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Old 04-05-2009, 09:33 PM
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My blown 202 running on straight lpg gas video

Hi guys, havent been around for a while, been busy with work commitments.
Just thought i would share with you the results of my weekend working bee.
The weekend just past had 8 guys and there wives visit me from all over the state, some of them travelling for 4,6,7 hours to get here.
they are all freinds i have made over the years at ozrodders.com an ozzi hotrod forum, they bought with them my new engine, A 202 3.3 litre holden or gm engine, it has been built for me by one of the guys on the ozzi forum.
It has had quite a bit of work go into the internals and runs 2x 200 cfm lpg gas carbs at the back of an eaton m90 supercharger, it is estamated that this engine will rev to 7000 rpm and make 320 to 340 hp, to say i am happy with the result is an understatement, anyway just thought i would post you a youtube link to the video of its first startup sitting in my rod.
cheers barnsey.
youtube video below

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxPUxCcqDg0


here is a pic of the car it is going in, ts a 1948 vauxhall.

one happy owner

a pic of my new enine

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Old 04-05-2009, 10:25 PM
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Cool stuff, great to see one of the little blowers put to good use.

Just a question, does anyone in Oz ever build a new tubular intake manifold and mount the blower on the new manifold?
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Old 04-06-2009, 03:42 AM
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Will be getting a new manifold made when i can get a bit more cash lol,
the reason we mounted the supercharger on top and to the right is because when the front fenders and grill shell are mounted there is no room on the manfold side, I could have mounted it on a four barrel manifold but would have had to cut a hole in the grillshell and top part of fender.
when i get the engine and other mechanicals sorted and run in, I will be then looking at getting new brackets and maybe a blow through tubular system made for it.
cheers barnsey
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Old 04-06-2009, 04:13 AM
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Good old red motor a they sure hang in don't they, raced a 186 in an FX at Calder drags many moons ago had heeps of fun , that looks like a 48 Vauxhall you got there barnsley
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Old 04-06-2009, 04:14 AM
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Good old red motor a they sure hang in don't they, raced a 186 in an FX at Calder drags many moons ago had heeps of fun , that looks like a 48 Vauxhall you got there barnsley
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Old 04-06-2009, 06:01 AM
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Good dam job!

Ever since Grubby defected and came to the states, I've been more aware of the goings ons of you all Aussies.

And I must say, you guys come up w/some brilliant workarounds. I'd like to see what gear heads from Down Under could do w/the average American's parts availability and cost!

I wish we could get the cars you get from the OEM's here (except for the wrong-hand drive position lol). We did get the dumbed down GTO that was called something else there, but all the cool I-6's, and other assorted hardware is unobtainium for us in the US for the most part.
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Old 04-06-2009, 08:57 AM
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Is grubby a panel beater named matt from the central coast ?
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barnsey
Is grubby a panel beater named matt from the central coast ?
Nah, real name's David Grubnic.

He races Top Fuel on the Kalitta Motorsports team, NHRA. He's their research driver/car. Any changes to the set-ups gets put on his car first because he's the shizts at diagnosing and feed back to the crew chief.
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:59 AM
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Very cool indeed, great to see what is going on down under...give us more.

Thanks
Vince
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Old 01-17-2010, 04:41 AM
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Hey guys, I have been a bit quiet around here again latley, my old computer decided that it didn't want to work anymore and gave up the ghost.
anyway a lot has happened since my last post, I have just finished moving house and decided after fitting the new engine and rebuilding my chassis that it would be nice to change the color, I have frenched all my tail lights and licence plate in accross the back and fitted a jaguar flush mount fuel filler cap, I am in the process of painting the car in a violet color, I have also welded up the dash, smoothed it up and mounted a new set of 6 gauges, next job to complete will be frenching the mounting position on top of my front fenders to fit my new guide headlamps,
I have lots of build pics so i will try and set up a build journal soon, here are a couple of pics of how the car is looking at present.
cheers barnsey



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Old 01-17-2010, 08:40 AM
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Odd Sense

Ingenious. Just watched the video, could have sworn I could smell the new paint cooking on the engine. olnolan
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Old 11-27-2010, 04:55 AM
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I have picked up this B&M Supercharger from ebay and decided to use this one instead of the M90, it came already fitted to a modded manifold to suite my engine, and had been reco'd by an australian Top Alcohol Racer at his shop.

I was wondering if anyone could help me ID what size supercharger it is, i was told it was a 144 off a windsor, but after seeing a few 144's on this site i have my doubts as it looks a little smaller and seems to have less ribs in the casing. any ideas ?
cheers barnsey


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Old 11-27-2010, 10:42 AM
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I know B&M had one smaller than the 144, it was intended for V6 applications. Can't for the life of me remember the size though, I never had a reason beyond a passing glance to look at the specs for one close. 122 maybe??
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Old 11-27-2010, 01:49 PM
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bassackwards

Hey Barnsey, Is your negative bassackwards or did you mess up and put the steering wheel on the wrong side? I just wanted to be the first to let you know it was bassackwards. olnolan
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Old 11-28-2010, 11:43 AM
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I have been googling away and can not seem to find a b&m under the 144, I also tried typing b&m 122 but had no luck finding those either.
It would be great to find out what size it is, just in case i need to buy parts for it one day. anyway thanks for your replies, they are much appreciated.
cheers barnsey

p.s the steering is on the RH side in Australia because we drive on the left hand side of the road over here
here's a little history that some may be interested in.

The History Of Left and Right Hand Drive
About a quarter of the world drives on the left, and the countries that do are mostly old British colonies. This strange quirk perplexes the rest of the world; but there is a perfectly good reason.

In the past, almost everybody travelled on the left side of the road because that was the most sensible option for feudal, violent societies. Since most people are right-handed, swordsmen preferred to keep to the left in order to have their right arm nearer to an opponent and their scabbard further from him. Moreover, it reduced the chance of the scabbard (worn on the left) hitting other people.

Furthermore, a right-handed person finds it easier to mount a horse from the left side of the horse, and it would be very difficult to do otherwise if wearing a sword (which would be worn on the left). It is safer to mount and dismount towards the side of the road, rather than in the middle of traffic, so if one mounts on the left, then the horse should be ridden on the left side of the road.

In the late 1700s, however, teamsters in France and the United States began hauling farm products in big wagons pulled by several pairs of horses. These wagons had no driver's seat; instead the driver sat on the left rear horse, so he could keep his right arm free to lash the team. Since he was sitting on the left, he naturally wanted everybody to pass on the left so he could look down and make sure he kept clear of the oncoming wagon's wheels. Therefore he kept to the right side of the road.

In addition, the French Revolution of 1789 gave a huge impetus to right-hand travel in Europe. The fact is, before the Revolution, the aristocracy travelled on the left of the road, forcing the peasantry over to the right, but after the storming of the Bastille and the subsequent events, aristocrats preferred to keep a low profile and joined the peasants on the right. An official keep-right rule was introduced in Paris in 1794, more or less parallel to Denmark , where driving on the right had been made compulsory in 1793.

Later, Napoleon's conquests spread the new rightism to the Low Countries (Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg), Switzerland, Germany, Poland, Russia and many parts of Spain and Italy. The states that had resisted Napoleon kept left – Britain, the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Portugal. This European division, between the left- and right-hand nations would remain fixed for more than 100 years, until after the First World War.

Although left-driving Sweden ceded Finland to right-driving Russia after the Russo-Swedish War (1808-1809), Swedish law – including traffic regulations – remained valid in Finland for another 50 years. It wasn't until 1858 that an Imperial Russian decree made Finland swap sides.

The trend among nations over the years has been toward driving on the right, but Britain has done its best to stave off global homogenisation. With the expansion of travel and road building in the 1800s, traffic regulations were made in every country. Left-hand driving was made mandatory in Britain in 1835. Countries which were part of the British Empire followed suit. This is why to this very day, India, Australasia and the former British colonies in Africa go left. An exception to the rule, however, is Egypt, which had been conquered by Napoleon before becoming a British dependency.

Although Japan was never part of the British Empire, its traffic also goes to the left. Although the origin of this habit goes back to the Edo period (1603-1867) when Samurai ruled the country, it wasn't until 1872 that this unwritten rule became more or less official. That was the year when Japan's first railway was introduced, built with technical aid from the British. Gradually, a massive network of railways and tram tracks was built, and of course all trains and trams drove on the left-hand side. Still, it took another half century till in 1924 left-side driving was clearly written in a law.

When the Dutch arrived in Indonesia in 1596, they brought along their habit of driving on the left. It wasn't until Napoleon conquered the Netherlands that the Dutch started driving on the right. Most of their colonies, however, remained on the left as did Indonesia and Suriname.

In the early years of English colonisation of North America, English driving customs were followed and the colonies drove on the left. After gaining independence from England, however, they were anxious to cast off all remaining links with their British colonial past and gradually changed to right-hand driving. (Incidentally, the influence of other European countries' nationals should not be underestimated.) The first law requiring drivers to keep right was passed in Pennsylvania in 1792, and similar laws were passed in New York in 1804 and New Jersey in 1813.

Despite the developments in the US, some parts of Canada continued to drive on the left until shortly after the Second World War. The territory controlled by the French (from Quebec to Louisiana) drove on the right, but the territory occupied by the English (British Columbia, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland) kept left. British Columbia and the Atlantic provinces switched to the right in the 1920s in order to conform with the rest of Canada and the USA. Newfoundland drove on the left until 1947, and joined Canada in 1949.

In Europe, the remaining left-driving countries switched one by one to driving on the right. Portugal changed in 1920s. The change took place on the same day in the whole country, including the colonies. Territories, however, which bordered other left-driving countries were exempted. That is why Macau, Goa (now part of India) and Portuguese East Africa kept the old system. East Timor, which borders left-driving Indonesia, did change to the right though, but left-hand traffic was reintroduced by the Indonesians in 1975.

In Italy the practice of driving on the right first began in the late 1890s. The first Italian Highway Code, issued on the 30th of June 1912, stated that all vehicles had to drive on the right. Cities with a tram network, however, could retain left-hand driving if they placed warning signs at their city borders. The 1923 decree is a bit stricter, but Rome and the northern cities of Milan, Turin and Genoa could still keep left until further orders from the Ministry of Public Works. By the mid-1920s, right-hand driving became finally standard throughout the country. Rome made the change on the 1 of March 1925 and Milan on the 3rd of August 1926.

Up till the 1930s Spain lacked national traffic regulations. Some parts of the country drove on the right (e.g. Barcelona) and other parts drove on the left (e.g. Madrid). On the 1st of October 1924 Madrid switched to driving on the right.

The break-up of the Austro-Hungarian Empire caused no change: Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Hungary continued to drive on the left. Austria itself was something of a curiosity. Half the country drove on the left and half on the right. The dividing line was precisely the area affected by Napoleon's conquests in 1805.

When Germany annexed Austria in 1938, Hitler ordered that the traffic should change from the left to the right side of the road, overnight. The change threw the driving public into turmoil, because motorists were unable to see most road signs. In Vienna it proved impossible to change the trams overnight, so while all other traffic took to the right-hand side of the road, the trams continued to run on the left for several weeks. Czechoslovakia and Hungary , one of the last states on the mainland of Europe to keep left, changed to the right after being invaded by Germany in 1939.

Meanwhile, the power of the right kept growing steadily. American cars were designed to be driven on the right by locating the drivers' controls on the vehicle's left side. With the mass production of reliable and economical cars in the United States, initial exports used the same design, and out of necessity many countries changed their rule of the road.

Gibraltar changed to right-hand traffic in 1929 and China in 1946. Korea now drives right, but only because it passed directly from Japanese colonial rule to American and Russian influence at the end of the Second World War. Pakistan also considered changing to the right in the 1960s, but ultimately decided not to do it. The main argument against the shift was that camel trains often drove through the night while their drivers were dozing. The difficulty in teaching old camels new tricks was decisive in forcing Pakistan to reject the change. Nigeria, a former British colony, had traditionally been driving on the left with British imported right-hand-drive cars, but when it gained independence, it tried to throw off its colonial past as quick as possible and shifted to driving on the right.

After the Second World War, left-driving Sweden , the odd one out in mainland Europe, felt increasing pressure to change sides in order to conform with the rest of the continent. The problem was that all their neighbours already drove on the right side and since there are a lot of small roads without border guards leading into Norway and Finland, one had to remember in which country one was.

In 1955, the Swedish government held a referendum on the introduction of right-hand driving. Although no less than 82.9% voted “no” to the plebiscite, the Swedish parliament passed a law on the conversion to right-hand driving in 1963. Finally, the change took place on Sunday, the 3rd of September 1967, at 5 o'clock in the morning.

All traffic with private motor-driven vehicles was prohibited four hours before and one hour after the conversion, in order to be able to rearrange all traffic signs. Even the army was called in to help. Also a very low speed limit was applied, which was raised in a number of steps. The whole process took about a month. After Sweden's successful changeover, Iceland changed the following year, in 1968.

In the 1960s, Great Britain also considered changing, but the country's conservative powers did everything they could to nip the proposal in the bud. Furthermore, the fact that it would cost billions of pounds to change everything round wasn't much of an incentive… Eventually, Britain dropped the idea. Today, only four European countries still drive on the left: the United Kingdom, Ireland, Cyprus and Malta.
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