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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-19-2012 11:56 PM
68NovaSS Why don't you PM the OP?
04-19-2012 08:30 PM
crussell85 Was the issue with the Impala ever resolved? I just read this book of a thread and was left hanging at the end
03-04-2009 09:01 PM
DoubleVision Pizza dude. By any chance, did you use standard fel pro intake gaskets?
The standard fel pro`s on a aluminum intake don`t work real well as they won`t crush and seal due to the lack of the intakes weight.
The standard gaskets are for cast iron intakes as there weight and bolt tightness will "crush" the gasket and create the seal. So, remove the carb and look into the intake plenum. If you see oil everywhere you have a intake gasket leak. If not then the problem is elsewhere. Give us more detail on how your engine uses oil and if you see any clouds of smoke and the color of it coming from the exhaust as well as the type of oil you used. Unless the PCV system is set up uncorrectly you can`t point the finger at it and blame it for excessive oil use. Give us the answers I`ve asked and I`ll tell you in total how the PCV system works and how it has to be restricted to work correctly.
03-04-2009 08:54 PM
sexypizzaman Luis, I have followed this entire post as well and just read through the 13 pages of it in 3 HOURS!! I am having the EXACT same problem on my build and have made a few posts of my own recently. I know you haven't replied for a while now but I would love for you to fill us all in on the status of your engine and if you found the culprit for the burning oil. I am in the exact same situation you were with my build and I would really appreciate hearing from you to find out what the reason was in your case.

Hope you still visit this site and see this!!

Keith
10-15-2008 10:52 PM
alittle1 Luis,

Were you able to come up with a solution to your problem. Can you bring us up to speed?
10-04-2008 10:24 PM
alittle1 Luis,

What's happening with your Impala?
10-01-2008 01:15 PM
alittle1 Luis,

As I suggested, buy a permanent type furnace filter at Home Depot it is the type that has the synthetic weave (blue or brown, whichever) , cut out a small rectangle of it and remove the baffle, put it inside the baffle and put the screws back in. This will allow vapor to pass but limit liquid and reduce some vacuum.

The filter will cut with a good set of shears and is about one inch thick, this was good for my use.

To shift the transmission, start in low and run it up and change gears manually.
10-01-2008 12:56 PM
Sin7
Quote:
Originally Posted by carsavvycook
I agree that is a lot of oil for such a short run. It is also hard to tell, from your pictures, if the valve covers are short, or tall. By installing a set of tall valve covers, you move the PCV valve up, and farther away, from the oil splash coming off of the rockers.
valve covers are short I suppose. Close to what the stock covers are...

Could I add some material in the baffle to block some of the oil?
10-01-2008 12:54 PM
Sin7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisco
That is a LOT of oil for such a short run time and not even a high RPM run.

Since you have added the baffle plate that Edelbrock sent you there should not be that much oil getting to the PCV valve.

Is the oil draining back down from the heads? Are the drain holes in the head restricted? How much oil pressure do you have at cruise RPM? Are you running a high volume/high pressure oil pump?
My oil pressure stays at 50 psi during idle. And bounces from 40-60 depending on throttle at cruising speeds.

Oil pump is stock if i'm not mistaken. Only thing on the bottom end that I did was notch a small section of the windage tray in the oil pan to clear the oil pump pick up... Could this be causing the excessive oil to the heads?
10-01-2008 12:28 PM
carsavvycook I agree that is a lot of oil for such a short run. It is also hard to tell, from your pictures, if the valve covers are short, or tall. By installing a set of tall valve covers, you move the PCV valve up, and farther away, from the oil splash coming off of the rockers.
10-01-2008 10:02 AM
Frisco That is a LOT of oil for such a short run time and not even a high RPM run.

Since you have added the baffle plate that Edelbrock sent you there should not be that much oil getting to the PCV valve.

Is the oil draining back down from the heads? Are the drain holes in the head restricted? How much oil pressure do you have at cruise RPM? Are you running a high volume/high pressure oil pump?
09-30-2008 07:24 PM
Sin7 Would this be a good time to pull the header off and check to see how the exhaust valve is doing? or should I do the same 1 hour run time process for a few more days ?
09-30-2008 07:21 PM
Sin7
Quote:
Originally Posted by alittle1
Luis,

3. Do not connect your pcv hose but plug it off either at the base of carb or at the valve cover.

If you re-read my email, I said to pull off and plug the pcv hose and run the engine. The reason being, to take the pcv out of the problem. The run test was only for the guide and seal. We want to isolate it to its simplest form and then add one component at a time.

If oil was present, I would have suggested removing the vacuum line from the transmission modulator valve. The reason being was you can not determine what type of oil is being drawn through the engine and burnt.

At this point, we would have these facts:

A. If the test had shown that oil wasn't present in the valve port and exhaust, then I would have said to hook up the pcv line. In doing so, I would have made the suggestion that you put a piece of furnace filter (synthetic weave) in the baffle box on the valve cover to reduce some of the direct vacuum pull into the base of the carb.

B. If oil was present, it would have to be the guide and seal in that cylinder.

Where do you want to go from here? Your 10 mile drive means your back to square one, still burning oil.
you're right Ed, i should have ruled out the PCV valve before running it. I got too anxious and didn't pay attention...So I took your advice with a little twist. I rigged up a $20 DIY oil catch can using home depot items...




I would have just plugged the PCV and ran it like that but then I would have never know exactly how much oil is being sucked in, if indeed the PCV is the culprit.

However, I also disconnected the tranny modulator valve from the intake port. You brought up a good point in saying that we dont know what oil is being burned. I have noticed a decrease in tranny fluid but I had thought it was something else. As you guys may or may not know, I am running a hydraulic suspension but haven't upgraded to a telescopic drive shaft. Therefore when I raise or lower the car, the stock shaft tends to push on the rear tranny seal causing a leak. That's why i thought my tranny fluid was low. BUT when you brought up the modulator valve it hit me that that too is vacuumed to the intake manifold. Anyhow, I unplugged it to rule that out as well.

Here are my observations...

Total run time: 1 hr. broken down as follows:

30 min at idle followed by a 30 minute drive.

It made it a little difficult to bring the driving speed up because the tranny would not shift out of 1st gear. I'm assuming that has to do with the vacuum line being disconnected from the modulator.

After the hour past, this is how much oil had accumulated in the catch can...



NOTE: The car smoked during this time. I'm guessing all the gunk has not burned off yet.
09-30-2008 04:59 AM
seven up
Quote:
Originally Posted by seven up
well

looking at the spark plug, it's kinda clean so it's probably coming from other than the intake runners.

i mean if you were trying to ignite an oily mix the plugs would tell you about it. And this stuff is pouring out the pipe, looks unburnt on your finger.

what's the color code/brand for that engine paint ? if you don't mind...it's the same color as my chris craft 327's.

take it easy with the carb spray on the rockers, too. if you are using the o-ring valve stem seals, the carb spray could eat them up a little and you'll get oil runnin down the valve stems.

And the compression may very well be low on #2 because the gunk around the exhaust valve is preventing a seal.





I'm leavin now. Good Luck.


Enjoy



Hello Again.

How about stopping by the old guy's shop that built it ? You'll spend your 401k on re-gasketing everything at this rate.


Enjoy
09-30-2008 04:23 AM
Soul_Hunter i've not read every post, but from the ones i have there has been a lot of good info posted on his smoking problem.

with liquid oil dripping out the tail pipe, once the problem is repaired with a good stock motor doing only short trips it can take a few hundred miles for the smoke to clear up. if the exhaust has been behind bad smoker for a long time & the oil in the exhaust is caked up, it can take a couple of thousand miles for it to clear out.
it takes heat to burn the oil out of the exhaust & you can't really make enough with short trips. take it out & drive for at least 50 miles non-stop & see what it looks like.
keep a close eye on the oil pressure & check the oil both before you start & at the end of the 50 miles.


for future reference i'll add that you can do a quick check for the intake gaskets leaking by pulling both the breather & PCV valve from the valve covers & then plugging the holes. start it up, you don't want to rev it, just let it idle, pull the dip stick and cover the dip stick hole with your finger & check for vacuum.
being inexperienced, you can use a vacuum gage hooked to the dip stick tube to check it.
i've seen some motors with no problems pull a little vacuum, IIRC the highest i remember seeing was around 2~3 inches or so. the main thing is if it continues to climb. with one intake port leaking on a motor with all the other seals & gaskets good, you can see the same amount of vacuum in the crankcase that you see from the intake, usually in less than a minute.
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