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Old 02-04-2005, 11:41 AM
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Mig welding help

Can anyone suggest a good book or instructional video that teaches mig welding?

I just perchased a Hobart 115v, Handler 140 welder, and would like to have some type of training. I have been doing a lot of practicing, but would like a better understanding of the process.

I moved to So Cal to open a business and have nobody to show me the ropes.

Thanks in advance.

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Old 02-04-2005, 12:27 PM
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My Lincoln came with a short training video. Maybe they sell them separately.

Best place to become really dangerous is take a semester welding class @ your local JC. Calif has one about every block it seems. At least we pay enough taxes to build that many of the politicians didn't spend it all on re-election.
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Old 02-08-2005, 03:08 PM
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what kind of stuff are you working on?

i think the best way to learn is by doing. i bought a welder a couple years ago and have done a few jobs with it. after awhile you learn what is happening with your welds. when i first started i didn't have my welder set hot enough. you just have to experiment and learn as you go. there's different methods for different materials so you just have to keep at it and it will come to you.

JB

p.s. a course wouldn't hurt either.
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Old 02-08-2005, 05:30 PM
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You might want to check out the American welding society at www.aws.org good chance you will find what you need there?
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Old 02-11-2005, 03:30 AM
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Re: Mig welding help

Quote:
Originally posted by justbcuz
Can anyone suggest a good book or instructional video that teaches mig welding?

I just perchased a Hobart 115v, Handler 140 welder, and would like to have some type of training. I have been doing a lot of practicing, but would like a better understanding of the process.

I moved to So Cal to open a business and have nobody to show me the ropes.

Thanks in advance.
You moved to SoCal to start what kind of business? I'm not trying to put down your efforts or where your heart is, but do you honestly think that someone is going to show you how to run a business? It is something that you are going to have to work hard at and fall down a couple of times before you know what works and what doesn't. Now onto the welding questions. Are you doing sheetmetal work or heavier work like frames? If you are doing sheetmetal work, a 115v 140amp welder will do fine, but anything heavier like frames and suspensions, go for the extra $$ and buy a good 220v 180 and up amp welder. Do you have a gas hookup on the welder? Are you using the correct gas? Are you even using gas?
Honestly it sounds to me like you jumped into "starting your own business" a little too soon, most people hone their skills and turn their hobby into a business, not start a business doing something that you know nothing about and expect someone to show you how to do it. Regardless...Good Luck.
Later,
WEIMER
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Old 02-12-2005, 06:07 PM
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Re: Re: Mig welding help

Quote:
Originally posted by Weimer
You moved to SoCal to start what kind of business? I'm not trying to put down your efforts or where your heart is, but do you honestly think that someone is going to show you how to run a business? It is something that you are going to have to work hard at and fall down a couple of times before you know what works and what doesn't. Now onto the welding questions. Are you doing sheetmetal work or heavier work like frames? If you are doing sheetmetal work, a 115v 140amp welder will do fine, but anything heavier like frames and suspensions, go for the extra $$ and buy a good 220v 180 and up amp welder. Do you have a gas hookup on the welder? Are you using the correct gas? Are you even using gas?
Honestly it sounds to me like you jumped into "starting your own business" a little too soon, most people hone their skills and turn their hobby into a business, not start a business doing something that you know nothing about and expect someone to show you how to do it. Regardless...Good Luck.
Later,
WEIMER
Welding is just a hobby I am tying to learn, not my business.

I am in the lighting field. We sell and service all things emergency lighting related. Thanks for the concearn, but my business is doing fantastic, it is my welding that could use some pointers; and since I don't know anyone in the LA area to give me welding tips, I thought I would get a book. Sorry for the confusion.

Thanks for all the advice and tips.
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Old 02-12-2005, 08:12 PM
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I just took deliver of a new Millermatic 175 230v unit and it came with a short but very informative video. I am by no mens a welder, but I am learing by doing. Still trying to figure out if it's better to pull the weld or push it.

Vince
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Old 02-13-2005, 07:47 AM
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Check this out. http://www.millerwelds.com/education...llermatic.html
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Old 02-13-2005, 07:59 AM
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That is everyting that is on the demo tape I got with my system.

Vince
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Old 02-13-2005, 09:50 AM
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find a piece of scrap metal and practice welding. reset your adjustment dials while welding so weld sounds like eggs frying in a pan. after a while you'll get the hang of it.
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Old 02-13-2005, 10:01 AM
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A good refrence book is good but you will not learn to weld from that alone. Practice is the only way. Hit the junk and scrap yards and buy every metal type you can. Then start a log, metal type, thickness and settings. Aprox, travel speed did it work best to push or pull and what each setting did. Remember you can learn just as much from mistakes as success. Buy a few contact tips when you start aluminum because if you has a wire feed issue you will burn wire back into the tip. (they are only a buck each) After your weld is cool break it apart, put part in a vise and use a pipe wrench or such and break it. That way you can look at the weld, look for voids or pockets, areas that did not penetrate or areas that are different in color. Once you find what works and what does not you will have it in the book and always be able to reproduce the weld. I never have a weld that looks like the books, I think what they do is have a pro use the wrong setting and make a bad bead but he is still using a good tech and only showing 1 problem. Me I always had 50 problems so the book never showed what I did wrong. I fixed most of my problems step by step. Start with the machine setting then change 1 thing at a time. Don't make multipul setting changes because you will not know which worked.

I am not a great welder I can put stuff togther and make it look good but when I want to do a project I still need to buy extra so that I can practice. I wish I was disaplined enough to keep a log myself but as they say "stupid is as I do ". Any way that was how I was tought in H.S. many years ago.
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Old 02-13-2005, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by 302/Z28
Still trying to figure out if it's better to pull the weld or push it.
There are probably lots of opinions on this but I just had a professional welding buddy come over to my shop to give me some pointers on my (mig) welding. One of the first things he did was change my technique from a pull to a push - at least for horizontal welds (no push and no pull at all for a vertical weld). Net result - it changed my results dramatically once I got the hang of it (see the thread "got a welding coach" for some before and after pics). The best part is I can now see what the tip of my wire and my weld puddle are doing much better.

I certainly don't have the credentials to say that pushing is the best technique for everyone, but it sure made a huge difference for me.

Dewey
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Old 02-13-2005, 11:36 AM
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Miller has a 140+ page book titled Gas Metal Arc Welding that should be available from any of the Miller dealers. It has good info on the history and fundamentals of Mig welding. I also found that the local dealers ran a one day into course to Mig welding and that taught me were the on-off switch was and let me mess up their gear for the first time. After that hit the scrap pile like was suggested and practice, break, practice.......
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Old 02-13-2005, 12:09 PM
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I find I can lay a better bead by pulling on SS ans steel and by pushing on aluminum. A friend of mine pushes all the time and does a better job that way. I think a lot of it has to do with thechnique, the angle to the work and such. What works for one does not work for all so find what works for you. If you are getting a clean weld with good penetration the that is all that matters.
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Old 02-15-2005, 11:30 AM
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Wow! Thanks for all the information everyone. I have been doing a lot of practicing; just laying down beads and making minor adjustments as suggested. I am already making great progress, and I feel a lot more confident in my welds.

Thanks again,
Joey
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