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Old 09-17-2007, 12:18 PM
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Misting a spray booth

What is the current thinking of misting a spray booth with a bit of water to keep any dust down. I have seen pros and cons here and elsewhere about wetting down the floors and don't intend on getting that much water in my spray area. I'm talking using only a bottle with a hand sprayer, just to put a bit of weight on those elusive dust paticles so they stay on the floor or wall rather then suspended in the air when the spray gun starts to move the air around a bit. Too much humidity of course is not a good thing while spraying, but possibly just a bit might help. (I also ground my metal pieces at least to a piece of pipe in damp ground - and this seems to help some - I just don't like sanding dirt nibs )

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Old 09-17-2007, 02:52 PM
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Misting spray booth

We mist our PLASTIC HOMEMADE spray both with a hose. Wet down the plastic sides and floor, water works like a magnet,makes cleanup easy.
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Old 09-17-2007, 03:45 PM
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Plus, the water keeps the overspray and paint from sticking to the floor.
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Old 09-17-2007, 04:53 PM
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I've been thinking about this very question recently. This doesn't pertain to potential dust on the walls or ceilings, but what about spraying the floor with a high gloss paint before painting the car? I know a lot of the pros say don't wet down the floor with water because the moisture will remain in the air and can cause problems when spraying. But a coat of enamel on the floor would trap the dust and dirt temporarily and not have any water vapor to worry about.

Obviously, the paint will wear off later, but if you are not a stickler for a perfect looking floor, what's the down side?
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Old 09-17-2007, 06:36 PM
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Last time we were talking about this it got different replys because different parts of the country get more humidity than others and the evaporating water was causeing some blushing so it is gonna depend on where you are and the weather. I have used a waterfall here in Calif, a set up where water cascades down the booth walls drawing dust and airborne tid bits into it and away. Kinda like the breeze you feel when flushing a toliet while your still sitting there.

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Old 09-17-2007, 07:20 PM
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Mist water in a paint booth in Southeast Texas and it will evaporate before you can hook the air hose to your gun.....I tried it, it ain't worth the effort IMO.

Vince
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Old 09-17-2007, 07:58 PM
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Keep the hose running vince
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Old 09-17-2007, 08:23 PM
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Trash comes form the most likely of places that get overlooked IMO.
Most comes from the project itself due to hidden areas or simply not properly tacking the thing off. You'd be amazed at how many wipe down,blow it off and shoot it. Hate to tell ya,but it's still got fuzzies on it.
What you wear to spray with.
Dirty hose.
What are you test spraying on? Old test paper has millions of tiny particles just waiting for you to spray some air on.
Are you filtering your intake air on a negative pressure set up?
Is your "door" where the air flow will pull across the work?
I hose down my "booth" and any stands the day before with the fan on and let it dry out.
Like Vince said.I wet it down before I shoot and it's dry by the time I get ready to spray almost.
I've gone in and just shot paint without doing anything and had O trash.Goes back to the tacking thing.
I won't say wetting everything down won't help,but IMO the trash comes form simple,other places you just don't realize cause I've wet everything down and STILL had some of the worst trash issues ever till I got to "thinking" about "where" it was coming from. Everywhere but where I thought it was.
Heck, Just fog the room with clear BEFORE you spray. It will glue down anything able to fly.LOL... Yeah, I've done it.Tarp it with cheap plastic and soon as the o'spray is clear,pull the cover and shoot. Not much I haven't tried to elminate the dreaded nib.
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Old 09-17-2007, 11:53 PM
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I wet the booth floor down and outside the booth where the guy painting walks when he comes out.

I don't have much air flow going through the booth, if you would leave the service door open about 2 or 3 inches, the suction in the booth will close the door, if you left it over 6 inches, it wouldn't pull it closed.

Very little suction, and the booth has one stovepipe type inlet and outlet about 6 feet high.

So I have very little air movement going through the booth. If you look through the window, you will wonder how the guy painting can see, a lot of fumes, but he can see good, because he's next to it.

I put clean paper on the table where I mix the paint, clean the air hose with lacquer thinner, and rinse the walls and ceiling with a good spray of water, as soon as the ceiling stops dripping, I wet the floor down and then paint right away.

I tack rag the mixing table surface, the air hose, the spray gun and cup, the paper suit and hood the painter wears. Plus the usual tacking of whatever gets painted.

When the painter comes out of the booth, I have him come out slowly, and don't slam any doors in the shop.

No whipping the air hose around while painting, like everything is slow, or kind of slow.

I never have any dirt or fuzz in the paint, they come clean,

I really believe the slow movement of air through the booth helps this a lot.

If I had a downdraft, that would be a different story.

I also use supplied air, and the supplied air hose is cleaned with lacquer thinner and tacked down.

I would rather spend the time tacking everything up front, then dealing with nibs in the paint.

Anyway, this is what works for me.

Rob

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Old 09-18-2007, 06:59 AM
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Lots of good food for thought plus there are reminders of forgotten necessities for us amateurs.

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Old 09-18-2007, 07:25 AM
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I like to paint when it's raining, I don't get the dirt or bugs that way.
It's gets to 100% humidity and I get my best slickest paint jobs.
So I'll never believe the humidity is a problem.
(The Ford plant here in town has a waterfall in their paint both line)
It also prooves that most of the dirt comes from outside,
otherwise raining wouldn't make a difference.
Also, I've learned, the less exhaust air I run, the less dirt I get.
And I don't pull air directly across the car anymore-that
made a big difference too.
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Old 09-18-2007, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcclark
I like to paint when it's raining, I don't get the dirt or bugs that way.
It's gets to 100% humidity and I get my best slickest paint jobs.
So I'll never believe the humidity is a problem.
(The Ford plant here in town has a waterfall in their paint both line)
It also prooves that most of the dirt comes from outside,
otherwise raining wouldn't make a difference.
Also, I've learned, the less exhaust air I run, the less dirt I get.
And I don't pull air directly across the car anymore-that
made a big difference too.
My fan is an explosion proof greenhouse/barn fan with a variable speed adjuster - and will move anywhere from 1050cfm down to barely turning and moving air and my filters are mounted high just so I don't pass air over my paint surface. I operate it just fast enough to keep the air reasonably clear and with the Iwata 400LPH gun, that doesn't take much as there is minimal overspray.

Isn't Ford using a water borne paint system now?
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Old 09-18-2007, 07:13 PM
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Another note with a wet floor... if the air hose gets in a puddle of water between coats for instance, water can then be trapped in the coupler on the end of the hose and next it goes onto the gun and plugs the water into the line hence
can , has , and will then come through the gun and onto the surface causing fisheyes and cussing so keep the air hose end up out of the water ... even if you have a inline filter there at the gun keep the end dry ..
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Old 09-18-2007, 07:36 PM
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Look at everything very closely like previously mentioned, the dirt can come from very many places. Your clothes or suit can trap a lot of fuzzies-look at some of the cheap tyvek suits and you'll see millions of fibers standing on the surface-these do get in your paint. A good paintsuit helps a lot. Clean hoses, cleaning well in advance of doing the shoot, running the fan for a long period of time before any spraying begins, cleaning the car good including the masked areas. Also masking paper can cause nibs-some of the cheaper primer grade papers have a lot of loose fibers. Masking plastic works really well. Your entry air needs to be clean-spray booth filters work best. The least amount of dust disturbing movement during and after the shoot the better.

One of the shop's I worked in years ago had two booths, one downdraft state of the art (at the time) bake booth and the other was an aniquated devilbiss cross draft booth that nobody wanted to use. At times we were so busy there was always a fight to use the new booth so rather than wait I started using the old booth. After decreasing the airspeed, new filters, better door seals, and a step by step protocol figured out I had jobs that were turning out much better than those that were coming out of the downdraft booth. It took time to tune that old booth and figure out the setup proceedure but it worked well. The bottom line is you can do top of the line quality paintjobs in a dirt floor barn if your setup is right, it requires building a clean spray environment within but it really is basic common sense.
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Old 09-19-2007, 05:21 AM
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I know of one painter that gets really clean paint jobs
by painting the car outside early in the morning.
He actually rolls the car outside, in front of his garage before spraying.
He prefers a morning when the dew is still on the grass.
They're unbelievably clean.
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