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Old 01-19-2012, 10:14 AM
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Need Hood Scoop For Clearance.

Alright I know that this question has been brought up more than once. And in hopes of maybe someone has came across some new ideas of things hopefully can shed a little bit of light here. Basically I dont have enough clearance with my intake/carb for my hood to latch safely. I already use a very small breather on it, so I cant really downgrade the size of that in anyway. One of the most common questions I see is that "Can you bond fiberglass to metal". And have seen all of the pros and cons that you can come across. Im not real fond of having a fibergalss to metal combo from what Iv read, but thats almost all I see that you can buy. ( also, never have I done any kind of body work so Id have to get all the tools necessary to complete the job ) Yet, Im still a little hesitant on a bolt-on only because Id think that moisture would somehow drip on top of the intake, maybe not much but still at least some. But any ideas/tips/tricks would be great. Maybe a refrence to what is a personal favorite. Thanks!

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Old 01-19-2012, 10:52 AM
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You donít say what kind of car, but I went thru this on my 57 Plymouth. Basically there seems to be 4 choices.

Bonding and molding in with fiberglass, which usually eventually ends cracks.

Welding a metal scoop to a metal hood with usually results in a lot of warpage that will need to be worked out.

A scoop attached to the engine like the Ford and Mopar shakers and Trans Am Scoops.

Bolting a scoop on. Ford used the bolt on method for several years in the 60s-70s.

As far as the bolt on scoops (which I eventually did with a 62 T Bird Scoop), they donít seem to leak as long as edge is sealed even reasonably well. As far as water entering the scoop while driving, the air hit the forward edge of the hood and actually flows over the scoop carrying the rain water with itÖ..i.e. the air filter and engine stay dry even in a downpour (my air filter actually sits up in the scoop and the engine and filter have always stayed dry.

As far as how I did mine, after I cut out the scoop from a doner hood, I welded studs to the bottom of it for attachments.

The biggest thing is find a scoop that looks good on the car.
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:59 AM
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Google bolt on hood scoop and check out whats out there, don't know what your putting it on but that's ok, you might end up with a bolt on from a different brand car anyway JMO but that wouldn't matter anyway as long as it looks and fits good and does the job for you correct ?




Cole
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Old 01-19-2012, 11:14 AM
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It's a 91 camaro gone carb'd so nothing inside of it is original. Iv been on summit/jegs and I find that summit has some of the style I'm looking for. Kind of like the z28 style. But really anything is better than nothing.

After hearing the bolt on ones don't drip too much I think im leaning towards those. If they are bolt on, can they be both fiberglass or metal? I'm almost wondering how well a welded on scoop be the way to go?
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Old 01-19-2012, 03:48 PM
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why not get a steel hood that has the ZL1 scoop formed into it?
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Old 01-19-2012, 04:58 PM
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You can bond fiberglass to steel, and it wont crack anytime soon, IF you take all the proper steps in attaching it. I did the hood on my '71 Camaro using a fiberglass L88 cowl style in 1982, and it was still good when I sold the hood to a frriend last fall.
The proper method is to lay the scoop on the hood, then outline it with a felt marker and grind all the paint off a couple inches inside the line, and 4"-6" outside the line. Then position the scoop again and drill holes for pop rivets every 2", but DO NOT install the rivets permanently. Simply put them in the holes to hold it in place. Once the holes are all drilled, remove the scoop and mix up JB Weld or good epoxy, and spread it on the entire edge, then situate the scoop in place and install all rivets permanently. Wipe off excess epoxy and let it set up.
After the epoxy is set you can get your resin, and glass cloth (not glass mat) and cut strips about 2"-3" wide. Start your first strip along the edge and overlap hood and scoop equally, being careful to saturate the cloth. Then alternately overlap the strips to get several layers built up. Sand the roughness smooth, and blend with Duraglass that will bond to both steel and glass, and be stronger. Final finish can be thin use of regular filler, as used in any bodywork.
If done properly the end result wont break out, even with rough usage.
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:35 PM
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In my shop, we have a guarantee for bonded on fiberglass hood scoops. We guarantee they will crack. The expansion/contraction rate of the two materials is radically different. Burying rivets in the bond area doesn't work either, for the same reason. The hood is exposed to engine heat, baking sunlight, vibration from the engine and road, flexing from opening and closing. With all that, even the best bond is not going to last.

A few months ago, the cover car on Street Rodder magazine had a clearance bubble on the hood side panel. It was bolted on from the inside, leaving some nice looking stainless head fasteners exposed around the perimeter.

We're working on an aluminum hood scoop to be installed in the middle of a '96 Dodge Dakota hood. It will be attached using this method. So far, I'm planning to leave the scoop brushed aluminum, but we will see.
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:55 PM
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I guess I was mistaken, mine must be going to crack any day, even if it has lasted 30 yrs. to date.
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:12 AM
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There are always exceptions. But even using JB Weld for the bond has it's limits.

You say you used fiberglass cloth. The weave of glass cloth will show through if it's not buried under a heavy layer of fill material. The earliest '53 Corvettes are noted for having this weave showing. It's a plus for them since it's authentic.

If your hood scoop is still intact and uncracked, it may be because of a heavy layer of material over the bond and the rivets. If the rivets weren't sealed from the underside, moisture will eventually find it's way to the steel and cause corrosion.

Of course, your hood may be the exception. I'd like to see it.

Thinking of bonding steel to fiberglass... have you ever seen dropped headlights on an original '68 Corvette. It seems GM didn't figure out how to bond steel to the underside of the fiberglass nose panel until 1969. Come to think of it, when was the last time you saw a '68 Vette?
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:57 AM
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The JB Weld would not work by itself, but neither would the pop rivets, or the glass and resin. The JB is simply to give the cowl a good secure base prior to laying up glass cloth. It's all of it together that has worked or me, and given great results. I also have old Heddman flares on the rear that I installed in 1976, and glassed them in the same way. The hood is gone to a friend, but the car was repainted two years ago after a frontend crunch, and nothing needed addressing before paint as it was all still holding up nicely.
I've done a fair amount of glass to metal work for people, and most of it was because they've seen that it's working and holding up on my car. Most people don't keep their cars for 38 yrs., so they don't have them long enough to really see if how they did it really works.
Here's a picture after the fender bender, and the hood wasn't hit hard, but it still held up without cracking the bond.:


And one of the flares as I was prepping for the paint in fall of 2009:


The change to a cowl hood wasn't due to the old hood having any issues, just a new look:
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Old 01-23-2012, 11:27 AM
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If someone held me at gun point and forced me to bond a fiberglass scoop to a hood, I'd do it the way you did. I think you said your bond and blend area is as much as six inches wide. That, and your choice of materials are the reasons your scoop hasn't shown a crack. And I'd guess your total thickness at the edge of the scoop is close to 1/4". Blending from that edge to the original sheetmetal is a lot of work and it changes the contour of the original hood. That's not always desired or acceptable.

I didn't say it couldn't be done. I said my guarantee is that it will crack eventually. There's an exception to every rule. Congrats.

I'm reminded of the story of the turtles who went to the ice cream parlour. The youngest turtle had forgotten his money at home. He made the other turtles promise not to eat their ice cream until he got back and joined them. After about 2 months, the oldest turtle said he wasn't waiting any longer and took a bite. The youngest turtle, who had been hiding and watching just outside the ice cream parlour, jumped out and said "Ah Haa!!... I knew you wouldn't wait!"
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Old 01-23-2012, 11:50 AM
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Yes, it was/is a lot of work. My thickness was not that much, as the epoxy is mostly displced when pulling down the rivets, and once it set up the abrupt edge on the glass cowl was knocked down to a tapered edge so the blending would be easier. Still it does blend out several inches from the edg of the glass cowl.
Very time consuming to get the glass and metal blended without having to use much Duraglass to fine tune the shape, and not also cut into the glass cloth I laid up. That rear spoiler is also a glass/metal piece. A stock D80 one piece spoiler with 3/16" aluminum laid across the back edge and extended up 2.5" over stock to give it a one of a kind look.
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