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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-03-2007 07:55 PM
bluesman123 Its been 18 months since I last posted in this thread, and I'll tell you what! Having a "significant" air compressor has truly changed my life! Just having a supply that is constant no matter what tool I am running has been worth all the issues with setting it up. Cap, you are right, that the cost of the compressor is just the start; but I don't mind. Now the $$ is spent, the lines are plumbed, I have a decent dryer........

Oh yeah...well, the Nova project? Well.....maybe it will be done soon.

Dave
12-03-2007 06:58 PM
Henry Highrise For the flexible conection from the compressor to the hard line...I always use double stainless braid hydraulic line....the stainless braid protects the rubber inner line and you know if it will withstand 3000psi of hot hydraulic fluid it can handle 150 psi of hot air.
12-03-2007 06:47 PM
carguy68
Compressor piping

I have set up the air lines in a couple of factories and have a couple of hints. Pitch the horizontal lines that run around the walls back to the compressor. This way the water can be drained from the tank daily. The tap off for the vertical lines should not be tee'd directly down from the horizontal line but should go up about 3- 4 inches and then down. This way any water in the lines will not go into the drop lines. The bottom of the drop lines should have a shut off valve then (going downward) a tee with the air line couplers and then an additional piece of pipe at least six inches long with a drain value at the bottom. The upper valve lets you shut off that drop. The last piece of pipe collects the condensed water and any debris in the lines and the drain valve lets it out.
03-11-2006 08:56 AM
kringold
Quote:
Originally Posted by robs ss
Maybe you had a dad or brother or good friend that taught you how to do things, or maybe you learned it all by yourself, as for me I am self taught, and these forums are teaching me something every day.
Me too. And personally I think sometimes it's the best way. Too bad we can't get a diploma for it!

As for what I use, an air hose from the compressor in the shed to the shop workbench with a water trap at the bench.
03-11-2006 06:59 AM
Kevin45
Quote:
I think you guys are making a bigger problem of this than it deserves. Any good quality 250psi rubber hose rated for water or air service will work. After all, that is all that is used for your air hoses that feed your air tools. Don't need any fancy ends, just cut the hose to length with a utility knife and slip it on properly sized barbed hose fittings w/ hose clamps. Shouldn't cost more than a few bucks and will last a lifetime
I'm with Willys on this. All you need is a short piece of airhose with the proper fittings on the end. That's all I use and have used and it works just fine.

Kevin
03-11-2006 05:31 AM
oldred I suppose one could argue that the air would be a lot hotter that near the compressor and thus the need for something a little more exotic than standard air hose and clamps and I imagine it would look a bit more professional but as Willys said an air hose should work just fine.
03-10-2006 11:46 PM
robs ss Willys 36

You're probably right, but theres a lot of different people on here that like to know the different ways to do things.

I know I overdo things, and it comes from a lack of confidence, probably my two older brothers, I'm trying to work around it.

I'm 64 years old, and I want to learn everything about these cars and how to fix them the.

Maybe you had a dad or brother or good friend that taught you how to do things, or maybe you learned it all by yourself, as for me I am self taught, and these forums are teaching me something every day.

The good part about this thread is all the different ways to run air lines, then a guy can just sort out how he wants to go.

If you could put some pictures on here, we could see how you do it.

Rob

http://webpages.charter.net/2manitowoc

http://www.2manitowoc.com/paintroom.html
03-10-2006 10:53 PM
willys36@aol.com I think you guys are making a bigger problem of this than it deserves. Any good quality 250psi rubber hose rated for water or air service will work. After all, that is all that is used for your air hoses that feed your air tools. Don't need any fancy ends, just cut the hose to length with a utility knife and slip it on properly sized barbed hose fittings w/ hose clamps. Shouldn't cost more than a few bucks and will last a lifetime.
03-06-2006 03:44 PM
oldred It might be easier to just put a TEE inverted in the lowest point of the dip and then add a "drop", a section of pipe about a foot or so long with a drain valve at the bottom. This will provide a place for the water to collect and be drained without being in the air flow, just be sure and drain it each time you drain the air lines.
03-06-2006 02:19 PM
bluesman123 Man I am so glad I saw this post! I just ran a soft copper line from the comp through the shop the where the soft line starts, with a drier/filter just before the reel. Because this was an afterthought I have a big dip in the copper to get around some cabinets. Would it be better to add a drain valve to the dip or re-run the copper through the ceiling to get over the cabinet?

Dave
02-28-2006 04:09 PM
oldred Probably the most important factor in running the main line, with the exception of material they are made of, is to not have any low spots ANYWHERE in the line unless it has a collection drain. If there is any low spot (such as a dip in the line) where water collecting on the pipe walls will drain down and collect in the pipe it self you will have a big problem. Nothing will happen at first but as the water collects it will begin to restrict the air flow at which point the air will pick it up and cause it to be expelled in surges, not just droplets but some times in large amounts depending on the size of the low spot. When this occurs it will last for only a few seconds and then everything will seem normal with no more problems until the water collects to the critical point and then the cycle will start all over again. I have seen this happen several times and it can be a real headache since most of the time it will overwhelm the separator and simply spray water at the worst possible times.
02-27-2006 11:31 PM
robs ss Heres some more, I'm copying and pasteing from my old posts, so bare with me, I'm not that good with a computer, I guess you're still reading or have you heard enough, anyway.

One more thing here, you will or should have filters at the end of your hard piping, just before it goes into the rubber air hose.

I would drain them every day, heres why.

The last compressor was three years old, I go to drain the filters, and after I turned the little wing nut, I noticed my fingertips felt slippery, so I shut them off, turn the air pressure back up, get a clean white rag, crack that wing nut open and blow it into the rag, it's a little dark colored, and I put it up to my nose, and I could smell the oil.

I run three sharpe f-88 filters right in a line, I took the filters out, the little white do jobs, the first one is dark brown, second a little brown, and the third was close to white.

I have one more f-88 in the paint roon, that one is pure white, so by draining these every day I saved loading my air lines up with oil.

I changed out the compressor, also look at your instruction manual and see if it mentions a duty cycle on your compressor, if it does, I would adhere to it, ask me how I know this.

I run a large bead blaster, a pressurized and siphon sand blaster, I have fought water problems, until I almost bought an air dryer, I went with about 75 feet of 3/4'' black pipe, my water problems went away without buying an air dryer.

You allready know, by listening to you, that it takes some planning to lay all this stuff out.

Hope some of this helps you or somebody out.

Rob
02-27-2006 11:05 PM
robs ss Chris, heres a little more

When you run your line from whatever pipe you use, try and slope it down from your hard pipe, try to eliminate any flat areas in any of your lines, if you look at the line on my site, you'll see how I came off the top of the hard pipe and sloped it down to the filters.

It's the website on the previous post

http://webpages.charter.net/2manitowoc

Rob
02-27-2006 10:52 PM
robs ss Heres some I just posted on another site

Heres a little more on air lines.

TP tools and equipment is one of the largest companies that I know of in regards to sandblasters etc.

If you go to there web site they have a short article on air lines.

It's under

tips/technical

airline hookups


Minimize moisture in your air lines with metal piping

They mention black pipe, galvanized pipe, plastic pipe and copper pipe, not saying that there the last word on this subject, but running air lines, is a big job, and most of us can't afford elaborate air dryers and all that, but a little research before you put them in, will be well worth the few minutes it takes to check it out.

Condensation in air lines can cause a lot of problems down the road, and paint and primer are not cheap.

Anytime an amateur like myself can eliminate any type of problem with the equipment, then that makes less room for error later.


Were in our garages alone, when were painting we can't just holler at a coworker and say something is wrong with the way this paint is going on, in a large body shop you can probably get answers right away, we have to shut down and get on the computer.

Putting in air lines that will keep the moisture down is not an easy task, but if put in right at the start, it's definitely a time and money saver.


http://www.2manitowoc.com/paintroom.html

Just an old mans two cents.

Rob


__________________
02-27-2006 02:21 PM
bowtiedude69
Flex line

I used plastic line that is used on truck air brake application it is rated at 300 psi uses npt fittings and compression sleeves make sure you get for airline. You can get this stuff at most NAPA or Carquest stores. As far as heat I have used the same line for 14 years. The fittings are more expensive but reusable and they make 3/4" and 7/8". This stuff last for many years on trucks a compressor hookup will be easy.
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