"New" machine. What now? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Interior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-20-2012, 01:56 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NH
Posts: 33
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
"New" machine. What now?

Hi All,

Been lurking here a bit, researching machines sutiable for making canvas tops for old Land Rovers. Found lots of info--Thanks everyone!

While researching machines, I somehow got the subtle impression that DanTwoLakes is a bit partial to the Adler brand so I perked up a bit when I came across a Craigslist ad titled "ADLER SEWING MACHINE" with absolutely no detais and a couple of blurry pics.

Skipping ahead...usually I try to haggle on ALL private sales of ANYTHING, but this time I just gave the guy his $300 asking price and burned rubber out of there with an Adler 167-373T triple transport machine and table in the back of my old Rover.

Here she is:



Anyhow, my question (finally) is--Where can I find general information on thread and needles? For example, which kind of thread is strong and very UV-stable?, which needle is used for which thread size?, what system is used in thread sizing?, etc... In other words, is there a place I can go to learn everything there is to know about thread and needles?

Thanks,

--Mark

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-20-2012, 03:52 PM
DanTwoLakes's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Contact adhesive
Last journal entry: 49 Packard
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin
Age: 64
Posts: 5,856
Wiki Edits: 22

Thanks: 0
Thanked 150 Times in 137 Posts
You really got yourself a steal. Have it gone over by an industrial sewing machine mechanic as soon as you can to have him set thread tensions, time the machine, and check for worn or broken parts. There is no one place to go to learn all about needles and thread. You will have to research needles separately and thread separately. Here is a good web site for needle info: CLICK HERE Here is a good web site for thread info: CLICK HERE


You will find that there are all kinds of different thread sizing charts, and that there is no one universally accepted thread sizing chart. Polyester and Nylon threads are equally strong, but Polyester is more resistant to abrasion, UV rays, and mildew than Nylon is. The rule of thumb for needles and thread is that if the thread will go through the eye of the needle comfortably without binding, the two are compatible.

The needle system your machine uses is 135 X 5. You should be able to find needles from size 16 up to size 24 for your machine. The higher the number, the heavier the needle is. I generally stick to two sizes, 18 and 22, and do 99% of my sewing with one or the other. Normal industrial thread sizes start at 69 and go up in thickness increments from 69 to 92 to 138, and then in increments of 69. The next size up from 138 is 207. In other words, size 138 is twice as thick as size 69, and size 207 is three times as thick as size 69. Your machine should be able to run well with thread up to size 138. Size 20 needles and higher should be able to work fine with size 138 thread. Some good brand names for needles are Schmetz, Organ, and Groz-Beckert.
__________________
__________________________________

No one lives forever, the trick is creating something that will.
__________________________________

Last edited by DanTwoLakes; 02-20-2012 at 04:02 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-20-2012, 05:48 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 28
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here is the operator's manual:

http://www.duerkopp-adler.com/export...ic/167/167.pdf

Here is the parts list:

http://www.duerkopp-adler.com/export...67-372-373.pdf

Here is the service manual for the Adler 67, which is very similar to your unit:

http://www.duerkopp-adler.com/export...7/s_067_de.pdf

Here is a catalog of official attachments:

http://www.duerkopp-adler.com/common...67_and_167.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-20-2012, 06:09 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NH
Posts: 33
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Dan--Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. Great info on those sites (and in your reply).

Cleaned up and oiled the machine and found a welt foot (not sure what size yet) along with the regular foot. Now I'm on a mission to find a suitable 1" binding attachment for it.

[EDIT:] Querty--Thanks for the Adler links--I didn't think of looking for accessorys on the Adler site (though I did find the operator and parts manual earlier).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-21-2012, 07:39 AM
DanTwoLakes's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Contact adhesive
Last journal entry: 49 Packard
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin
Age: 64
Posts: 5,856
Wiki Edits: 22

Thanks: 0
Thanked 150 Times in 137 Posts
The size of the welt foot should be engraved on the side of it some place. I will be shocked if it isn't 1/4". The rule of thumb for the correct welt foot size is based on the diameter of the welt cord you are using and adding 3/32" to the diameter of the welt cord. In other words, if you are using 5/32" welt cord and add 3/32" to it you get 8/32" or 1/4". That is the size welt foot you should use. You use the welt foot closest to that dimension. A 1/4" welt foot works with 5/32 and 4/32 welt cord, and those are the most common sizes used.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1289.JPG
Views:	112
Size:	115.1 KB
ID:	63221  
__________________
__________________________________

No one lives forever, the trick is creating something that will.
__________________________________
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-21-2012, 04:27 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NH
Posts: 33
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Yeah--I saw the part number printed on it, I just haven't had a chance to look it up as I spent the day trying to figure out how to slow the machine down to my speed.

Based on other posts I've read on this board, I think it's as slow as it'll go without a servo motor, since the pulley on the clutch motor is already pretty tiny.

I also tried to dull the sensitivity of the treadle by moving the clutch acutator rod closer to the pivot point on the treadle, though I didn't think to move the other end out as far as it'll go on the clutch arm till just now.

If that doesn't do it for me, I'll probably get a 3 inch bolt and a couple of nuts and drill a hole through the upper part of the treadle and fasten the bolt to the bottom of the treadle so the bolt head will hit the floor and limit the travel of the treadle to a speed I can handle. As I get better, I can always shorten the bolt stickout to give me more speed till I don't need it any more. Sewing machine training wheels, so to speak.

Last edited by SafeAirOne; 02-21-2012 at 04:51 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-21-2012, 10:14 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 28
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Read up on how to adjust a clutch motor near the end of this article .

This made mine a lot less "abrupt" than when I got it and easier to feather the clutch. You can add some length to the motor's bar too.

Putting a nerf football under the treadle also helped make it less touchy, but I eventually bought a Sewquiet 5000 and have been very happy with it.

Last edited by Qwerty27807; 02-21-2012 at 10:21 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2012, 12:41 AM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NH
Posts: 33
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Thanks. Good article. I learned a couple of things about these clutch motors by reading it.

I think I have my major problem worked out--I was messing around with the machine for a few hours earlier, getting used to the jackrabbit sarts when I realized two things: 1, the table has a ton of adjustability built into everything. 2, the treadle must have been set up for somebody that was 5 foot 6 inches tall, and I'm 6 foot 3.

Once I moved the treadle 6 inches forward, I was able to have much more precise control of the treadle (well, my ankles really) and tamed the abruptness, for the most part.

A few more hours of burning through the 5 year old thread that came with the machine and I should be all set.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2012, 07:51 AM
DanTwoLakes's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Contact adhesive
Last journal entry: 49 Packard
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin
Age: 64
Posts: 5,856
Wiki Edits: 22

Thanks: 0
Thanked 150 Times in 137 Posts
On a clutch motor, there is the actuating lever that the rod attaches to the treadle. You can also tighten the wing nut next to the spring at the end of the lever to make it harder to actuate but easier to control. The more you tighten the wing nut, the less the lever can be moved, and the easier it will be to control. Lengthening the rod between the lever and the treadle and making the treadle flatter will also limit how much the lever can be moved.

None of this, however, is a substitute for practicing with the sewing machine and learning how to control it by increasing your skill with the machine.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1290.JPG
Views:	120
Size:	138.0 KB
ID:	63247  
__________________
__________________________________

No one lives forever, the trick is creating something that will.
__________________________________
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2012, 11:10 AM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NH
Posts: 33
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
You can also tighten the wing nut next to the spring at the end of the lever to make it harder to actuate but easier to control.
Oh! THAT'S the clutch machanism wing nut they referred to in another thread on machine controlability. Thanks again, Dan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-10-2012, 11:55 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 3
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
another thing you can do to make sure it is at it's easiest to control is look at the bolt that is sticking out to your right on the pulley end of the machine. it should be just above where the treadle lever is attached. if you unscrew this a few turns it will make the actuation of the machine a bit easier to control, especially if someone adjusted it too tightly to begin.

the best position for this bolt can be tested by pulling back on the treadle and trying to turn the balance wheel. if it can still turn without a problem while pushing your heel down, then it is too loose. tighten it just until you feel the brake begin to work when you push down with your heel.

what this bolt is for is to allow you to tighten it up as your clutch wears down over time. this tip helped me out a lot as the company adjusted my machine wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2012, 03:44 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: NH
Posts: 33
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Epiplayer
another thing you can do to make sure it is at it's easiest to control is look at the bolt that is sticking out to your right on the pulley end of the machine... if you unscrew this a few turns it will make the actuation of the machine a bit easier to control, especially if someone adjusted it too tightly to begin.

Thanks. A few weeks ago my motor started squealing a bit from sitting for a few years, so I took the clutch assembly completely off and lubricated the front bearing on the motor. While I was at it, I lubed the sliding actuator on the clutch mechanism and adjusted the bolt that you were talking about.

Now I have MUCH more control on the starts. The clutch actuator was dragging from lack of sufficient lubrication and was "popping" along instead of smoothly easing into the friction material.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Interior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Strange thing happening with my clear "solvent pop"/"fish eyes" ? myfamiliacc Body - Exterior 35 02-16-2013 07:18 PM
wiki pages: "How to rebuild an engine", "Window removal/installation" Jon Hotrodders' Lounge 0 07-11-2006 12:44 PM
Astro "G" Machine. astroracer Hotrodders' Lounge 3 12-11-2003 03:27 PM
70 AMC Rebel " The Machine" gbovaird Body - Exterior 1 02-07-2003 04:01 AM
Hey croz look """"IMPORTS SUCK""" 78 monte Hotrodders' Lounge 14 08-30-2002 01:13 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.