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Old 12-14-2004, 01:43 PM
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Mig to Tig conversion?

Hey all,

Normally I'd post this question at the MetalMeet site, but they seem to be down, and I'm not sure when/if they'll be back up.

So here is my question. I've got a small Mig welder, and I've got this issue that I'm trying to work out that the guy at the welding supply says needs a Tig welder. Being about 2g's short of a Tig welder at this point I'm looking for cheapo solutions.

I seems to me that the big difference between mig and tig is the whole wire feed aspect. Couldn't I just take the copper nozzle out of my tig welder gun and replace it with a tungston needle and have myself a instant cheapo tig welder?

I assume that their must be a problem with this cause there has got to be a reason that mig welders are $500 and tig $2500. But I sure can't tease the problem out of the books that I've read on the subject. Just seems that everyone says tigs are better and cost more.

Thoughts?

B

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Old 12-14-2004, 07:30 PM
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There is really nothing similar between TIG and MIG welders.
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Old 12-14-2004, 10:12 PM
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http://www.turbomustangs.com/forums/...?threadid=8872

click on this it shows how to build a cheep tig welder.
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Old 12-16-2004, 04:04 PM
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MIG to TIG Conversion

I've got a MIG machine that I converted
to TIG operation, except that it doesn't have hi frequency for aluminum.

First, you have to have a "tig rig" which is the tig handle which holds the tungsten along with the argon shielding hose and electrical feed hookup combination.

I've got it written up in an excel file
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Old 12-24-2004, 11:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by goosesgarage
http://www.turbomustangs.com/forums/...?threadid=8872

click on this it shows how to build a cheep tig welder.
Guys, you all have to see this, its AWSOME!!!!!!! *runs out to his garage*

Last edited by Old School Nut; 12-24-2004 at 11:17 PM.
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Old 12-25-2004, 07:31 AM
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If you have the money? look around for a used econo tig (miller) you should be able to find one used for about $800 -1000 buckos. econo tigs work very well on aluminum!
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Old 12-25-2004, 01:43 PM
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Re: Mig to Tig conversion?

Quote:
Originally posted by Billy Boy
Hey all,

Normally I'd post this question at the MetalMeet site, but they seem to be down, and I'm not sure when/if they'll be back up.

So here is my question. I've got a small Mig welder, and I've got this issue that I'm trying to work out that the guy at the welding supply says needs a Tig welder. Being about 2g's short of a Tig welder at this point I'm looking for cheapo solutions.

I seems to me that the big difference between mig and tig is the whole wire feed aspect. Couldn't I just take the copper nozzle out of my tig welder gun and replace it with a tungston needle and have myself a instant cheapo tig welder?

I assume that their must be a problem with this cause there has got to be a reason that mig welders are $500 and tig $2500. But I sure can't tease the problem out of the books that I've read on the subject. Just seems that everyone says tigs are better and cost more.

Thoughts?

B
I made one for fun with my boy from a DC arc welder, we set up on dc and then we had an extra air cooled tig torch along with a argon bottle and regualtor I fired it up and tig welded. I used a copper plate near the weld to drag the tip accross to the weld area and it tiged fine. without the high frequency you need to have a scratch start. and no ac with out the HF so no alum but did work for the steel. I got my use and old miller tig for $750 300 amp 220volt single phase house current. Not as good as some of the newer stuff on aluminum but a great unit for everything else, stainless, copper and steel, does weld aluminium and have fixed many dirt bike and and al gas tank and other parts. Ed ke6bnlo
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Old 01-05-2006, 08:25 AM
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another thread

on another thread, Travis was showing us about how to make a gas operated tig, so try that, it just might work for you.
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Old 01-14-2006, 12:28 PM
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hey

As a certified TIG welder, I can say there is alot of difference in mig and tig machines...

Your best bet is an old buzz box DC stick welder, cheap...and you can throw a scratch start DC setup on there....good for carbon steel and stainless....

thats the only way your really gonna get tig welding for under $1000....even a used tig welding setup now a days, a low amprege, ac/dc machine...is nearly $1000 if not alot more...
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