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-   -   This my friends, is a "show car". (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/my-friends-show-car-155832.html)

MARTINSR 03-28-2009 10:25 PM

This my friends, is a "show car".
 
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We have all heard the term "show car". I have heard it used many times on cars that in my humble opinion were far from "show cars" to me. They were "nice" cars, they may have been put in shows, but they were most certainly not "show cars".

In my opinion a real show car can be shown disassembled. Yep, you could pull the interior out of the car and who it and it will still look good. You can just tell looking at it, even where you can't see looks as good as where you can, you just get that feeling looking at it. It is so finely detailed that you just know if you removed a panel or part it would be just as beautiful behind the part, you know what I mean?

The other "show car" is the cartoon car that is never driven and probably can't be, I know those are real "show cars" too, but I don't count them. Those cars are usually not very well detailed at all, they are more like a movie prop.

No, the real show car to me is a work of art, you can study the "Little dancer, aged 14 years" by Degas. It is so beautiful you can't take your eyes off it. You look and look for a flaw, something to tell you it isn't alive. But you never find it, you just walk away with the impression to stay with you forever.

This Ford F100 is just that car, it is a work of art. I was on the way out of the show and went thru the building it was in. I could care less about these trucks. If one was on fire I wouldn't put it out, saving the extinguisher for something more important. But this truck, this truck stopped me in my tracks and I wasn't even looking at it! All it took was one glance at the tail gate and bed as I walked by. I ended up staring at it for a half hour or so and talking to others who were looking at it. What was cool was one pair of guys knew these trucks well started pointing out the modifications on the truck that went right over my head. Of course it was so nice, the work was so tasteful that even the guys who knew them well didn't see them until after looking for quite some time. There were LOTS of modifications, most very subtle, very tasteful. It rounded out the whole truck.

What I like most about "detail" the art of just "fine tuning" is that it is FREE. Most anyone can do it. You don't need to be a metal master, or a painting master. You don't have to be fast, you don't have to be experienced, you simply need patience. That is all it takes, passion to get the fit better, the edges sharper, the welds ground smooth. All it takes is to prime and block, and surface until it is perfect. Most anyone of us can do this, sure some of it takes some learning, but it is mostly about patience.

The wild part is most bodymen and painters don't possess the patience and passion to do it! I have seen home hobbyists do better detail, more perfect jobs than most pros! They get the job done fast, they are way more efficient at it, but they lack the patience and passion.

This room was full of zillion dollar streetrods. It had many pro-built cars, BIG dollar cars, popular body styles and years, and this friggin 68 Ford pickup knocked me off my feet. You could jump on Criags list right now and get one for a grand, driving it home, a decent old truck. Yet this guy, took it and blew away the zillion dollar customs and streetrods in the room.

I looked and looked, deeper and deeper and finally found some texture in the paint. :D Up under the hood structure the clear wasn't cut flawlessly flat. Other than that, on the edges of the hood, the firewall, the front of the bed and back of the cab, inside the bed, EVERY SQUARE INCH was cut flawlessly with ZERO texture!

I will tell you right now, the guy who built this truck, I will put money on did all the work, body and paint. It was one mans passion, that is what it looks like to me. I can't believe you could find a few guys to do it that would all have the passion needed. It would be like assembling the Beetles or the Eagles to make music. It is lightening striking.

I believe the guy who did it, he is looking for the next car to build. It being finished isn't the destination, the journey is the destination. Once the journey is finished, I will put money on it that he is on to something else.

I am going to try to find the guy who owns it and see if I am right. :D

Brian

http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/atta...chmentid=37228

MARTINSR 03-28-2009 10:30 PM

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These are of the bed, it had some panels on the front and sides. I think the front covered a fuel tank and the sides were possibly some sort of compartments that were also covers for the "tubs" being it had pretty large wheels and tires. Check out the reflection in the tail gate of the end of that compartment and the reflection of the tailgate in the compartment.

Look at the tailgate gap. Look at the gaps and fit on those panels in the corner of the bed.

Brian

MARTINSR 03-28-2009 10:33 PM

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This is the back edge of the hood, the cowl top, fender apron to firewall, the firewall behind the engine, and another of the firewall.

Brian

MARTINSR 03-28-2009 10:37 PM

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How about the door gaps? EVERY INCH around these doors fit like that. Check out the mouldings. The guy made his own version of the cheapie aluminum mouldings these trucks had with the painted center section. He took aluminum or something making these thin mouldings one over the other having them chrome plated.

Absolutely BEAUTIFUL.

Brian

MARTINSR 03-28-2009 10:42 PM

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How's this for seam sealer in a drip rail? It was smoother than most cars body work!

Brian

carsavvycook 03-28-2009 11:00 PM

That looks very nice. :) and I agree, it takes an artist conception/vision to complete one of this eye catching quality.

Thank you for sharing it. :D

Hippie 03-29-2009 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MARTINSR
No, the real show car to me is a work of art, you can study the "Little dancer, aged 14 years" by Degas. It is so beautiful you can't take your eyes off it. You look and look for a flaw, something to tell you it isn't alive. But you never find it, you just walk away with the impression to stay with you forever.

Brian, this is the "Hotrodders" Bulletin Board. It's OK to talk about D/Gas, we know what that is. Degas the artist? Probably not so much........ ;) :D But a nice truck just the same. :thumbup:

wildthing 03-29-2009 07:51 AM

just beautiful , i can't imagine the work that went into that truck. i know the work that is going into my project and its only going to be a good 20 ' car.

vert1940 03-29-2009 07:52 AM

not sidestepping the perfect panels but,.......how do you get that thing together without messing something up?? i realize you use tape to help..but that is beyond help!!

dawg 03-29-2009 08:02 AM

bah its a trailer queen
probly got 5 miles on the motor.
we all could do work like that if it isnt driven.

Hippie 03-29-2009 08:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dawg
.........we all could do work like that if it isnt driven.

The only thing stopping me from doing a build like that is money, time, tools, talent and patience. Oh yeah, motivation and ambition.

cobalt327 03-29-2009 08:45 AM

Beautiful work.

Wouldn't have been my choice of vehicle, but let that take nothing away from the craftsmanship.

I wouldn't build one like that, even if I could. Too much coin and not enough extra shop space.

Besides, I have to drive all mine.

MARTINSR 03-29-2009 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hippie
Brian, this is the "Hotrodders" Bulletin Board. It's OK to talk about D/Gas, we know what that is. Degas the artist? Probably not so much........ ;) :D But a nice truck just the same. :thumbup:

"Art" is "Art"!

Degas, "Little dancer aged fourteen years" at the Smithsonion in Washington DC.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3231/...2ed314da6f.jpg

Brian

MARTINSR 03-29-2009 09:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vert1940
not sidestepping the perfect panels but,.......how do you get that thing together without messing something up?? i realize you use tape to help..but that is beyond help!!

It just takes being careful, that is all there is to it. Help from friends, is a biggie.

You want to talk about the actual process? The most important step, the ABSOLUTE CAN NOT BE PASSED UP, CAN NOT BE TAKEN LIGHTLY step?

Simple, TRIAL FITTING PARTS! Sounds obvious, but many of us will rush thru portions of the process for one reason or another. First reason, "awe, it fit before" but things change or you may not have been looking at it with a critical enough eye. Second reason trial fitting gets rushed, it is an odd concept but hear me out and think about it for a while.

When we are looking at our car for flaws, we don't WANT to find them! That is the biggest reason that I have found in teaching apprentices in the shop. This concept hit me years ago and it has helped tremendously in teaching. If you are feeling your body work for flaws, it is human nature to NOT want to find any after all the blocking and hard work, right? Well if you DON'T want to find a flaw, you will do just that, not find one! You then prime it and paint it and WHAM, there is that flaw you didn't WANT to find!

You have to WANT to find flaws! You have to be passionate about the WANT to find them. If you are, if you REALLY want to find a flaw as you are feeling body work or trial fitting that panel, you WILL find the flaws and correct them.

You've no doubt seen the famous Henry Ford quote: "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right." BELIEVE IT!

If you THINK you can move a mountain, your brain starts figuring out ways to DO IT. If you think you can't, your brain starts making excuses why you can't.

You have to WANT to find the flaws and you then will and correct them before the parts are painted, and before the parts are bolted on for good.

Here is a little article on the subject of trial fitting parts. "Basics of Basics" trail fitting parts (click here)

Brian

cobalt327 03-29-2009 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MARTINSR
You've no doubt seen the famous Henry Ford quote: "Whether you think that you can, or that you can't, you are usually right."

I thought that quote was from Stewie Griffin :D .


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