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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-13-2013 08:23 PM
496CHEVY3100
Quote:
Originally Posted by 69 widetrack View Post
So true Kelly, good equipment doesn't make a painter, it just helps to make him better. I'll give him a call and let you know what he likes and what he doesn't.

Ray
Very well said,, I will have to stick to my crayons ,LOL
09-13-2013 08:15 PM
69 widetrack So true Kelly, good equipment doesn't make a painter, it just helps to make him better. I'll give him a call and let you know what he likes and what he doesn't.

Ray
09-13-2013 08:07 PM
carolinacustoms That's fine if you want too Ray. Again, no big rush, as I am probably looking at the first of the year or possibly later before I buy one, just doing some homework now. The Iwata was recommended by a guy on the SPI site that does custom work on bikes. I know it is the painter, not the gun, but good equipment never hurts anything either

Kelly
09-13-2013 07:57 PM
69 widetrack Well Kelly, I have no experience with the Iwata airbrush at at all. I have 2 Iwata paint guns that I'm pleased with...LOL...not that how many Iwata guns helps for giving you information information on their airbrush. I do know the rep for the marketing group that sells Iwata locally. I can give him a call and he's a pretty straight shooter...I trust his judgement and I know him well enough that if there any draw backs he would be upfront with me. I can give him a call tomorrow and let you know if you like.

Ray
09-13-2013 07:49 PM
carolinacustoms Thanks for the ideas guys. As for the signature it is not really of any monetary value, more sentimental/promotion. The panel is off of a dirt racing late model that the customer sponsor's. He is wanting to "shine it up a little and protect the signature from any customers that want to rub on it" so he can hang it on the wall of his store. It is just a visual thing to promote the racing and show his sponsorship of the local drivers, so I don't think clearing it (if I can figure out how) would hurt anything. I had thought of asking if the driver would sign it again. If he would I could W&G the current ink and have him sign it with a paint pen .

Kelly

Also, Ray, on the airbrush, I am looking at the Iwata Eclipse series. I have been told they are exceptional and very user friendly. So far I have found several in the $120-$140 range, so they aren't as expensive as I had expected. Any thoughts on those?
09-13-2013 09:18 AM
MARTINSR Of course experimenting is easy though. Give the mid coat clear a try, applying it dry. Build up a few coats allowing it to thoroughly dry before spraying the clear, and again, spraying it a bit dry and with a fast reducer.

Brian
09-13-2013 05:37 AM
69 widetrack
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
Oh the felt tipped pen issue brings a question to mind also. I have a customer with an autographed panel that he wants to put a coat of clear over to protect the signature from fading. It appears to have been signed with a sharpie type marker, and every test panel I have tried with a regular clear seems to make the ink (for lack of better explanation) blurry. It's like it causes the ink to start spreading out or bleed kind of. Anyone know if an intercoat clear would do the same? Reason I ask is I was thinking of trying an intercoat clear to "seal" the ink and then a coat of regular clear for shine and protection. I'm up for ideas to try on a test panel.

Kelly
Kelly, it's unfortunate that the panel was signed with a felt tipped pen, recently I had a similar situation with clearing over a signature of Joe Cooker on a guitar. The signature was signed with a gold pen made for autographs which doesn't distort when cleared...but even in this instance, the guitar came with a notarized letter of authenticity saying that the signature was real. The reason being is that after you have cleared a signature, some collectors feel that it looses it's value because all they can do is one stage of proving the signature is real. Apparently with today's technology many things can be forged and one way of checking is to see if the signature follows past signature patterns. Other things they look at is texture of the signature (high and low pressure points) and that becomes almost impossible if it has been cleared...maybe check that out.

I would think that the inter-coat clear would be even more subject to having the ink blurr or bleed being that inter-coat clear is basically a clear base coat and would have a higher solvent content that regular clear.

The transparent tape method mentioned could be a way to go, if your planning on clearing over top of the tape, just lightly scuff the clear tape before clearing (do a test panel first) just to secure adhesion. I would imagine that like anything else, vinyl's are different and from experience, I know some vinyls don't seem to want clear to stick to it.

But, check with your customer, maybe the sentimental value is more important than the monetary value, if that's the case, it's a great idea to preserve it. If it's a situation where he's also trying to maintain collector value, well, then this is a heads up.

Hope this helps Kelly

Ray
09-13-2013 05:17 AM
69 widetrack I'm starting to think we have too much in common, I've had two Passche's since the mid 80's...LOL. Great airbrushes and still prefer to use them over the Debilbus Dragon I purchased in 09. The Dragon works well but, the airbrush has rubber "O" rings that constantly seem to need replacing and at just under $20.00 a kit, the Passche's seem to be much more durable.

Another thing I've done is acquired my own mini compressor for my airbrushes. This investment allows me to airbrush anywhere. In the past I had run into situation where I wanted to airbrush something and the image I wanted to airbrush wasn't mobile, I would be painting from pictures and with the portable compressor, I could airbrush from a live image, just plug the compressor into any 110 V outlet, it maintains constant pressure and if I'm using in my home, my Wife only complains about a little bit of paint odor...LOL

Ray
09-13-2013 03:46 AM
AirwolfPJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by 69 widetrack View Post
When you decide to get that airbrush, let me know, I'll give a call and we can discuss different methods on how to get started and how to manipulate the airbrush to get different effects. It does take time, the best attributes you can posses to become well versed when using an airbrush are having a knowledge of color and if you can draw or sketch, that comes in real handy as well.

But let me know Kelly, I'd be happy to give you a hand.

Ray
I've had the same two Paasche VL's since the mid-70's. The kits I bought had different needle sizes included. I'm sure there are many other good ones out there - just never had the need to buy any others.
09-13-2013 12:29 AM
69 widetrack
Quote:
Originally Posted by tech69 View Post
we did have a manager but things that he should have picked up on needed to be spelled out for him. You're right, every shop needs a standard and people that are held liable for their work.

I recall when I first started it was me and a couple other pals at a top of the line production shop. When you're a newb there they start you at fast track, just small tear downs and bumper repairs. One guy was really lazy and he was the first to go. The second guy didn't like to get dirty and tested management, he was second to go. The third guy had talent but never accepted criticism, and he was the third to go. To this day, I'm the only guy out of the 4 that still do it. The third guy that had talent but never accepted criticism never moved up past small tear downs and bumper repairs. He's still trying to find a job in the trade but doesn't know much cause he didn't pass those few tests in the beginning, cause it's an investment on the company's part to have a journeyman tutor you.
That's really unfortunate for all involved, the young fellow starting out, the person that's interested in taking someone new under their wing and guide them and the shop itself.

True, it is an investment on the part of the company but, if the process is handled properly, it pays off in spades. Everybody learns, including management and the moral goes up leaps and bounds...I've seen it work so often in many different shops, all successful shops as well.

Ray
09-13-2013 12:23 AM
69 widetrack
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
Ray, I will take any advice you care to offer. I have always wanted to learn how to effectively use an airbrush, but never really invested any time or money into it. I am still doing a lot of reading and research on the subject. I am sure it (like most anything automotive) will take several years to become relatively proficient, so I am in no real hurry. I think based on what I have read, I want a 0.3mm tip. From what I have read it seems to be the most versatile for a beginner. Also I'm still trying to figure out which one to buy, like other paint guns there are millions on the market priced from $20 up to "Holy crap". I would like to stay in the $125ish or less range until I get a little ability anyway. I am mainly looking for something to play with for now and maybe do a little shadowing and that type of stuff to get a feel for things.

Kelly
When you decide to get that airbrush, let me know, I'll give a call and we can discuss different methods on how to get started and how to manipulate the airbrush to get different effects. It does take time, the best attributes you can posses to become well versed when using an airbrush are having a knowledge of color and if you can draw or sketch, that comes in real handy as well.

But let me know Kelly, I'd be happy to give you a hand.

Ray
09-12-2013 11:48 PM
tech69
Quote:
Originally Posted by 69 widetrack View Post
Henry, the old adage of learning more when your is mouth is shut and and your listening, compared to when you open it to defend and or complain is so true...Don't you guys have a one tech that is in charge of quality control, training or mentoring the new guy...that sure would save you the aggravation of having to discuss this unnecessary stuff with your boss. Any shop I worked at that person was in place and it sure saved a lot of grief, the same grief you seem to be going through way to often...If you don't have it, maybe try and get one, if you do have it, the person that's doing it needs more power or autonomy.

It is real frustrating...I understand that.

Ray
we did have a manager but things that he should have picked up on needed to be spelled out for him. You're right, every shop needs a standard and people that are held liable for their work.

I recall when I first started it was me and a couple other pals at a top of the line production shop. When you're a newb there they start you at fast track, just small tear downs and bumper repairs. One guy was really lazy and he was the first to go. The second guy didn't like to get dirty and tested management, he was second to go. The third guy had talent but never accepted criticism, and he was the third to go. To this day, I'm the only guy out of the 4 that still do it. The third guy that had talent but never accepted criticism never moved up past small tear downs and bumper repairs. He's still trying to find a job in the trade but doesn't know much cause he didn't pass those few tests in the beginning, cause it's an investment on the company's part to have a journeyman tutor you.
09-12-2013 11:48 PM
monster76
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
Oh the felt tipped pen issue brings a question to mind also. I have a customer with an autographed panel that he wants to put a coat of clear over to protect the signature from fading. It appears to have been signed with a sharpie type marker, and every test panel I have tried with a regular clear seems to make the ink (for lack of better explanation) blurry. It's like it causes the ink to start spreading out or bleed kind of. Anyone know if an intercoat clear would do the same? Reason I ask is I was thinking of trying an intercoat clear to "seal" the ink and then a coat of regular clear for shine and protection. I'm up for ideas to try on a test panel.

Kelly
maybe you can put clear tape and clear over that never done it but im assuming it worth a try on a test panel
09-12-2013 11:41 PM
carolinacustoms Oh the felt tipped pen issue brings a question to mind also. I have a customer with an autographed panel that he wants to put a coat of clear over to protect the signature from fading. It appears to have been signed with a sharpie type marker, and every test panel I have tried with a regular clear seems to make the ink (for lack of better explanation) blurry. It's like it causes the ink to start spreading out or bleed kind of. Anyone know if an intercoat clear would do the same? Reason I ask is I was thinking of trying an intercoat clear to "seal" the ink and then a coat of regular clear for shine and protection. I'm up for ideas to try on a test panel.

Kelly
09-12-2013 11:34 PM
MARTINSR Felt pen is the most amazing ink ever! My God I don't remember the job particulars but I remember trying to paint over a black felt pin mark once with white SS and it is AMAZING how you can spray that paint over that ink and it comes thru like you had painted it and wrote over the paint! I do believe you could apply 20 coats of paint and it wouldn't cover that damn ink!

Brian
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