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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 11-10-2011, 07:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisco
The 1926-1927 Model 'T' Ford had a vent in the cowl and the gas tank was under the seat. Rectangular shaped.
This is an incorrect statement. 1926-1927 T's had the gas tank under the cowl. The gas filler door was on the cowl. This applies to Coupes, Sedans and Roadsters.

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Old 11-10-2011, 09:32 PM
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Model A gas tank

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisco
The 1928 & 1929 Model 'A' Ford cowl gas tanks hold 10 gallons.

The 1930 & 1931 Model 'A' Ford cowl gas tanks hold 11 gallons.

The 1915-1925 Model 'T' Ford had the gas tank under the seat. Oval shaped.

The 1926-1927 Model 'T' Ford had a vent in the cowl and the gas tank was under the seat. Rectangular shaped.

The lever operated shut-off screws into the bottom of the gas tank using tapered pipe threads on the '28, '29, '30 & early '31 models.

This was changed on the later '31 models with the indented firewall so that the shut-off valve was no longer in the cab.

Ford and/or the government felt this change was safer in the event of a collision. It also is/was a nuisance for the operator to shut off the fuel supply. Before this change the operator could just reach under the dash/gas tank and shut off the lever. After the change, the operator would have to get out of the car, raise the passenger side of the hood, shut the valve off, close the hood and re-latch it.
Frisco I don't want to make this a p-----g match but the 26/27 tank was under the dash I took enough out to fill a semi. In the last 50 years I have had at least 1000 26/27 model T's either roadsters, coupes or 2drs. Many complete, many just bodys, with gas tanks, some running, most not, I got rid of the last one I had 2 years ago, not one of those had a gas tank under the seat.

Bob


http://www.bobsantiqueautoparts.com/...ct/list/.../6/

Last edited by 35terraplane; 11-10-2011 at 09:54 PM. Reason: delete/add
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Old 11-10-2011, 11:36 PM
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When fuel leaked from the cowl tank onto the floor beneath my throttle in my then-A 30 Briggs Fordor, and my daughters were riding in the rear seat, I was done with cowl mounted tanks back in 1980 I then (1984-1995) tried twin fiberglass fiberglass tanks mounted outside the frame, but beneath the side panels on either side, below the body. I was not pleased with the prospect, in the event of a side impact, of having fuel tanks outside the frame. My current setup, still inside the same A frame, but now with a 29 Tudor Sedan atop, was two aluminum tanks, joined by a metal U tube, filled at the rear by a single inlet. Together, the two tanks hold just over 13 gallons. The fill tube is located at the right rear (passenger side) and fuel is pushed forward to the engine with a Holley electric "Blue" pump. At the engine, I limit fuel pressure below 6 psi to avoid overloading the twin Holley 600s atop the blower. I have have had no problems with the current setup in a street/strip A that goes for groceries then runs high 10s in the quarter.
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Old 11-11-2011, 08:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakeroadster
This is an incorrect statement. 1926-1927 T's had the gas tank under the cowl. The gas filler door was on the cowl. This applies to Coupes, Sedans and Roadsters.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
Frisco the 26/27 tank was under the dash
Thank you for the comments.

We are all correct, although I missed it somewhat.

To clarify my comments:

Go HERE and HERE and also HERE .

It seems that in 1926 the gas tank location was moved from under the seat to under the cowl for most models. The exception was the Fordor and the truck. The Fordor continued to have the tank under the driver's seat; the truck used the oval tank under the seat.

As to the cowl vent; the fuel filler was located under a door similar in appearance to a cowl vent. It did act somewhat as a vent although the gas tank blocked most of the air flow.

On the Fordor model, the cowl 'vent' was in fact a vent.
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Old 11-11-2011, 10:22 AM
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model A fuel tank

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisco
Thank you for the comments.

We are all correct, although I missed it somewhat.

To clarify my comments:

Go HERE and HERE and also HERE .

It seems that in 1926 the gas tank location was moved from under the seat to under the cowl for most models. The exception was the Fordor and the truck. The Fordor continued to have the tank under the driver's seat; the truck used the oval tank under the seat.

As to the cowl vent; the fuel filler was located under a door similar in appearance to a cowl vent. It did act somewhat as a vent although the gas tank blocked most of the air flow.

On the Fordor model, the cowl 'vent' was in fact a vent.
Frisco I hope every thing is Good. If I know anything about old Fords, I know a little about the 26/27. My first car was a 27 coupe when I was 12, sold it before I finished it, got a 27 roadster. I was working in a junk yard, I had my pick of these cars. I knew the Fordor had the tank under the seat, didn't know about the truck, but I never had any. I knew that the tank was carried over in the Fordor onto the model a For one or two years I think.

I had seen some sites said the tank was under the dash in the 24/25 T but it wasn't very clear so I didn't say anything I never had any of them either.

There used to be a outfit in Iowa that built tanks for model A's that went under the splash aprons, but like 471A said I don't know if I would want them there.

26/27 tanks are worth about $200.00 each today , if you can find good ones. I used to buy them for $25.00 and sell them for around $75.00 If I would only have known.

Bob
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2011, 10:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
There used to be a outfit in Iowa that built tanks for model A's that went under the splash aprons, but like 471A said I don't know if I would want them there.

Bob
Bob, those are by TANK'S Inc. They are a pair of 6-7 gallon tanks that fit under the 'A' splash aprons on each side. They are well made out of an engineering plastic. Unfortunately, they do hang pretty low in the front, and in some cases below the scrub line. This makes them the first part that hits the ground in case of a flat/lost wheel/front suspension failure - poooooof . You can see them here

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Old 11-11-2011, 10:51 AM
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Model A TANK

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irelands child
Bob, those are by TANK'S Inc. They are a pair of 6-7 gallon tanks that fit under the 'A' splash aprons on each side. They are well made out of an engineering plastic. Unfortunately, they do hang pretty low in the front, and in some cases below the scrub line. This makes them the first part that hits the ground in case of a flat/lost wheel/front suspension failure - poooooof . You can see them here

Dave W

Dave I didn't know John (Tanks) even made them, I haven't seen the others in years. I could see where they could be trouble.

I have known Tank's for years, He is a member of MSRA. he also came over to my shop at home to measure for my gas tank on my 33, He also put it in the 33.

Bob
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 11-11-2011, 03:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
Frisco I hope every thing is Good. If I know anything about old Fords, I know a little about the 26/27. My first car was a 27 coupe when I was 12, sold it before I finished it, got a 27 roadster.
All is good.

I appreciate all you add to this site. Your knowledge and experience are a major plus to all of us that come here.

Like you, if I know anything about old Fords, I know a little about the '28-'31. My first car was a 1930 Ford Coupe that I bought for $15 when I was 14 years old. My mom wouldn't let me bring it home so I sold it to my buddy. We put a '51 Olds engine and '37 LaSalle trans in it. '50 Olds rear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
I had seen some sites said the tank was under the dash in the 24/25 T but it wasn't very clear so I didn't say anything I never had any of them either.
I have had a stock 1915, 1923 and a 1924 Ford Model 'T' in years past. All had the gas tank under the seat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
There used to be a outfit in Iowa that built tanks for model A's that went under the splash aprons, but like 471A said I don't know if I would want them there.
Bob
The '28 Ford Closed Cab Pickup in my avatar had saddle tanks as you described. They were not built by the company TANKS but by a competitor. I found that out when I called TANKS about the transfer valve and they advised me that the saddle tanks I had were NOT theirs. The woman I spoke to was very rude.

My experience with the saddle tanks I had was that the material they are made from, the shape will get deformed. The sides looked sucked in. Mine also had a vent hose at the rear of the tanks. If the tanks were more than half full and the front end of the vehicle was raised (on jack stands to work on the front brakes), gas would flow from the vent hoses. Lengthening the vent hoses and raising their location up solved that.

Also because the fill neck was so short (exited out the side of the splash aprons) the tanks could not be filled completely without spillage. Longer fill necks in a higher location would prevent that, but I never changed it.

Last edited by Frisco; 11-11-2011 at 04:02 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 11-16-2011, 07:00 PM
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Model A Gas Tank

Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
I don't think I would want gasoline right in front of me. Just because they are Hot Rods doesn't mean they can't get in crashes. You have all the wires under there and the gas. not a good combo.

Bob

Welcome to the board.
I agree with the posts. I cut the bottom out of my tank and mounted the A/C in there. I added 32 rails on the back and mounted my tank there. I also didn't like the side tanks because of the collision fears. At least if I get hit in the back, I might get out alive.
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Old 11-16-2011, 10:08 PM
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fuel tank

Hi all: Newbi here. I've got a '29 Ford Tudor with a cowl tank. I have a '79 buick V6 auto as power. The cowl to rad distance did not have to be moved. The rod looks stock as for length and is. The rod was built in 1984. The cowl tank is still stock; no leaks. I don't use a fuel pump. The original fuel outlet from the tank is above the 4-barrel carb. I have done 80 mph on the inland highway here on Vancouver Island and have experienced no problems even going up General Hill in Campbell River. BTW, up here, I have only 8 gallon capacity(Canadian, you know, not US). I am getting about 18 mph (my calcs, again Canada). Anyway, you guys out there know we are not going to drive as though we are in one ton trucks doing a road race. Drive safe as though the rest are out to get you, Wayne.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 11-17-2011, 05:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wtrueman
I don't use a fuel pump.
Wayne,



Follow the fuel line from the gas tank, it goes to the fuel pump before it goes to the carb, right?

I call shennanigans... 'cause even a little V-6 has to have a fuel pump to run (Well... unless you have a 1920's gravity feed carb. on the motor!)

John

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Old 11-17-2011, 06:05 AM
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Wayne - as a note, it isn't necessarily how YOU drive your car, it's how someone else drives that hypothetical 1 ton pick up truck that weighs in empty, as mine does, at over 8000 pounds vs your 2500+/- pound 80+ year old car sitting on that spindly frame. I really don't want that 8-10 gallons of gas in my lap, burning away merrily. I suggest you go back and read my first post in regard to the energy content in a gas tank.

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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 11-17-2011, 04:59 PM
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Model A fuel tank

In 1962, Uncle Sam outlawed bottom fed fuel tanks....in case of accident the gravity fed fuel will feed a fire..F F F F.
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Old 11-18-2011, 10:17 PM
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To john:

Yes, my 4 barrel carb is gravity fed. The fuel pump, although still in place has not been used since at least September 18, 2011 and, from what the seller told me, has not been used when it failed out on the freeway in August 2011. He by-passed the fuel pump wirh a simple hose connection so he could get it home. Being about 2-3 inches higher and with a small (about 8 Can. gallons), this is so much a classic mistake that most of us have all made: a little fix will get us home. That being said, I drove through rush-hour traffic in Surrey, BC, to the Ferry, to Nanaimo, and the to home, Gold River, BC. No problems, and up to about 140 kmph( only when safe officer), on the freeway. Pulled in to home at 11:30 that night. No problems. And I get about 18 miles per gallon(I`m old enough to have to use BOTH kinds of usage. Wayne. BTW, come to Gold River when its warm;n I`ll show you the fuel setup and take you for a ride. BTW, Gold River is a neat place to retire to. Wayne.
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Old 11-19-2011, 04:28 AM
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I also agree that safe tank placement should have a lot of consideration. But at the same time I think we can over do it trying to anesthetize the rod world. Really if you are in a bad enough crash for the cowl tank to get ruptured, you are already in a world of hurt. The same crash on any other impact point could cause any but the very safest tank to burn you to a crisp. I guess what it boils down to for me is this, we can't replace situational awareness with engineering. Old Hotrods are not as safe as late model cars so you drive them differntly, like riding a motorcycle. You drive for everyone on the road and pay attention to what everyone else is doing. There are very few if any unavoidable accidents.
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