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-   -   Need Some Advice Before Shooting FeatherFill G2!! (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/need-some-advice-before-shooting-featherfill-g2-198518.html)

texastomeh 05-14-2011 05:49 PM

Need Some Advice Before Shooting FeatherFill G2!!
 
I need advice before shooting FeatherFill G2 over SPI Epoxy Primer.

What size tip, pressure (at gun), reduction (if any and with what), siphon or gravity gun, HVLP or regular when shooting @ ~ 85-90 deg. F.

I have read the Tech Sheets and used the "Search" function, but in addition would appreciate a little "real world" wisdom. :cool:

Thanx in advance for your help! :thumbup:

Tom

tech69 05-15-2011 03:35 AM

1.8-2.2

I use 1.8 cause I feel my body work is good enough where I can use a small tip and it saves primer but a 2.0 is better, I admit. When it's in the 80's+ I use a full cap full of lacquer thinner for every 12-15 ounces and this greatly reduces dry spray. Better to start on the side with less and evaluate how it sprays immediately. If it's too dry at the edge of your fan add more thinner and mix it in your cup. Any gun is fine at the recommended psi. Mix less in hotter weather. Not a great idea to add less hardener and mix a bunch. If you're doing a complete and mixing individual 24 oz cups or above, AND it's hott, completely clean your gun out after two mixing/ spray sessions or you will start shooting out little hardened pieces of primer. WHen it's not hot you can spray your whole car mixing a couple times without cleaning your gun til the end, but not in hot weather. It's very spray friendly. Doesn't run and is not finicky as a 2k.

texastomeh 05-15-2011 09:38 AM

Thanx tech69, that's the kind of advice I'm looking for! :thumbup:

Anybody else?

PLEASE keep it coming!!

Tom

tech69 05-15-2011 11:33 AM

I guess I should have noted I "usually" use a cap full per 12-14 oz for a 1.8 tip and in hotter weather. In normal weather I use a cap full for 24 oz. With a 2.0 tip you won't need as much. Always good to start with less and then add more if you find it dry on the edges, but don't add too much. Also, not only is gonna contribute to less dry spray it will slow the curing process in your gun and you won't have to turn up your pressure if it starts to thicken in the gun.

xpsyclonex2002 05-15-2011 04:19 PM

I shot it over SPI on my car. That stuff is THICK and pretty hard to sand relative to the SPI epoxy Primer. If you don't get it to lay down pretty smooth, your shoulder is gonna hate you. The gun I used couldn't handle it. It came out irregularly and made it a bear to sand.

deadbodyman 05-15-2011 05:34 PM

I'd return it....and get ANY 2k urathane primer instead. it sands like a brick its hard to get out of the gun and always has a rough undercoating like texture,plus is hard to get the hardener just right for smaller jobs.at least use a gravity gun if you do use it,you'll end up throwing a siphon gun and dont forget to clean the gun when your done if you ever want to use it again....I cant think of ANY good reason to use it or any advantage it has over any 2k primer even the absolute cheapest ones...especially after using a good epoxy.It also cracks and chips easier than anything else....Try sanding it with 320 sometime .... :sweat: Sorry but thats what I truely think of it and I like evercoats products...

tech69 05-15-2011 05:59 PM

I agree with the chipping part but it has way more fill properties than a 2k, and a 2k is way more finicky. It also sands better than 2k's hands down. I think poly primer is best served for getting it straight with two rounds, or however long it takes a person, THEN top coat it with a 2k primer for your final sanding.

It sprays fine if you know how to use it. His problem with it is not the product, I can guarantee that.

deadbodyman 05-16-2011 04:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tech69
I agree with the chipping part but it has way more fill properties than a 2k, .

Dont you use bondo ,tech??? What situation would anyone ever need that much fill??? I will say one good quality it has,it dont shrink...at all.....Today I was at the paint store and saw feather fill in a 4:1 mix ratio ..must be new....maybe its easier to sand now too...I know they've changed the formula a few times since used it last ... :confused:

texastomeh 05-16-2011 05:55 PM

Guys,

I didn't mean to "poke the bear"!! :D :D

I am just looking to shoot some Polyester and long board blocking it to mainly help straighten/flatten some panel "rolls/waves". I thought that Poly would be easier and faster than "spread-on" filler. I've already filled and feathered the low "spots' and "dents". :eek:

HELP!!!! :confused: :confused:

Tom

tech69 05-16-2011 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deadbodyman
Dont you use bondo ,tech??? What situation would anyone ever need that much fill??? I will say one good quality it has,it dont shrink...at all.....Today I was at the paint store and saw feather fill in a 4:1 mix ratio ..must be new....maybe its easier to sand now too...I know they've changed the formula a few times since used it last ... :confused:

A lot of top restoration shops use it and my bodywork is fine. We're talking to take care of stuff your hand can't feel, and hand feel is for dealing with mudwork. Straightening beyond that comes from primer. My work is as straight as anyones and you can get there quicker with featherfill. By the time the straightening is done, if you know what you're doing, most of the primer is on the floor and it's not excessively thick. Topcoating it with a 2k gives it a pliable surface for rock chips. So in a sense you're right but you'll get that better end result much quicker implementing a poly primer in your early primer apps.

swvalcon 05-18-2011 07:23 AM

You can thin it out if need be check with their web site and see what to use. Goes no much smoother that way. Just give it a couple more coats.

mr4speed 05-18-2011 04:12 PM

If your set on using a spray poly you may want to try some Omni MP243 sprays just like a 2K primer. Believe me I have tried most of them and by far this is the best one hands down. Blocks out real nice with 180 grit as well.

deadbodyman 05-19-2011 06:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by texastomeh
Guys,

I didn't mean to "poke the bear"!! :D :D

I am just looking to shoot some Polyester and long board blocking it to mainly help straighten/flatten some panel "rolls/waves". I thought that Poly would be easier and faster than "spread-on" filler. I've already filled and feathered the low "spots' and "dents". :eek:

HELP!!!! :confused: :confused:

Tom

If your not using bondo and poly putty for that type of work and
If your set on using it ,go ahead .We call it spray bondo,over here..the guys that have used it and like it have told you about everything you need to know,bigger tip size and thinning will be your biggest help but be double sure to get the ratio right when mixing and be sure to tape everything up well as you would with any primer (overspray is tough to clean up with any primer) and a guide coat before blocking will be your savior...
Maybe you should have asked :whats the best primer to use before you bought the feather fill ,not many of us like it or need that kind fill power But I gotta say I remember when I thought it was great too,about 30 yrs ago,until everyone started having problems with it.
Anyways,if you have epoxied it then done your filler work you should epoxy it again before putting any other kind of primer on ,thats how the pros do it for the best results.and use a wax& grease remover every time you get ready to spray anything...Back when we used it we started blocking it with 80grit because it sanded so hard,I dont know what they start blocking it with these days...That would be a big help for you to know too.
I'm assuming your doing a whole car,doing one or two panels is a little different..

texastomeh 05-19-2011 12:00 PM

Quote:

Maybe you should have asked :whats the best primer to use before you bought the feather fill
GOOD POINT!!

Well, I'm asking now! What is the best primer and/or product/method to use for filling(?)/smoothing(?) relatively minor panel "ripples"(?)/"waves"(?) once the "dents" and "dings" have been filled and feathered? I have already overcoated with SPI Epoxy Primer.From what I had read using the SEARCH function and the Evercoat website, I thought that FEATHER FILL was to way to go, but appears I may have been wrong.

BTW: I HAVE NOT bought the Feather Fill yet!!

Thanx,

Tom

deadbodyman 05-20-2011 06:25 AM

any primer that I would use or suggest would only be my personal opinion.what you should do is start a new thread and ask that question.This way you'll get everyones opinion of their experiances with different brands.I use two brands of urathane primer for production work and only one for super straight high quality work...SPI has about the best urathane high build primer Ive used so far ,it sands easy and it shrinkage is minimal ,its great for blocking a whole car down and gettting everything super straight...It is a little to thick for my production work though because for that I use a poly putty (evercoat) in place of primer for blocking ,its cheaper and faster for me ,when I prime its sanded with 320 -400 so I need a thinner primer not for straightening but filling any small scratches and something for the paint to stick to...

you havent mentioned anything about filling your dents just featheredging them.something that would help you imencely would be to guide coat "Everything" at "Every" stage of the operation,it'll be a lot faster and easier and take a lot of the guess work and mystery out of this. for instance guide coat your first coat of eopxy to find your high and low spots work the metal the best you can (this part is what really seperates the old timers from the newbies) on the bigger dents and waves use bondo (I like evercoats z grip) on your smaller stuff that doesnt need much filling use a poly putty (like evercoats ez sand).sand with 80..Guide coat your bondo and putty....re prime when done with more epoxy (Spi is great stuff) guide coat the epoxy and block again (180)(I like the black epoxy with a white guide coat) depending on everything you did so far and the kind of shape the car was in determines what kind of primer comes next...if you have any epoxy left use it all up,Spi can be use as a fill primer and you dont want to waste it by leaving it unused.many times you wont need any other primer but if its not straight enough use the urathane high build primer,guide coat and keep blocking with 180 ...this should get you in the ballpark for wet (block) sanding 320-400 ...You cant go wrong with SPI primers ,they're not super expensive and are of the highest quality and they have a tel,# you can call to get instant answears to any questions that can arise...You can use lower quality,cheaper materials and still get good results but this is a lot of work and no pro would take a chance on them.plus using cheaper, low end materials might even mean extra work...its just not worth it..But start a new thread and see what everyone else says they like ,weigh the pros and cons and make an informed decision based our knowlage and your budget..None of us know everything and whats right for me might not be right for you...


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