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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-08-2010 08:11 PM
LATECH The pull could be related to drum diameter. They have to be within .010 or the side with the larger diameter will pull.
09-18-2006 10:34 AM
EazyDuzIt102 Well I got the replacement with a suspension kit I ordered.This was the only part I didnt replace probably because I couldnt get it off and it was still good at the time I put the new suspension in.So the only way to get the old one of is to torch it?
09-18-2006 05:47 AM
poncho62 Possibly, if it's real loose. If its that loose, you would feel a clunk when turning the steering also. It needs replacing anyways.
Usually, the replacement part has a grease fitting. I would return it and get one that does.
09-17-2006 10:03 PM
EazyDuzIt102
Quote:
Originally Posted by poncho62
It's called the Idler Arm.................an impact gun will usually take that nut off...........You may have to cut it off with a torch. I am not sure of your application, but sometines the centre link gets worn and the tapered hole gets worn and you have to replace that too.

Would this cause the passenger side wheel to shake when I brake if this part is bad?I have a brand new one to replace it with.I just got to get the old one off.It doesnt have a fitting to grease it on the new one but the old one does
09-16-2006 04:50 AM
66ImpSS396
Drum Brakes

One I ran across. Someone had put the brake shoes on so that both long ones were on the driver side and both short ones were on the passenger side. This didn't work so pretty good on a 4 wheel drum brake car. I found it looking for the reasion it pulled under hard breaking.
09-16-2006 02:43 AM
123pugsy Grooves in the backing plate at the 3 "rub" locations will not help smooth braking action. I've welded these up and ground them smooth in the past.
09-16-2006 02:06 AM
KULTULZ
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimfulco

Assuming the hydraulics are all in order, it helps to have the drums turned and then have the shoes arc-ground to match the curvature of the drums. Also, make sure your adjusters (star-wheels) will turn freely and are lightly lubricated.

To adjust, tighten the adjuster until the brakes are just tight enough that you can't turn the drum with two hands. Go push the brake pedal as hard as you can, then make sure you still can't turn the drum. Then back off the adjuster 3 to 6 notches (you'll need to push the self-adjuster arm away from the star-wheel with a thin screwdriver or icepick before it will turn backwards freely) and hit the pedal again. The drum should then turn, but drag just a little. It may take a few more notches, depending on if you have fine or coarse notches, but do all 4 wheels the same.

That's the only way I've ever been able to get drums adjusted evenly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cucumber1949

Regarding the observation of only one side of the wheel cylinder extending when the drums are off:

With the drums off, one side will push out first. This is sometimes misleading because you think that is also what happens with the drums on. With the drums on, the one side will push first, but eventually that shoe will come in contact with the drum, not allowing it to push any further on that side. What happens next is that continued pressure to the wheel cylinder results in a pushing reflex back through the wheel cylinder and begins to push the other shoe toward the drum. When this second shoe contacts the drum, it has a 'servo' action, that is, it gets dragged around a few degrees with the rotating drum and eventually kind of 'wedges' itself into the drum, thereby multiplying the effect somewhat. This is especially true of rear drum brakes.

With the drums off, all the wheel cylinder is doing is pushing out the one side, perhaps until you eject the piston out of the cylinder if the springs are a lot stronger on one side - essentially there is no drum there to limit the travel of the one piston and start the 'extension' of the second shoe.

Older front drum brakes on some cars had two wheel cylinders on the front, thereby allowing both shoes to go into this servo effect, essentially 'biasing' more braking to the front for weight shift, and to prevent the rears from locking up first, possibly causing a control problem.
These two gentlemen have summed it up...
09-15-2006 02:39 PM
matt167 yes there are 2 places that parralellogram steering connects to the frame, at the pitman arm on the steering bod and on the ideler arm. the ideler arm is a " non wear " part if it has no grease fitting or is not a ball and socket, you will need to go to a dealer or a parts restoration company to get a new 1. the parts house's do not carry non wear parts
09-15-2006 02:34 PM
T-bucket23 Proper adjustment of drum brakes is to lock them up and then back them off 5-7 clicks. You ususally will need to make a tool out of a coat hanger or a piece of welding rod to hold the self adjuster out of the way so you can back them off.

If you dont lock them you can never be sure they are centered. An alternative it to take them up until there is reasonable drag, have someone step on the brake pedal a couple time to center the shoes and re-check.
09-15-2006 05:47 AM
poncho62
Quote:
Originally Posted by EazyDuzIt102
.There is an arm that is connected to the frame that bolts to the tie rods.Well it is loose and looks like it is damaged.Not sure what this part is called.This is the only part I didnt replace when I put my new suspension kit in.Now I remember why,I cant get it off.When you turn the nut on the top the bolt spins with it and there is no way to loosen it.How do I get this part off?I have the new one to replace it but I cant get the old one off.
It's called the Idler Arm.................an impact gun will usually take that nut off...........You may have to cut it off with a torch. I am not sure of your application, but sometines the centre link gets worn and the tapered hole gets worn and you have to replace that too.
09-14-2006 10:04 PM
cabowabo
take some pictures of the brakes

i''ll inspect them when i see the pictures have you try to use a measuring tape to get it close for adjustment
09-14-2006 10:01 PM
cucumber1949 Regarding the observation of only one side of the wheel cylinder extending when the drums are off:

With the drums off, one side will push out first. This is sometimes misleading because you think that is also what happens with the drums on. With the drums on, the one side will push first, but eventually that shoe will come in contact with the drum, not allowing it to push any further on that side. What happens next is that continued pressure to the wheel cylinder results in a pushing reflex back through the wheel cylinder and begins to push the other shoe toward the drum. When this second shoe contacts the drum, it has a 'servo' action, that is, it gets dragged around a few degrees with the rotating drum and eventually kind of 'wedges' itself into the drum, thereby multiplying the effect somewhat. This is especially true of rear drum brakes.

With the drums off, all the wheel cylinder is doing is pushing out the one side, perhaps until you eject the piston out of the cylinder if the springs are a lot stronger on one side - essentially there is no drum there to limit the travel of the one piston and start the 'extension' of the second shoe.

Older front drum brakes on some cars had two wheel cylinders on the front, thereby allowing both shoes to go into this servo effect, essentially 'biasing' more braking to the front for weight shift, and to prevent the rears from locking up first, possibly causing a control problem.
09-14-2006 09:42 PM
EazyDuzIt102 Well I got the brakes adjusted and I think I found the problem with why my wheels are shaking when I press the brakes.There is an arm that is connected to the frame that bolts to the tie rods.Well it is loose and looks like it is damaged.Not sure what this part is called.This is the only part I didnt replace when I put my new suspension kit in.Now I remember why,I cant get it off.When you turn the nut on the top the bolt spins with it and there is no way to loosen it.How do I get this part off?I have the new one to replace it but I cant get the old one off.
09-14-2006 06:44 PM
jimfulco Assuming the hydraulics are all in order, it helps to have the drums turned and then have the shoes arc-ground to match the curvature of the drums. Also, make sure your adjusters (star-wheels) will turn freely and are lightly lubricated.

To adjust, tighten the adjuster until the brakes are just tight enough that you can't turn the drum with two hands. Go push the brake pedal as hard as you can, then make sure you still can't turn the drum. Then back off the adjuster 3 to 6 notches (you'll need to push the self-adjuster arm away from the star-wheel with a thin screwdriver or icepick before it will turn backwards freely) and hit the pedal again. The drum should then turn, but drag just a little. It may take a few more notches, depending on if you have fine or coarse notches, but do all 4 wheels the same.

That's the only way I've ever been able to get drums adjusted evenly.
09-14-2006 06:08 PM
matt167 the primary shoe is the shorter of the 2, as they said. some times, tho not common they are the same length by eyeballing them, you have to measure to realize there actully diffrent. putting the shoes on backwards would go togther but it would nearly eliminate the self energiaztion.
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