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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-30-2008 01:13 PM
OneMoreTime one of the things you guys can do is cut some coupons out of the practice parts that you have welded and then put them in the vise and beat on them until they break,,When you can weld pieces that do not break then you are getting there..

Sam
12-30-2008 12:57 PM
Vegaguy If you underneath the door where the spool is the is a settings chart for heat and wire speed for the thickness of metal you are welding. Start out with those settings for whatever your welding. Their settings are pretty close to get you going. Once you get better youll learn to fine tune the settings. Keep your nozzle around 1/4"-3/8" from your work. Once you get the hang of the MM175 youll love it, I know I have no complaints about mine. Also you can rent welding videos from here Http://smartflix.com/store/category/27/Welding I have rented a few and they are pretty good. Also try your local library for welding books. Good Luck!
Dont forget, practice, practice, practice
12-29-2008 07:54 PM
old fords We got the welder out yesterday. We put a small spool of wire in it and it worked great. I played around with it today and I can lay down a smooth bead.
10-25-2008 03:16 PM
OneMoreTime i just took delivery of a new Miller 140 auto-set and it came with a nice CD on setup and trouble shooting. I would reccomend getting that CD from miller as it has a good refresher even if one has been welding for years..

Sam
10-25-2008 12:33 PM
powerrodsmike All of the above suggestions are excellent. I will add one more peice of advice that has helped me throughout the last 32 years since I took my first metalshop class. It was standard practice in class to test your welds.

Weld on scrap steel of similar thickness and joint design to the welds that you are going to be constructing your part out of, then test it to destruction. This is part of the same procedure that will be used for the various AWS welders certifications that a guy must obtain to be employed at any number of fabrication jobs.

Here are some pics of some TIG welds that I made when I had practiced enough to actually start to use. I used the same steel and joint design as I was going to construct my part from, tried a couple of different weave patterns, then put it in my 55 ton shop press to try to break it...

As you can see, the part remained intact, distorting the weld as if it was a single peice of steel. The angle those parts were welded together on was twice what you see there. The round depression is from the press ram.




It took 11 tons to bend and distort that peice of steel like that.

Here is the part I was building..Shockwave crossmember for a 68 Imperial with a 9" ford and 4 bar setup.




You should also make welds on scrap, cut the sample apart at right angles to the weld, then use some of the spot check materials commercially available to check for voids or no penetration at the weld bead to base metal. You can also get friendly with the local machine shop, and have the part magnafluxed.

You can also weld your samples, then put them in a vise, and beat the part apart, or bend the part right at the weld...If the weld breaks, you have not succeeded in welding it.

I hadn't stick welded in years, so when I wanted to use my stick feature on my TIG, I did some sample parts..

Welded one edge in a T joint on 1/4" mild steel.



Start bend.


Point of failure.



As the steel had bent considerably past it's yield point prior to failure just past the weld, I considered this weld a success.

Every new joint design goes through the same process at my shop. Especially if it a production part, several samples of the actual part get tested.


I sleep well at night, I do not worry about my welds at all.

One more thing....practice..practice and more practice.
There is no substitute for seat time.

Later, mikey
10-25-2008 11:24 AM
OHD JC are great also the HS adult education places have programs.

In this area the lead/head welding inspector at US restoration facility teaches a class and brings in real titanium, magnesium, SS and other high end materials to practice on...CHEAP.....
10-17-2008 05:29 PM
Conrad_AZ
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
That's 80 bucks well spent and considering the cost of welding it has to be one of the better bargains! There are simply too many myths and bad habits associated with welding and unfortunately all too often these just get passed back and forth by well intentioned but ill-informed friends who weld but are not pros. A good welding class is the best investment a beginning welder can make because once bad habits are acquired they can be hard to break.
One of the benefits in living in a small rural county with high unemployment amoungst it's younger citizens. Our JC is very focussed upon not only providing the typical academic college courses, but also in providing a well structured VocEd program as well. The VocEd courses are run in conjunction with several of the local high schools which could not by themselves fund the classes.

The welding school produces around 10-15 AWS certified welders a semester. Most of the kids are finding good paying jobs with the oil/gas companies, copper mines and with clean room/hospital piping contractors. In addition to the welding school, they have a great training program for the health care industry as well.

This program is one area where I feel that we are getting a good return on our tax dollars. It is great to see state, county and local governments actually working together to help prepare our kids for the future.
10-17-2008 04:19 PM
old fords I practiced a little more. I was doing good wen the gun jammed for the millionth time. I fixed it and did some more. Then it got where it wouldn't burn good. Then it jammed again and I tried to get it to pull out. Ended up managing to break off both ends, and the door on it hit me in the head so I quit for today. I really didn't want to see a new welder go flying. Hopefully tomorrow will be better
10-17-2008 02:30 PM
Ricoch3T If you can't get a class for some reason, do some small projects. I've been around building cars for years, but always let my dad do the welding. I practiced some when I was younger but as I got older I didn't try as much. I had a small class in HS shop class where we focused on welding which helped me find the "bead". This helped a LOT but a lot of my problem was finding the right setting and cleaning the metal a little more before welding. (if it would strike an arc I'd burn the mess off)

Its funny b/c when I started building my car you can see where I've consistently gotten better in both welding and cutting. When I started my cuts were usually off and I would have to fill in some (on thin sheetmetal) with the mig welder. as I neared the end of the metal work you could see which parts were done later in the build than which parts were done earlier in the build.
So basically practice makes perfect especially if you can't get into a class.

Quote:
Originally Posted by grouch
I can vouch for the strange attraction between shoes and molten globs of steel -- it taught me real quick not to wear those cheap, tops-vented-by-woven-plastic sneakers while welding. That cherry red steel ball will zip right through and the melted plastic makes it stick when it gets to your foot. Wear all-leather footgear!



You mean even if I drink 2 gallons of buttermilk and put slivers of potatoes under my eyelids I still can't weld an army tank to an aluminum bridge using galvanized roofing nails for rods without a helmet? How about if I sit on a hot stove while doing the above? (Sorry, oldred, I couldn't resist).

Speaking of bad habits, and remembering the "more is better" syndrome that's somewhere in the Welding Coach thread cboy linked, a new weldor should avoid substituting a build-up of weld for good fitting and good prep. Right after buying a 110V flux core wire welder, I attempted to weld up an exhaust system with it. I took the car to a local shop for a front-end alignment and the mechanic there, a friend, ran it up on the lift to check the underside. His first comment on seeing the exhaust system was, "You must have some monster mud daubers at your house."

I've since given away the wire welder and now have a true mig, based on advice received here. That plus an auto-darkening helmet and that Welding Coach thread made a big difference for me. No more monster mud daubers.
10-16-2008 04:16 PM
oldred
Quote:
Originally Posted by old fords
I got were I could lay down a pretty good bead. I where slip on cowboy boots everywhere. My dad used to cut apart railroad cars ad he would only wear slip on boots. he wanted them so they would be easy to remove if something went in there


While being able to get out them fast may seem like a good idea slip on boots are IMO a real no-no, now before I get clobbered here the key is "IMO". The reason I say this and the reason I quit wearing slip-ons years ago is that while they may come off quickly they are by design FAR more likely to catch a stray piece of hot material in the first place! The design of a slip-on boot necessitates that they have a much larger top opening for the hot material to fall into unlike a good lace-up which fits much tighter around your leg. Your pant legs should cover the tops of boots anyway but this is not always the case depending on what you may be doing at the time but the material can get in even if the boot is covered. In fact most cases of foot accidents I have seen (and experianced! ) the material entered higher up on the pants, sometimes well above the knee. In the nearly 40 years I have been doing this I have seen this happen many times and slip-on boots have made up by far most of the incidents. When I ran my shop I had strict safety rules which included welding quality clothing and steel toe boots but although I strongly recommended good lace-up boots I felt it better to let the employee decide since there can be some argument both ways. It all boils down to this-You can shed a slip-on faster but you are MUCH more likely to get hot material in a slip-on than in a properly worn lace-up and if you do you will still get burned before you can get the thing off. It should be the user's choice but I would not wear slip-ons to weld with, IMO it's far better to keep the hot material out than to be able to quickly shed a boot that caught material it should not have caught in the first place!
10-16-2008 03:09 PM
old fords I got were I could lay down a pretty good bead. I where slip on cowboy boots everywhere. My dad used to cut apart railroad cars ad he would only wear slip on boots. he wanted them so they would be easy to remove if something went in there
10-15-2008 06:56 PM
grouch
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulerow
remember those little balls of melted steel rolling off the table always get in your shoe, so wear bluejeans and boots, gloves and a leather welding jacket, and if you can afford it a auto-dark helmet
I can vouch for the strange attraction between shoes and molten globs of steel -- it taught me real quick not to wear those cheap, tops-vented-by-woven-plastic sneakers while welding. That cherry red steel ball will zip right through and the melted plastic makes it stick when it gets to your foot. Wear all-leather footgear!


Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
There are simply too many myths and bad habits associated with welding and unfortunately all too often these just get passed back and forth by well intentioned but ill-informed friends who weld but are not pros.
You mean even if I drink 2 gallons of buttermilk and put slivers of potatoes under my eyelids I still can't weld an army tank to an aluminum bridge using galvanized roofing nails for rods without a helmet? How about if I sit on a hot stove while doing the above? (Sorry, oldred, I couldn't resist).

Speaking of bad habits, and remembering the "more is better" syndrome that's somewhere in the Welding Coach thread cboy linked, a new weldor should avoid substituting a build-up of weld for good fitting and good prep. Right after buying a 110V flux core wire welder, I attempted to weld up an exhaust system with it. I took the car to a local shop for a front-end alignment and the mechanic there, a friend, ran it up on the lift to check the underside. His first comment on seeing the exhaust system was, "You must have some monster mud daubers at your house."

I've since given away the wire welder and now have a true mig, based on advice received here. That plus an auto-darkening helmet and that Welding Coach thread made a big difference for me. No more monster mud daubers.
10-15-2008 05:29 PM
oldred
Quote:
Originally Posted by Conrad_AZ
for welding classes. I hadnt done any welding for 15 years so when I got back into building cars, I signed up for a MIG class at our JC. I convienced five members from our car club to sign up as well. As I recall it was about $80 for a semester and they provided the equipment, gas, wire and steel.
The instructor was top notch - demonstrated proper technique and was on hand to observe and critique your work.
In addition to getting back in the groove so to speak, we had a great boys night out every week!
Just read Dewey's post on a Welding Coach. Totally agree with his comments as well. I recently had a good friend and excellent welder/fabricator drop by my shop. He showed me some really great techniques for MIG welding thin gauge material and preventing warping the material while getting good penetration.


That's 80 bucks well spent and considering the cost of welding it has to be one of the better bargains! There are simply too many myths and bad habits associated with welding and unfortunately all too often these just get passed back and forth by well intentioned but ill-informed friends who weld but are not pros. A good welding class is the best investment a beginning welder can make because once bad habits are acquired they can be hard to break.
10-15-2008 02:35 PM
old fords I'd like to take a welding class but they are only offered in the morning and I have school. There are no afternoon classes offered at the community college
10-15-2008 09:29 AM
Conrad_AZ
Check your local Junior College...

for welding classes. I hadnt done any welding for 15 years so when I got back into building cars, I signed up for a MIG class at our JC. I convienced five members from our car club to sign up as well. As I recall it was about $80 for a semester and they provided the equipment, gas, wire and steel.
The instructor was top notch - demonstrated proper technique and was on hand to observe and critique your work.
In addition to getting back in the groove so to speak, we had a great boys night out every week!
Just read Dewey's post on a Welding Coach. Totally agree with his comments as well. I recently had a good friend and excellent welder/fabricator drop by my shop. He showed me some really great techniques for MIG welding thin gauge material and preventing warping the material while getting good penetration.
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