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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-16-2010 08:26 PM
Cape Cod Bob I just want to say that this site is the best ! The guys on here helping each other out is fantastic. A lot more rods will make it to completion because of the help we all get.
Thanks to all who have helped me.
12-16-2010 05:38 PM
MARTINSR Here are the specs for your donor trucks frame.

Brian
12-10-2010 10:50 AM
aosborn The factory alignment specs for many (most) rwd vehicles will allow for positive camber. I would get away from the factory settings and adjust yours with .5 degree negative camber. That will reduce some of the understeer that running positive camber will induce, and will generally decrease front tire edge wear. Depending on tire width (the wider the tire, the less toe-in typically) I would dial in about 1/8" toe-in. As to caster, start with about 3 degrees positive and adjust from there for how the truck feels going down the road. If the truck doesn't track well on the freeway with these settings, add more positive caster and maybe just a bit more toe-in.

I suspect the reason you have different readings from stock is due to the truck now sitting at a different ride height than when the original body was installed. Could be worn control arm bushings also, or both.

Andy
12-10-2010 08:47 AM
sparkydog
Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
What did you do put your old cab on the late frame? Brian
Yes that is what I did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
That is one of the reasons you would do a frame swap is things like this, no thinking, just align it to the original specs.
Yes

Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
That all being said, properly measuring these alignment points like camber can be pretty tough like you did it, I would say bring it to someone with a real alignmenet equipment if you want to get it right.
I don't recall saying I was going to perform my own alignment. Only that I had done a preliminary check. I would like to learn about the donor truck chassis that I am riding around on. I had no prior history of the vehicle so it seems like a prudent thing to do. Can I check all these angles to within .1* in my garage? No. But can I discover that my camber and/or toe is way off? Yes.

What I am trying to ask is: does anyone know if the factory GM truck specs do indeed call for positive camber? And, does it look like my truck is running negative on purpose or is it simply a sign of wear or improper adjustment? And, what numbers do the board members think is a BETTER set of numbers if the factory ones aren't optimum?
12-10-2010 08:06 AM
THERACER martinsr, u got that right !!!
12-09-2010 10:32 AM
MARTINSR What did you do put your old cab on the late frame? THEORETICALLY aligning it with the specs of the late frame. That is one of the reasons you would do a frame swap is things like this, no thinking, just align it to the original specs.

That being said, it depends a little on how you are going to drive it. I personally wouldn't have any car I own set up with positive camber, don't see a need in that.

That all being said, properly measuring these alignment points like camber can be pretty tough like you did it, I would say bring it to someone with a real alignmenet equipment if you want to get it right. You could have the caster off and measuring that with home tools is pretty hard. Right now you have no idea what the caster is. When correcting the camber you could be correcting the caster at the same time. OR you could be making the caster further out of spec, without knowing what the caster is you are peeing in the wind.

Brian
12-09-2010 09:23 AM
sparkydog
Camber and Toe Settings

Now that my project truck (see photo) is running reliably I am moving into some new areas of inspection/repair. Last night I did a quick DIY check of the camber and toe. I used the floor leveling/linoleum tiles/strings method.

If I did it right, then what I found was:
.7* NEGATIVE camber (top of wheel leaning IN), .3* toe IN.

And what I think the factory specs are is:
.25* POSITIVE camber, .1* toe IN.

Do I have the right values for factory specs (1996 C1500 XCab)?
Is there any reason to set it up different than factory?

Thanks!

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