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Old 02-06-2014, 02:06 PM
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New Shop Advice

Planning out a new shop and wanted to ask for any advice from the experts out there. I am looking for help on door placement, lift placement, cooling & heating...anything I need to know. I live in east Texas so heating is not as big of concern as cooling. Anyway, below are the major specs on what I have planned. Any advise / experience would be greatly appreciated.

  • 30x40x14 building
  • two 10x10 doors
  • one 3x7 walk in
  • 2 post asymmetrical lift

Thanks!!

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Old 02-06-2014, 07:22 PM
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Great! I'm really happy for you being able to build a shop! I have been building my shop for the last 10 years. The best thing I did was to build a small bump out on the back of my shop for my vacuum systme and my compressor. It really cuts down on the noise in the shop. I installed switches inside to turn the vac and the compressor on and off so I don't have to go outside to turn them on and off.

I don't know how much ceiling height you have but I installed a jack shaft opener on my garage doors that increases the amount of head room over the lift.

Good luck with your shop, nothing like having a nice warm place to work in winter!
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Old 02-07-2014, 07:25 AM
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Thanks for the information 38! I thought about doing that, but do not want anything outside in the elements. I plan to use a dual cylinder compressor to cut down on the noise and give better air supply. Also, I am using roll up doors so I will have no overhead openers etc.

Keep the ideas / advice coming.

Thanks Again!
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Old 02-07-2014, 08:37 AM
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The bump out is just a small room, 6ft X 4ft with a large door to the outside. It is fully insulated and sheet rocked. I didn't want to take up any wall/counter space with a door to this room since it is used so infrequently.
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Old 02-07-2014, 08:46 AM
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Got it. Sounds like you did it right and I would do the same. Something for me to think about. Thanks again!
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Old 02-07-2014, 08:58 AM
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This is a picture of my shop ( not very good ).

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Old 02-07-2014, 12:01 PM
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Hope I don't get in trouble for this. Here's the place that has all the answers to your ????

http://garagejournal.com/
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Old 02-07-2014, 01:46 PM
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lift access

I built a 40 X 120 , 16 ft sides , My son is an electrical contractor and installed a 200 amp main and 100 amp sub panel and plenty of 220 V dedicated circuits. Industrial rated light fixtures, One thing I should have done was ran floor tubing for radiant heating, our winters get cold. The BIG mistake was putting the lift back 50 ft. It didn't take long for my son's or my projects to get in the way, cutting off access to the lift. I had pieces to build an overhead crane but the engineer said the steel trusses weren't rated for more load. we got a couple free RV trailer frames and set them on posts for overhead storage.
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Old 02-07-2014, 10:19 PM
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Still in the designing stages of my new shop, looking at around 30 feet deep and 40 feet wide, basically 4 bays, and 16 foot high sidewalls. The first bay will contain an office/sales room and "man cave" with restroom- just 2 man-doors here, one front facing, one on side, second bay will have a 10x10 foot overhead door front and man door to the rear, third bay will have a 10x12 door and 4 post hoist, fourth door will have a 10x14 door for deliveries and accessibility for larger vehicles, or large projects. The office/man cave in bay 1 will have 2 levels the "upstairs" for storage and my woodworking shop, with a 4x4 lift system for storage or project transfers.
I hadn't really thought of where or how the heating system will be placed but radiant floor heating is NOT a bad idea. Siding will be insulated, even where the "clear" panels every other panel are going to be placed to aid in lighting, also thinking of clear panels for the roof too, utilize ALL the free light I can.
An overhead crane system in at least 2 bays is something I am learning at work, is indispensable, plus all the different types of things we use on our cranes to move steel from raw-off-the-truck, to blasted and painted pieces back out the door. Our shop at work is 4 bays but 275 feet long with doors at both ends of 3 of the bays and 2 overhead cranes in each of those 3 bays, with 1 overhead crane in bay 1, and jib cranes located in quite a few locations in bay 2 over the work stations.
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Old 02-08-2014, 01:38 AM
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Use stakes and strings to make an imaginary garage

I have built two garages. One of the best ideas I came up with before you start construction, is to get some stakes and string and string off the perimeter of the garage, the doors, work bench, lift, everything. Drive your car or cars into the imaginary garage and start checking for convenience, enough room, work bench placement, outlet placement and anything else you might want. I did this over several days, and every day I would find something else to change. After a week I had my perfect garage, and you avoid the I wish I had done that different syndrome after the garage is already constructed.

A few things I realized doing this are:

1. Put 120, 220, and air outlets close to at least one of the front doors so you can work on your really nasty projects outside.

2. Go with at least a 9 foot door, 10 foot would be better. Measure your vehicles to be sure you have enough room to get in and out easily. In my area I found the specialist that sold only garage doors would sell the door, deliver, and install for about the same price as just the door at the big box store. I was amazed.

3. If the garage is detached make sure it is far enough away from the house that you can easily maneuver your cars in and out of the garage.

4. Contact the manufacturer of the lift you plan to use for the proper ceiling height and concrete depth. They usually state minimums, but if you have not started construction yet, you can do better than the minimums.

5. Contact the manufacturer of the compressor and welder you plan to use and then wire the garage according to their requirements.

6. If you are going to weld or spray paint I would plan a ventilation system into the garage as well. Even if you don't plan on this I would have some type of ventilation to make it more comfortable in the summer. You may want to plan a large vent fan or two in the wall. Easy to do now hard to do after construction.

7. As far as heat and air I built an opening near the peak of the roof and installed one of those combination heat and air window units. Works great. You will need to plan your wiring for this also.

8. When I was planning the size of the garage I had originally planned on 30 feet wide. By just adding 8 more feet I could have a 3 car instead of a two car garage and still had room for the mower and yard tools on one side.

9. Plan on plenty of outlets and lighting. Custom build the height of the work bench for your height.

10. If this is a detached garage plan on putting a security system in there. In my area every 4 or 5 years the thieves would target the detached garages because there was less chance of getting caught.

Hope this gives you some ideas.
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Old 02-08-2014, 09:38 AM
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more ship info

I put in 4 used 12 X 12 commercial doors so I could get the Backhoe inside to do maintenance. We ran PVC conduit on the ground with extra runs, I was there when the crew poured the floors to watch for damage and had to glue one section back together, But I missed the 120 ft run to the back end. I had under floor conduit to the lift for 220 and 110 outlets, to the 4 X 4 southworth lift table, and under floor piping to the wood working area for electrical, compressed air and the sawdust collector vacuum system. I put in 2 shower drains with sloped floors under the lift , but the sloped floor was a mistake. the transmission jack wants to roll when I want it to stay put. Floor drains are ok but the floor should be almost flat and use a floor squeege. My son ran conduit on the ceiling for electrical cord drops but I have never installed them, and we still end up with too many cords on the floor. The wood working are needs more lights and I will hang some lights at 8 ft when I start building the cabinets for our in progress smaller retirement home.
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:27 PM
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Wish I did this...... Champ Floor Anchor Pot - 1600

Looking back I would have been better off doing a stick built. Pole buildings can be a bugger to insulate.

I build a sliding door to section off part of my shop so I could heat it.
Cool in your case. Maybe add a mini split in your mostly used work area.
I went with a electric furnace which is fine but wish I saved a while longer and got the mini split. Might still?
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Old 02-10-2014, 04:58 PM
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New shop

Having built a few shops over the years, one of the handiest ideas I've found is to put a chain with hook under the floor to use as a pull fixture. Length of log chain, steel bar though the last eye, frame the opening with a 6" pvc pipe end, pour the floor with the chain inside the pvc, use a pvc threaded cap to cover the hole. When you need a place to pull from, remove the chain, hook your cable or chain to the hook and pull away. Actually, I usually put two or three in the floor. Very inexpensive and very useful.
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Old 02-10-2014, 07:02 PM
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I have a 24x34 (3-car) which was the absolute maximum allowed by the bylaws here.
(30x34 would have been much better.)

I have 2 10' tall x 12' doors which gives you plenty of room to manuever.
I had "Mo-Clamp" chain pots installed in the concrete floors in one of the bays. The concrete pad extends 6" up from the floor in order to facilitate floor washing without wicking moisture up the wall.

I'm using a Calcana Infra-red natural gas fired heater along with 2 ceiling fans which keeps it toasty warm, even in our climate. It stays at a very comfortable room temp all summer as well as it's quite well insulated.

I used 1/2" plywood rather than gyprock on the walls because it can take a beating, and you can fasten pretty much anything, anywhere.


I have 110V receptacles spaced every 3 ft around the perimeter as well as 2, 220V for compressor and welder. I made the mistake of only specifying 15 amp wiring for the 110V ... should have been 12ga / 20 amp.

Pics in my journal
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Old 02-10-2014, 08:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 55for65 View Post
Having built a few shops over the years, one of the handiest ideas I've found is to put a chain with hook under the floor to use as a pull fixture. Length of log chain, steel bar though the last eye, frame the opening with a 6" pvc pipe end, pour the floor with the chain inside the pvc, use a pvc threaded cap to cover the hole. When you need a place to pull from, remove the chain, hook your cable or chain to the hook and pull away. Actually, I usually put two or three in the floor. Very inexpensive and very useful.
A friend placed an 8' long 8" wide I-beam in the floor of his shop. The top of the beam same level as the floor. Before installing he drilled and tapped a series of 1/2" NC holes in the top flange then welded cups (2" capped pipe, 2" long) under each hole. Now he can thread eye bolts into the holes or even weld fixtures to the top of the beam. Cut and grind smooth when done.
I thought this was a pretty cool addition to his shop.
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