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Old 12-29-2005, 04:56 PM
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My first Spread..... Of filler that is..

Well, I finally did it. After all the wonderful advice I finally mixed and laid down my first line of filler , while lying on my back of course and on the underside of my truck. Well how did it go you ask? Hmmmm, dam that was fun and true to my nature, if some if good then as my boy says more is "Gooder"? Well the mixing went well and got that nice consistent color, I actually used some left over tile pieces to mix on since it would be easier to clean up. I carefully matched my hardening solution to the picture did some color compares and.... filler was every where. Nuts all that wonderful advice went right out the window. But after trying to sand it before it fully cured so sanding would be easier, I loaded up a few 80 grit pieces will filler, then gave up and let it stand. So now I have learned that more is not better just harder to sand and more sanding time. One question is since I have it in the garage, would it be OK if i finished sanding tonight, put on another "light" coat then finish sand tomorrow. Also how long can the filler be exposed before I spray my epoxy primer over it? My filler is Evercoat Rage and my epoxy primer is ppg mp170.

Once Again thanks everyone I've laid down my first filler line and I'm going in for more. OH by the way here in SA, TX right now its a cool 72 degrees.
Hook EM Horns.

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Old 12-29-2005, 08:23 PM
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Congradulations haha. The smell of filler will burn your nose if you do this long enough.

You can apply more filler at any time, at 72 degrees it should be sandable in about 15-20 minutes, overnight will be ok.

Here's a trick that sometimes helps a person new to filler work especially in tight areas. Get yourself two spreaders, one spreader to apply the filler with then cover the filler with saran wrap and use the other clean spreader to shape your filler under the saran wrap, let it cure some and pull off the saran wrap. This might help especially with the challenges of working overhead.

You can put epoxy on whenever you're done sanding, 1 day, a few days, a week. Winter air is usually dry so I doubt there's any chance of humidity related problems right now. Bob
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Old 12-29-2005, 10:01 PM
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I like to sand initial applications of filler with 40 grit, though you can get carried away with and leave nasty scratches everywhere if you're not careful. 40 is good for getting out spreader marks and leveling out areas where the filler is too heavy. It won't load as bad, whack any sticky stuff out of the paper with a paint stick or blow it out with a blow gun. Switch to 80 grit before you go too far.
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Old 12-30-2005, 03:48 PM
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I do much the same as crash. I start with 36 grit first for straightening, other then stuff that doesn't need much shaping and is just a thin coat, like sanding finishing putty. I would rather the paper load a little and knock some of it off with a paint stick then to have the filler set up rock hard and have to sand harder. Just don't take to much off with the 36, get most of it to shape and leave some to go over with 80 grit to take out the courser scratches. Or sometimes if I have a real large area I am doing I'll get it to shape and straight with 36 grit and not even touch it with a finer grit, or worry about feather edgeing the filler out too much, go fill any low areas that need more work with more filler and catch it while its still a bit soft so it cuts down easier so you aint taking a lot of the previous coat of filler when sanding the area. Then when everything is straight and feeling right, feather in the edges good and put one thin coat of finishing filler over the whole thing to take care of minor spots and the scratches and sand that with a finer grit. Fun fun fun, expecially what you are doing if its overhead. Are your arms getting tired yet? Hope not, lots more sanding ahead before paint, and a good chance some wetsanding after paint also.
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Old 12-31-2005, 03:27 PM
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Yup my arms are starting to get tired. Need some help.

Ken,
I've put down my second coat of filler but I really stink at this and I'm learning. The picture here is of the backside of the truck .
You can see I got some low spots, the problem is, I'm going to be applying my 3rd layer of filler but I'm not sure if I need to knock it down a little more or just go ahead and fill it and as I did before sand it with the 80 grit while its still soft. This is a vertical line i'm trying to work on. Also I eased up on the hardener. Man my first batch just about got hard before I got any on. So lesson learned. Any advice would be appreciated. and yup that lying on your back and hand sanding has been a pain. But well worth it. Were having 74 degree temps right now so between the dogs sneaking in for a peak and the weather its been great.

Thanks.

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Old 12-31-2005, 07:45 PM
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Its hard to tell for me from pictures, but from what I can see you have a pretty large area to do and have quite a few craters, maybe its magnified by the picture. I would fill any really low areas first with more filler to get it level with the rest so you don't have to worry about applying as thick when you apply another coat to the whole shebang. Maybe feel where your worst areas are and circle around the edge of it with a pencil, and then fill them first so they aren't low, and work the edge of the filler you just applyed with your spreader while still wet, so it will feather in with the filler you already have on easier when you have to sand it. Get the hardener to where it will harden up within a reasonable amount of time and still give you time to apply and spread on the area nicely. The neater you can apply your filler the less sanding you will have and better chance of all being smooth. Gotta be tough applying overhead nicely and not have it drop all off on top of you. Don't worry too much about scratches, they can be worked out by going over with a finer grit later or by spreading a thin coat over the whole area again once it is level and straight and have a lot of the holes filled. A thin coat of filler will have less chance of holes and can work out minor stuff by sanding when you are close. Is that the sharpe edge of the filler on the left edge? if it is, looks like could use more working to get that level to rest. If your filler goes right to the edge of something, well then it will be a bit easier as you don't have to worry about it feathering in, just so it is not a lot higher then what its next to. It doesn't have to be feathered perfectly at the roughing out point, but should be starting to level and feather if you are sanding your filler from one end to the other. Use as long of a block as you can comfortably work with and sand the entire area from one end of the bondo area to the other, sanding in x patterns if possible until the edge of your filler is feathered in somewhat. Takes some experience to get the feel of what is still high and should be worked more, and when you are feeling a low area that should be filled more. Not unexpected that a newbie to it takes quite a few applications of filler to get it to the point of primer. Even experienced rarely get a fairly large area that also needs a fair amount of fill in one shot. In the rough out stages for a large enough area, and 8" orbital can really save some muscle, and I use an air straight line sander quite a bit once things are roughed out. Keep at it, and take breaks if you get discouraged or tired of looking at it. You can always work a little on another area if you still want to get some work done on it. But first thing I would do is forget that 80 grit and switch to 36 grit and save some muscle working the area. Maybe if you could get a few more pictures could help you out better, I have a tough time often looking at them often and telling whats going on. But to sum up this long rambling reply. From what I can tell work the area more sanding the filler from one end to the other, circle your low spots and fill them areas, sand and feather them in with your existing filler. If you feel a bump and its higher then the rest when you run your hand across the area sand some more. If it still feels low and you feel a dip, fill it again. Once you run your hand over the whole thing and it feels pretty good and you have high spots sanded enough and you don't feel any major low areas, fill the whole area you are working on with one thin neat coat of filler. Thats when you can think about starting out with a finer grit like 80 or worry about scratches. By god, save your arms some. Some people say using a thin cloth gloves help beginners feel there bodywork better, hold your hand flat and your fingertips will tell you whats high and whats low. I don't know, after doing it for years, I think you can feel things a little too good sometimes and a little dip that will be taken care of by primer or most people would never even notice, will start to bug the heck out of you. Okay on a quick lighter note. At work they were talking about a guy that use to work there, He was applying fiberglass mat over head inside the cab of a semi to repair cracks. It fell right on top of him, and fiberglass resin is a mess. He also wasn't wearing a cap or anything. Thank god I never had anything like that happen. I had a little piece of fiberglass on my mustache once and it was a ***** getting that hardened up ball of resin out. I can just imagine a head full resin. I don't think I could have contained myself if I witnessed it.
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Old 12-31-2005, 07:49 PM
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If you are asking if that surface is ready for another coat of filler, it looks like the answer is no. In fact, it barely looks knocked down. I still see spreader marks there. Filler won't magically fix something, it needs to be sanded a LOT, sanded into the proper shape. Inexperience in using the spreader to help achieve the proper contour adds to the need to sand. Get busy!
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Old 01-01-2006, 01:21 AM
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Help... We got this fog and my trucks outside... with filler line exposed

Wholly crap, out of no where we get this light mist of fog at midnight and my truck is outside, will I have to redo all the filler line i've been working on? The rain was really just a light fog? I could use some advice. Thanks everyone. Hope you had a safe night..

MP
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Old 01-01-2006, 09:00 AM
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You'll be fine, just get it to dry out. Once it sets in some dry warm temps it will be fine. A red scotchbrite will clean off any flash rust that may have started.
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Old 01-01-2006, 09:23 AM
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A heat lamp would help, or get some sun on it for a while, then red scotchbrite it when it's good and dry like baddbob says.
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Old 01-01-2006, 02:15 PM
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ooh sooo smoooth.

Well guys I got after it this afternoon and now I have one smoooooth line. Now I know it's not perfect but it's smooooth and really close to it. The weather here is supposed to be a cool 83 degrees. We got people trying to tan right now... Here's the line now:

Here is what the line look like before:
.
I will take one more look at it and then see if there is any places on the right of the line that needs work then put in my skim coat and feather it out.
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Old 01-01-2006, 04:23 PM
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I can't physically feel if it is bumpy or straight, but from what I can tell, looks like you made some progress. Thats looking better to me. If you can keep a 6" da flat and know how to use it, with some 80 grit works pretty good to feather the edges out, just keep it moving, you could do that now prior to yours skim coat if it feels like you are pretty close, then just use the skim coat to fill your scratches and catch the minor stuff left, and sand that with maybe 80 and maybe just go over little with 180 when you have all your areas taken care of and prime. 80 degrees ha, we had a heat wave here this weekend, a balmy 34 degrees. People must be thinking of getting stuff done for spring time already, been getting quite a few people emailing about having some bodywork done lately. Sounds like you are having our summer weather there already.
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Old 01-01-2006, 06:34 PM
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Question on mixing skim coat of filler.

Hey Ken,
Wow you guys must be in shorts and t-shirts for that warm snap. . Were under some type of Burn Ban right now because it's so dry, so ya I'm trying to get as much of the prep work done so I can go shopping for a paint booth I can rent. One question on the skim coat of filler, do you go a little liter on the hardener than usual? or mix it the same? Also once I got the skim down, due to the location of the filler line I'm not sure I can get a large orbital around it, but I do have a small block dewalt orbital I can use. See the area of filler is down in a recess area so I'm just getting it back to flush again, with the filler. The sad part about this line is you wont see it because it will be behind the truck bed. But I will know it's there. I'm hanging up the sander for today and throwing some deer meat on the grill for the night. Thanks a ton and tomorrow I'm going to finish off that line and feather it out.
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Old 01-01-2006, 08:05 PM
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I mix the filler the same for the skim coat, since you aren't building up the filler a little at that point, should be a little quicker to get on. Get filler on the whole area and then go over with the spreader trying to make a long tight passes(if you don't need build) down the whole length. again the neater you put it on, the easier the sanding out will be. Its not really to big a deal how you spread it on I guess since it wont be putting it on real thick, but the neater and more practice you get at shaping and applying filler nicely with the right amount of build, makes sanding and things go quicker later. I don't know what kind of filler you are using, but if the area is pretty good now, and you are to the point of just putting a thin coat over the whole thing, you may want to consider using a finishing filler at that point. They spread smoother and sand fairly easy, and can also be used on top of primer if you need to fill any small imperfections. They cost a little bit more then regular filler though. Been lots of post on filler on here, and I am sure you have read them. I don't know about your dewalt sander, never tried one, but imagine it will work. I know what you mean spending time on an area you don't really see and it would bug you just knowing its there. But does give you good practice for other areas that are more visable you may be doing later on. After you got it done and painted if you have some gloss on it, you can look down it from the side in light and see how straight it looks and look it over to kind of gauge what kind of job you did, and if there are any things you might want to get better when doing an area everyone will see. Now that I see your pic a little better, I take back the sanding in an x pattern don't really look like you have the width and the whole perimeter of the filler to feather out sanding, but that works well when straightening large filler areas on large panels.
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Old 01-01-2006, 08:25 PM
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I'm not sure is this is what I am seeing, but is this filler being applied over a seam? Is this seam welded solid, stitch, spot or MIG plug welded? That looks like an area on the back of the cab that is normally a lap seam with seam sealer.
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