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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-13-2012 03:33 PM
farna Externally the blocks for the 1956-61 250, 63-66 287, and 1957-66 327 are identical. Cranks and rods interchange. The only difference between the three is the bore in 1/4" increments -- 250 has 3.50" bore, 287 3.75", and 327 4.00". All other parts interchange -- I don't think the 327 even uses bigger valves than the 250. The only difference other than the bore is that the 250 used a solid lifter cam and adjustable rocker arms (and even those will interchange with the other motors, and the 250 can have hydraulic lifters and rockers installed).

If he can find that casting number (should be on one side, have 7 digits and start with a "31" -- there are two 327 numbers that start with a "4" though, and one of those may only have six digits) I sure would like to see it! It may be a 327 casting number.

I just want to reiterate (for other readers) that only the EARLY 287 blocks are supposedly thick cylinder wall 327 blocks (which would have been cast in 1963, March-June, most likely would be in a late 1963 model car, the 287 was introduced in May 1963). The casting number may be the same for all whether the cylinder walls are thick or not. I haven't seen many 287s nor had any checked, I'm going by second hand info from those who have. Most 287 blocks are not thick enough to take a 1/4" bore. If you have a 287 the date code is on the generator/alternator bracket, stamped on a tag that is screwed on. AMC did all their V-8s that way (later ones have the tag on the front of the right valve cover), they didn't stamp a date code on the block. That's the one thing I really hate about the V-8s! So check the cylinder wall thickness before boring.
08-13-2012 02:54 PM
sledge406
bored out

When we looked into it, we found that the blocks are exactly the same size for the 287 and 327. Obviously the pistons were bigger on the 327, but we put flat-top performance pistons in it, and a guy from another town around here bored it out 1/4" and said everything was great. The crank had to be fixed up a little bit, but other than that it went together smooth and everything. We ran it on the stand for about an hour and it sealed up and everything, so we sent it out the door. I'll have to ask the guy if I can get the casting number from it. I don't think he's got it in the car yet. I believe he's waiting until harvest is over before he does that.
08-13-2012 10:48 AM
farna If it took a 1/4" overbore you're lucky! It's been RUMORED that the early 287s were actually cast with real thick cylinder walls, but not substantiated. That's a LOT of extra cast iron when an easy change to the sand cores would allow for a thinner casting. As long as it works you're good, of course! I would just go bore a 287 out to 4.00" (stock 327 bore) without sonic checking the bores to make sure they are indeed that thick. I'm sure your machinist checked it first. Stock 287 bore is 3.75".

I wouldn't mind knowing the casting number on that block. The only casting number I have for a 287 is 3169824. I have 8 different numbers for the 327, only two for 63-66 though. Would be real interesting if the casting number were for the 327. The bore should be cast into the block on top just behind the right head.
08-13-2012 07:52 AM
sledge406
fixed the problem

Actually what we ended up doing was boring out the 287 to a Rambler 327. Turns out that they used the exact same block for both the 287 and the 327, so we decided to go that route instead of a complete swap. We found a 4-Barrel 327 intake, and we had all of the valve covers, pullies, and different parts chromed. It looks pretty damn flashy now.
08-13-2012 07:03 AM
farna I know, an old thread, but what did the guy end up doing -- Ford V-8 or Chevy? Or did he give up on the whole thing?
01-28-2012 11:54 AM
farna 1. There are THREE GENERATIONS of AMC V-8s. More practically there are two very different V-8s. The GEN-1 (most often called a Nash or Rambler V-8, but technically it's an AMC) 250/287/327 was used from 56-66 and shares nothing but bore centers with the later ones. The GEN-2 and GEN-3 are very similar and share most parts. The differences between the two are the heads (better exhaust ports on the 3) and deck height (3 has a 1/16" taller deck, so a different block casting). Parts pretty much interchange, but swapping cranks/rods/pistons get tricky due to deck height -- custom pin height pistons may be required. Externally GEN-2/3 all look the same and fit in the same space, the GEN-1 looks more like a Chevy 396 or Ford Y-block, and weighs as much too. GEN-2 is 66-69 290/343/390 (290 only in late 66 Americans), GEN-3 is 70-91 304/360/401 (and a 1970 only 390, 401 replaced in 71).

2. Value. Hmmm... I'm a Rambler guy, but know the facts! Fact is that a run of the mill Rambler with a Chevy V-8 won't be devalued below the same Rambler with the stock six. Pre 67 models that have the GEN-1 V-8 replaced with a Chevy/Ford/Chrysler probably won't be devalued either. The more popular 67+ cars (Javelin, AMX, all the hard tops) that came from the factory with a V-8 will be worth a bit more with an AMC V-8 AND be much easier to sell. Even saleability won't change much with the pre 67 six cars that have been converted.

3. Sledge406, a Ford swap will be almost a bolt in. For the Ford you just need a bell housing for a T-10. For the Chevy you not only need a bell housing but also the input shaft. Chevy T-10s used a longer input shaft (deeper bell) than Ford and AMC, which used the same length shaft. Since the Rebel had a V-8 you just need to position the motor and drill the mount perches to take the Ford or Chevy mounts. You might need to weld (or bolt) a plate to the Rambler perches to move the mounts, but I don't think so. I know SBC stock mo0tor mounts will work with just a hole drilled, but you need the early sixties truck mounts with a single stud on the bottom. I don't know if anything else used those single stud mounts, but have been told 65-65 trucks used them.
12-31-2011 06:13 PM
RAYFIN An S/C Rambler, now we're talking. I just can't get excited about a car with a stock 6-banger.
12-31-2011 05:56 PM
matt167 287 and the 327's are not like the '67+ 290-401's. They are the old Nash design with a diffrent bellhousing that was only avail with the torque tube.. The '66 Rebel, being top of the line, offered the 4bbl versions..

crossmember swap and the right bell housing and the 290-401 will bolt right up, and parts are widely available
12-31-2011 05:52 PM
matt167
Quote:
Originally Posted by RAYFIN
"I'm reading all these posts about destroying the value of a Rambler" Ummmm...what value would that be?
Depends on the model. Marlin, Rebel machine, S/C Rambler and the early V8 Rouges are all fairly high dollar cars..

That said, a 1966 Rambler Rebel was a 1 year only top of the line, 2dr hard top, 7,500ish produced that year.. 4spd was standard, as well as the bucket seats.. It's not as rare as the big fish ( Marlin ) but it would still be very valuble as an original, and about 1/2 of that with a Chevy.
12-31-2011 05:41 PM
LATECH Thats what I was thinking. The red and blue striped 69 AMC SCrambler.There has to be some available parts for that for a build like the OP is thinking.
12-31-2011 05:23 PM
poncho62 AMC blocks are like SB Chevys.....all the same externally, from 290 to 401....Friend of mine had a 401 in his Gremlin....told everyone it was a 304.

Not sure how one would fit in a 65 American, but they (390) came in the 69 SCRambler
12-31-2011 04:56 PM
LATECH how about an amc 401.Arent all amc v 8 engines an intermediate block like a pontiac? if that is the case and the OP wants an AMC v8 , why not go big? anyone?
12-31-2011 04:44 PM
RAYFIN "I'm reading all these posts about destroying the value of a Rambler" Ummmm...what value would that be?
12-31-2011 02:08 PM
JeffB
Quote:
Originally Posted by sledge406
I'm reading all these posts about destroying the value of a Rambler by putting a Chevy motor in it, but the guy that I'm checking into this for just happens to have a 66 Rambler Rebel with the 287 but the Warner T10 4 Speed. He wants to put a Chevy small block 350 in this car, and he doesn't care about how much it's going to be worth because he isn't going to be selling it. He wants a Chevy motor because it's easier for him, who lives in a small northeast Montana town, to get chrome valve covers and what not for a Chevy motor.

What I'm trying to find is a conversion kit (if they even make one) or a rigged way to get the 350 Chevy to match up to that T10. We're looking for a bellhousing kit w/ clutch, exhaust manifolds or headers, and motor mounts, but we're also thinking that a side-tank radiator, engine pullies, alternator mounting brackets and a different wiring harness may be needed as well. Any help would be very much appreciated!
The Ford swap is easier as I posted previously (read it),heres your bell housing http://www.safepay.net/cgi-bin/shop/...oderndriveline since early Fords came with T-10's the clutch part is a no-brainer,you want some chrome? Here you go too,http://www.skipwhiteperformance.com/...spx?Item=54383 need more info? send me a pm.
12-31-2011 11:38 AM
sledge406
Chevy guy that happens to have a Rambler.

I'm reading all these posts about destroying the value of a Rambler by putting a Chevy motor in it, but the guy that I'm checking into this for just happens to have a 66 Rambler Rebel with the 287 but the Warner T10 4 Speed. He wants to put a Chevy small block 350 in this car, and he doesn't care about how much it's going to be worth because he isn't going to be selling it. He wants a Chevy motor because it's easier for him, who lives in a small northeast Montana town, to get chrome valve covers and what not for a Chevy motor.

What I'm trying to find is a conversion kit (if they even make one) or a rigged way to get the 350 Chevy to match up to that T10. We're looking for a bellhousing kit w/ clutch, exhaust manifolds or headers, and motor mounts, but we're also thinking that a side-tank radiator, engine pullies, alternator mounting brackets and a different wiring harness may be needed as well. Any help would be very much appreciated!
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