, i had access to machine tools. small and big stuff too, 10 ft lathes, milling machines, cnc and manual... and an endless supply of his stock room, boy do i miss that.

if your looking at a $1500 budget, buy a welder, drill press and bandsaw first. you can't get enough lathe for that price.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 07-27-2011, 12:22 PM
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Hey ogre,
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre
as in most tool purchases, bigger is better. you will soon find the limitations of a 20'' bed, probably on your first attempt to use it. a 20'' lathe is measure sans chuck, with a chuck your down to 16''. 14x40 would be ideal, though you will find limitations on that too.
Glad you brought up the size being affected by the chuck. For those of use who have not done any metal work or used a lathe, would you or any other members be able to give us an idea of what common parts can or can't be made due to size limitations? I think that would help us newbies get a better perspective of not just limitations, but why the larger one is ideal.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre
another thought is tooling. without tooling you can't do jack with a lathe. 3 jaw & 4 jaw chucks, centers, tool holders and cutters; all cost a proverbial arm and a leg.
If and when I decide to invest in a lathe, I will be on the look out for one that comes with the tooling. Used ones listed for sale sometimes include the accessories.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre
if your looking at a $1500 budget, buy a welder, drill press and bandsaw first. you can't get enough lathe for that price.
That's a very interesting way of putting it. Not to go off topic, but I did see a metal-cutting bandsaw at Harbor Freight this past weekend. Never really thought about what I could use it for but now that you have mentioned it, I'll start researching that as well. The drill press is something that has been in the back of my mind for a while, but never got serious about it. I did score the cheapo Habor Freight flux wire welder and a stick welder for $20 each from a friend so I could at least start learning how to do welds. Hopefully a Lincoln in the future.


Thanks!
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Old 07-27-2011, 03:33 PM
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Apparently the metal horizontal bandsaw from HF is pretty decent!
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Old 07-27-2011, 04:22 PM
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saw

check northern tool I bought one where the head swivels instead of the vice like most have had it 8 years works great
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Old 07-27-2011, 10:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lt1silverhawk
For those of use who have not done any metal work or used a lathe, would you or any other members be able to give us an idea of what common parts can or can't be made due to size limitations?
actually i can't see any reason to buy a lathe to build a hotrod.
i've made many parts on a lathe, but none for my truk.
i did have my drive shaft modified on a lathe, but it was a monster.


as for a bandsaw: unless your building a frame, same thing. no reason to have one.
and even then you could get by with a grinder with a cut off wheel.

a good welder and a couple of grinders is all you need for most metal work on a hotrod
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Old 07-28-2011, 06:46 AM
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Thanks lt1silverhawk for the Tips and Recommendations.
My little brother is planning to buy the Metal lathe,I will share your informative post with him.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 07-28-2011, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre
...actually i can't see any reason to buy a lathe to build a hotrod.
Gotta agree. I bought a lathe thinking it would be indespensable for scratch building...and I have never ever used it. I'll be Craig's Listing it in the near future just to get it out of may way.

If the hobbyist doesn't already have them, I would say to top your "To Buy" list with a very good Mig welder, a good drill press, a good compressor, an assortment of air tools (grinders, cut off wheels etc) and a 14" chop saw. A lathe, in my estimation, would be far far down my list of essential tools...if on the list at all.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 07-28-2011, 10:42 AM
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Man, I've used it a whole bunch for my mustang. From making adapters to fit rotors onto axles, to aesthetic things such as making an aluminum shift handle and round knob.
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