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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 05-24-2007, 03:45 PM
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I ran a 2" duct along one wall at floor level and installed a large shop vac in the outside shed with my compressor. I keep a section of hose that I can hook up at any of 4 places along this duct which gives me a VERY quiet and dust free vacuum for cleaning the shop, work tables, vehicles or about anything one would use a vacuum on, one of the handiest gadgets I have in my garage.

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 05-24-2007, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rusttorod
Rambo,
I've never seen a compressor setup like that. What's all the copper piping for?
I'll take your advice and just mount the hose reel on the wall close to the compressor, that's all I have in my old shop, and it's been fine.
-Shane
A filter/regulator alone will not remove enough moisture and you'll get water/contaminants in your airline out to the tools.

The "stil" I made with the copper pipe cools the air and causes any moisture to condensate in the down tube portions where the drains are located.

This particular setup is working really well for me right now and amounts to about 32 ft of copper pipe.

I still plan on adding a refrigerated air line dryer later this summer when I move the compressor outside to it's new home.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2007, 09:40 AM
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When's the party?
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2007, 10:55 AM
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Recepts every two feet might seem overkill but I have mine every 4 feet and I have run out of plugs around the work bench. Maybe use a 4 x 4 box with 2 recepts (4 plugs) in that general area every 4 feet.
I installed a power strip on the back splash of one work bench at home, at work we put the power strips in the front of work benches so the cords don't go across the top.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2007, 11:16 AM
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Great ideas 428!
I'm headed to Lowe's tonight to get the electrical parts. Any recommendation about the wire specs? I noticed there's lots of different types.
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Old 05-25-2007, 11:20 AM
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12/2 with ground. Majority of the time this type of wire is yellow! Protect each circuit with a GFCI plug at the first outlet to the circuit!
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2007, 02:44 PM
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Ah, color coded for different types - Brilliant! The existing wire in my shop is yellow. Also 1 red wire for the 220. Can I branch off that one to add a second 220 outlet, or do those need their own breaker? I need one for my compressor, the other for whatever in the future, tig maybe.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 05-25-2007, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rusttorod
Ah, color coded for different types - Brilliant! The existing wire in my shop is yellow. Also 1 red wire for the 220. Can I branch off that one to add a second 220 outlet, or do those need their own breaker? I need one for my compressor, the other for whatever in the future, tig maybe.
1 red wire?

Should be 4

1 black - hot
1 red - hot
1 white - neutral
1 green - ground

220v wire size depends on the length of the run.

Regardless - you do NOT want to piggy back any 220v recepticle. you need seperate breakers...

If you don't have a sub-panel you'll want to add at least an 8 pole one.
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Old 05-26-2007, 08:07 AM
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Just a quick tip. You are only allowed a certain number of recepticles on each breaker. Check your code requirements and install as per the code. Although you may say i will only use one at a time try and explain that to an insurance company if you need to put in a claim for a fire claim. CYA is the name of the game.
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Old 05-26-2007, 10:35 AM
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The rule of thumb is 10 recepts on a 12 gauge wire with a 20 amp breaker.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 05-26-2007, 10:59 PM
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As far as your A/C goes- one of the ductless ac/ heat pump units would be much easier to install. It only requires a small hole through the wall for hoses. The fan even oscillates. Plus you can mount it on the wall, out of the way
They're not as cheap as the window units... But it could be worth it just for the sake of an easy install. Just something to think about.

We used these in Kuwait, when it was 130*

Nooj
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 05-28-2007, 06:00 AM
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Check out The Garage Journal and look in their galleries. Some waaayyyy nice garages out there You will be sure to get an idea or two from there. I know I did. BTW...nice garage!!! I wish mine had upstairs storage, or at least a tall enough roof to put a hoist in.

Kevin
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 05-29-2007, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo_The_Dog
A filter/regulator alone will not remove enough moisture and you'll get water/contaminants in your airline out to the tools.

The "stil" I made with the copper pipe cools the air and causes any moisture to condensate in the down tube portions where the drains are located.

This particular setup is working really well for me right now and amounts to about 32 ft of copper pipe.

I still plan on adding a refrigerated air line dryer later this summer when I move the compressor outside to it's new home.
i have actually done two of those types of comperssor dryers.
one that we used a furnace blower motor thru the copper tubes with a single drian...
and one using (hehe) old house radiator (finnied) from radiatant water tube..an blower from a furnace.
works beyound belief...
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 05-29-2007, 12:51 PM
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One of the simplest systems I ever saw, and a very effective one too, is to coil the Copper pipe inside a barrel of water. I have seen this one several times and it works really good, kind of crude but cheap and very effective.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 06-06-2007, 06:21 AM
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Garage

I used rustolem on my floor it was easy but it scuffs and chips fron metal wheels and slag,its also very slippery when wet! As far as air lines check into a system called garage-pak I think it all goes together easy made for air for garages. You can use a galvanized pipe with a hose on the end to go under side walk. Good Luck
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