New to bodywork, need some advice - Page 2 - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 04-07-2013, 09:52 AM
Faith - Respect - Trust
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ontario
Age: 58
Posts: 3,508
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 192
Thanked 638 Times in 572 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR View Post
I have sold a lot of items on ebay shipping them all over the world, I am not kidding shipping to Canada is the biggest pain, it's right there, I have driven into Canada yet is is easier and cheaper to send something around the earth to Japan or something, wild.

Brian
It's no different if you live here either Brian...I can wire money to anywhere in the World cheaper than I can wire money 50 miles from where I live by Western Union.

I can fly almost anywhere in the World cheaper than I can fly 500 miles away from where I live in Canada...I don't get it either.

Ray

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 12:15 PM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Vero, FL
Age: 47
Posts: 227
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Kevin, don't let all the "Pros" who do this stuff for a living intimidate you into thinking you can't do this. When I was fourteen years old my dad brought home a basket case 69' Camaro on a trailer, bought me a can of bondo, some sandpaper and metalworking tools and said have at it. I ended up working at a body shop after I finished this car, the car got me hired. Anybody can learn body work, any body can do body work. Not everybody can do it perfect though. Even if you don't find you like doing it, a competent repair job is still possible.

Getting sheet metal straight ain't that hard. Doing it the "right way" takes allot of time and will be hard for a newbie though. It's hard work. You don't have to hand hammer and massage every dent out like it's a chip foose project. Anything up to an 1/8" of filler is an acceptable repair.

Looking at the pictures, the cheapest way to do this is to fix it yourself. You will need to take it down to bare metal and give a skim coat of filler over most of the body panels and then block sand until it is straight. Anything you can feel with your hand will be seen by the naked eye when paint is applied. Nothing too difficult to accomplish here.

Follow the instructions on all the cans of product and take your time, patience is everything on the bodywork. Get a bodywork handbook from the library or your local book store.

If you don't plan on laying on the paint after it's prepped, you may want to find a paint shop that will work with you and give you advice as well as working out with them what primers you are going to use before they top coat it. Some shops will not touch a DIY prep job. Some shops will be more than happy to do any welding for you too. While getting harder to find not every shop is some snotty resto-boutique with noses help up high in the air sniffing out the depth of people's pockets.

Grind off some paint, add some filler and start sanding. A two by four makes a great poor man's sanding block on the large flat areas. Contemplating a job of this scope is more torture than just getting out there and doing it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 12:49 PM
put up or shut up
 

Last journal entry: saying goodbye to the beast
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Antelope, Ca
Posts: 2,076
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 577
Thanked 232 Times in 211 Posts
no one is trying to intimidate him. He said he wanted no short cuts and is paying a lot for this project. Well, the only shortcut I see is his own work. Everyone who does this work at one point could NOT control the outcome and there's nothing worse than thinking something is gonna turn out good but it doesn't. THAT is why it was suggested he have somebody do it. Anybody can do it, but that doesn't mean they're doing it good or to their liking.

I've seen so many guys spend tons of money and they all hit a road block when it comes to the body work. When it's done it looks like crap or maybe they should have airbrushed a surfer on the side to go along with all those waves-lol and mind you we're talking about waves you can see in pics. If you can see it in a pic it's probably a tsunami in real life.

I would suggest he take to a "pro" or else expect waves. Plain and simple. Does it himself there WILL be waves.

Last edited by tech69; 04-09-2013 at 01:04 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 02:56 PM
Faith - Respect - Trust
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ontario
Age: 58
Posts: 3,508
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 192
Thanked 638 Times in 572 Posts
I have to agree, I don't think anybody here was trying to intimidate the OP. When I first read this thread, several members had already posted and I felt I didn't have anything to add that would have made a difference and agreed with what was posted. I read what the Op said very carefully and because of what the OP said, I'm sure that this is what prompted the responses that he got. I respect the Op for stating how he felt about what he was doing, how he wanted things to be done right, the fact that he would obsess if what he had done so far, or what he may do in the future wouldn't be done correctly. Giving advice on how to do things is difficult, wording it so that whomever your trying to give advice to completely understands often is next to impossible, no matter how much command you may have of the English language, what you write and what the person reading what you wrote, may be translated in a completely different light.

Telling somebody how to do things is like school...showing people how to do things is more like real life and in my opinion goes a lot further in teaching. Sometimes trying to pass on knowledge can be frustrating, on the internet, anyone who has done this before for a living has the benefit of is, writing and posting pictures. The hands on of stopping someone when you see that they are making an error, to show them a better way or to just say, stop now or your going to over sand that panel can't be done in the environment that we have here. Very often, what some people may feel are "pro's" hear, is coming after the fact when the person asking how, has done it wrong, maybe it wasn't explained in the terms that the person asking could fully understand. Maybe the person asking how, thought he understood but didn't. When I hear someone who has started a thread say, "I ask these questions only because I will obsess over it unless I know it is Good", and the advice given, I'm sure was given with the best intentions for the OP and have reread every post, not one member in my mind crossed a line and tried to intimidate the OP.

What I'm more happy about is that not one post said, "this is easy, all you have to do is"...those are the posts that do more damage than people telling someone that they have a big job in front of them and give alternative suggestions. Those box sides would be tough, even for a seasoned "pro" and I know many seasoned pro's that either wouldn't touch them or if they did wouldn't get them straight...yet they have a piece of paper that says they are pro's. Every person that offered advice knew how tough those box sides are and reading your post, your the only one that has made it sound not nearly as difficult as it is.

Comments like "Anybody can learn body work" and "Getting sheet metal straight ain't that hard" or "Nothing too difficult to accomplish here". I had a few more but I'm sure that my point is made. You may feel that these quotes have been taken out of context but, how do you know how a person will interpret what you wrote. Everyone of the three quotes is wrong. Not just anybody can do or learn body work, I've met numerous good people that just can't do it, no matter how hard they tried. Getting large 6 foot surfaces of sheet metal straight is difficult, you need patience, you need passion, you need experience and know what you are doing.

My hats off to the professionals that took the time to give the OP their opinions and offer advice so that the job would turn out best for the person concerned. My hats also off to the OP, his comment about obsessing tells me that he does have the passion, I would hate for an individual such as this, who obviously cars about this vehicle go ahead, grab a 2 X 4, prep his truck and not be happy with the results. It may demoralize an individual to the point that they might never want to attempt anything like this again.

Only wishing the best for the OP.

Ray
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 09:01 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 18
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Are you sure that is the right tool ? I can think of many other tools and methods. How about a guide coat and a simple block sander? AY! It does not take expensive tools to find high and low spot's!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 09:03 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 18
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That's hilarious!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #22 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 09:04 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 18
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There is no replacement for common sense!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 09:21 PM
Faith - Respect - Trust
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ontario
Age: 58
Posts: 3,508
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 192
Thanked 638 Times in 572 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodgrdodger View Post
Are you sure that is the right tool ? I can think of many other tools and methods. How about a guide coat and a simple block sander? AY! It does not take expensive tools to find high and low spot's!
I don't know what you mean by "are you sure that is the right tool, but I will agree with you that it doesn't take expensive equipment to find high and low spots. My long board is a piece of aluminum machined smooth with wooden handles, it cost me a total of $15.00 and I've had it for almost 20 years.

Your also right about common sense, when it comes to doing body work and painting vehicles, it seems that the more experience I have, the more common sense seems to come easier.

Ray
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #24 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 09:43 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 18
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I should get one and try it I guess. I have all them expensive lever tools too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 09:59 PM
put up or shut up
 

Last journal entry: saying goodbye to the beast
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Antelope, Ca
Posts: 2,076
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 577
Thanked 232 Times in 211 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodgrdodger View Post
Are you sure that is the right tool ? I can think of many other tools and methods. How about a guide coat and a simple block sander? AY! It does not take expensive tools to find high and low spot's!
sometimes guide coat won't show you what your hand feels and vise versa. After a while you learn what guide coat won't show you and you use your hands for certain areas. Take for instance a wheel crown. you can guide coat all you want but it might not tell you anything is wrong with it but when you paint it and really look at it the area might be wavy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #26 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 10:16 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 15
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanks to everyone for their input. I consider myself very handy and I don't fail at much. I weld, do fine wood work, build engines (including the 650hp 521 for this truck) but this is making me stop and think.

I will be honest, a lot of the comments did make me doubt myself. Gold duster did make me think again that maybe I can get it done. Pulling the dents is easy, right? The picture show a fair representation of the panel, with wet primer on it you can get a good idea of what it looks like. It was close to the other side that I haven't touched yet so there is improvement there.

I understand to much heat is a bad thing, over pulling on the dents will stretch the metal, there is only so much metal there so don't remove to much..... and so on.

What I have decided to do is get as much done on it as I can and then take it to a resto shop and have them finish it. If I can save them 10 hrs work that's money in my pocket.

I have a thick skin so be honest. You don't do anyone a favor by telling them they are doing a good job when in reality they can't color within the lines.

The comment about pros with their nose in the air is a fair one but we all know they're not all like that. The first shop (guy) I spoke to about this truck was a dick in a well known shop in Edmonton. The first question he asked me was "why would I fix up this truck". Don't get me wrong, they do very nice work and turn out some nice cars but I will never deal with him again because of the attitude. If I wanted to fix up an AMC Gremlin he shouldn't ask why.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #27 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 10:20 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 18
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That is good advice!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #28 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 10:43 PM
MARTINSR's Avatar
Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San francisco bay area
Age: 55
Posts: 13,208
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1,340
Thanked 1,169 Times in 1,031 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodgrdodger View Post
Are you sure that is the right tool ? I can think of many other tools and methods. How about a guide coat and a simple block sander? AY! It does not take expensive tools to find high and low spot's!
You need a little education in forums don't you. Hit the "quote" button in the lower right corner of the post you want to say something about. If you don't do that we have no idea what the heck you are talking about.

Brian
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #29 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 11:53 PM
Faith - Respect - Trust
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ontario
Age: 58
Posts: 3,508
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 192
Thanked 638 Times in 572 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin316 View Post
Thanks to everyone for their input. I consider myself very handy and I don't fail at much. I weld, do fine wood work, build engines (including the 650hp 521 for this truck) but this is making me stop and think.

I will be honest, a lot of the comments did make me doubt myself. Gold duster did make me think again that maybe I can get it done. Pulling the dents is easy, right? The picture show a fair representation of the panel, with wet primer on it you can get a good idea of what it looks like. It was close to the other side that I haven't touched yet so there is improvement there.

I understand to much heat is a bad thing, over pulling on the dents will stretch the metal, there is only so much metal there so don't remove to much..... and so on.

What I have decided to do is get as much done on it as I can and then take it to a resto shop and have them finish it. If I can save them 10 hrs work that's money in my pocket.

I have a thick skin so be honest. You don't do anyone a favor by telling them they are doing a good job when in reality they can't color within the lines.

The comment about pros with their nose in the air is a fair one but we all know they're not all like that. The first shop (guy) I spoke to about this truck was a dick in a well known shop in Edmonton. The first question he asked me was "why would I fix up this truck". Don't get me wrong, they do very nice work and turn out some nice cars but I will never deal with him again because of the attitude. If I wanted to fix up an AMC Gremlin he shouldn't ask why.
Kevin, as much as people here are trying to help you, sometimes the advice we give you comes from the comments that you made. We have no idea about how qualified you are or aren't. Your thread is titled "New to Body work..". To me that would mean that you do not have a lot of experience, you went on to say that if it wasn't done properly, you'd obsess over it. Not knowing you personally and all that anyone that did give advice had to go on was what they read. We can give you a lot of advice, but without experience and knowing exactly what to look for while your working on your 6 foot box sides chances are it's not going to be as straight as you would like, guide coat or no guide coat. No one here was holding there nose high in the air and being condescending, all they where doing was giving you the facts. They only had your best interest at heart and wanted you to have the results that you where hoping to achieve.

One of the things I detest is when people post and make comments about how easy it is, when that fact is that it can be difficult...even for a professional. Pulling dents, may or may not be easy, it depends on the dent, when you pull a dent your not just moving the metal where the dent is, your moving metal around the dent as well and on a 6 foot box side with a lot of dents, your moving a lot of metal. I did a quarter panel on a Cadillac a number of years ago, it wasn't nearly as bad as your box side. I had repaired tougher quarters than this one, but for some reason, it gave me a lot of grief. That type of thing can happen in this trade and in reading the posts, I don't feel that people where trying to discourage you, they where in my opinion being honest with you and coloring within the lines. By the way, 2 X 4 don't make a good block for large flat areas.

Yes, there are people and shops that have that mightier than thou attitude and I don't have much use for them. On that note, I'd be very interested in knowing which shop in Edmonton gave you attitude. When I was repping paint I repped in Edmonton for almost 10 years and know many of the shops there. You mentioned that you might be looking for a shop that would help you finish, perhaps, if you don't have one in mind, I might be able to help you out. If your interested, send me a PM and we can discuss it further. I do honestly respect your initiative for taking this project on and asking for advice.

When your working at getting stellar results in this trade, getting large areas of metal straight is anything but easy...as far as I'm concerned it's only easy if your satisfied by mediocre results. If it was that easy, the old saying comes into play, then anybody could do it.

So if your interested in my offer, let me know.

Best Regards

Ray
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #30 (permalink)  
Old 04-10-2013, 08:02 AM
boothboy's Avatar
More bucks, go faster!
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Grass Valley, CA.
Posts: 599
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 185
Thanked 278 Times in 249 Posts
I'm sure your head's spinning after all this excellent and well meaning advice. Mine would be. Why don't you spend a few bucks and get a gallon of bondo a long board a rattle can of flat black and try a section . If your happy with the results move over a couple of feet and work on that area. If everything looks like camel crap and your going nuts find that shop to finish the job. If the results are close to what you want keep on trucking!
You might find you like and have the aptitude for bodywork. You also might find out you flat out don't like bondo dust in your ears so turn it over to the pro's. If you do fine carpentry I'll bet you'll do ok.
You'll never until you try.

BB ( whose bodywork mostly looks like camel crap but's to cheap to turn it over to the pro's)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to boothboy For This Useful Post:
69 widetrack (04-10-2013)

Recent Body - Exterior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
bodywork dodge c1b6 Hotrodding Basics 5 09-23-2011 04:43 PM
bodywork aaronr Body - Exterior 1 04-30-2008 04:25 PM
Help With Bodywork aphockey Body - Exterior 9 05-21-2007 08:25 AM
bodywork 73chargerpimper Body - Exterior 1 06-18-2005 10:09 AM
I need advice on bodywork schedule rusttorod Body - Exterior 12 04-20-2004 10:20 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.