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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-14-2009 05:38 AM
Old Fool I suggest replacing the tank. You said the compressor works well, you have a new motor, why not just take the hit and spend $400 for a new tank?

http://www.aircomparts-air-compressors.com/i2025/
01-09-2009 06:35 PM
DougMN Could you take out a pipe fitting and insert a bore scope into the tank and look for rust pitting?
01-06-2009 07:17 AM
roger1 The room I built for my compressor has the interior walls insulated and the door is a metal exterior door. It's pretty darn quiet in the main room when it is running.
01-05-2009 11:33 PM
Rambo_The_Dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevelleSS_LS6
When I get a place of my own someday, if I don't have a large shop, I'd like to pour a slab and build an 'exterior room' of sorts (it would look like an outhouse stuck to a pole barn) for the compressor. Even quieter, and you have more shop space.

My real dad has his big ol compressor in an elevated room above some shelves in his pole barn.
I hear ya - no pun inteneded!

I would rather go outside with it and free the space, better noise levels etc.

But then...

I started thinking about framing and pouring a pad.
Buying all the shed supplies
Building the shed
Insulating and painting the shed
Buying more wiring and conduit
Buying more copper, air lines etc
Moving the freaking thing by myself!

It was too much money/time right now for what little space/quiet I'd gain.

Maybe my next shop....
01-05-2009 10:28 PM
ChevelleSS_LS6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo_The_Dog
... I opted to build the compressor a little room instead. It was way cheaper!

Now it's MUCH quieter working in the shop, not as nice as your shop though (shop envy)


When I get a place of my own someday, if I don't have a large shop, I'd like to pour a slab and build an 'exterior room' of sorts (it would look like an outhouse stuck to a pole barn) for the compressor. Even quieter, and you have more shop space.

My real dad has his big ol compressor in an elevated room above some shelves in his pole barn.
01-05-2009 01:41 PM
DaSouthWon Honesty is the best policy, however, theres some guy that won't really care and buy it anyways cause its a good compressor for cheap. Be up front, that leaves you with a clear mind, and when something happens you don't have to worry about if your quick cash cost the buyer an appendage. Just suggest that they get the tank tested, and that it's more than likely fine, but just like you check the brakes on your car, preventive maintnance goes a long way.
01-01-2009 08:58 PM
Rambo_The_Dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
Well,

I inadvertently left the web browser open with this thread up and my wife started reading it. She said to me "What's this about old compressors blowing up?"

If I get a new one, I'll probably be looking at either a Quincy or an Ingersoll Rand. At the minimum, I would try to match the performance of what I have now (18 scfm @ 100 psi and 16 scfm at 175 psi). I will want to stay with a single phase 220 Volt 30 Amp feed.

I think I could sell my old compressor by advertising in the local paper. I bet I could get $400 to $500 for it. Would this be an unethical thing to do? (That is, selling my problem to someone else.) Or, is it buyer beware as long as I am upfront about it's age? The compressor looks good, works perfectly and has a new motor and belts.
Leaving the browser open - that's a nice trick, other married folks might benefit from this insight

As far as selling your current setup, let me ask you this...If your motor hadn't burned I'm sure you would have just continued using yours without a thought, correct?

That's because you know you took as good of care of it as you could and it's always served you well.

So if you're honest with someone that you are selling the old setup now because you're not comfortable with it age - I don't feel that would be unethical.

I bought my "Barn Find" Devilbiss Pro 4000 on Craigslist used 2 years ago - it was approx 13 years old then. It was used in a private home shop and never ran commercially.

I don't even know if Devilbiss still makes compressors but for a 5hp 80 gal it has pretty good specs (check the inset on the bottom of the picture)

When I went to look at it the first thing I did was open the drain - the water that was there was clean, without rust. So given the history and maintenance I have been very comfortable about the tank holding up.

Since I moved in I always planned to move the compressor outside but, given the cost and the current housing market I opted to build the compressor a little room instead. It was way cheaper!

Now it's MUCH quieter working in the shop, not as nice as your shop though (shop envy)

01-01-2009 08:28 PM
grouch
Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
Grouch,

The only thing I see negative is that a "cheap" compressor is usually rated at 135 psi. Mine is 175.
That's why you keep your compressor. Is that a limitation of the tank or the compressor? Maybe the certification plate would tell. I'll see if I can find something on my tank about its limit, since it was part of just such a system.
01-01-2009 07:41 PM
roger1 Grouch,

The only thing I see negative is that a "cheap" compressor is usually rated at 135 psi. Mine is 175.
01-01-2009 07:35 PM
grouch
Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
Well,

I inadvertently left the web browser open with this thread up and my wife started reading it. She said to me "What's this about old compressors blowing up?"
I hope you pointed out that it's the tank that could explode, under the right circumstances, not the compressor.


Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
I think I could sell my old compressor by advertising in the local paper. I bet I could get $400 to $500 for it. Would this be an unethical thing to do? (That is, selling my problem to someone else.) Or, is it buyer beware as long as I am upfront about it's age? The compressor looks good, works perfectly and has a new motor and belts.
IMO, it would be wrong if you tried to conceal the reason for selling it. If I were going that route, I'd probably advertise the motor, compressor and the parts that go with them at the price you stated, then offer to give the buyer the tank with the warning about its age and possible hazard.

It still looks to me like you could keep that new motor, old compressor, and buy a cheapy new compressor + ASME tank and have a real good system for about half the price of a whole new one:
($350 new motor + ~$350 new tank w/dinky compressor)
versus
(($1400 to $2000) - ($400 to $500 back from old system, if sold)). Ok, I'll shut up now. It ain't my decision to make.
01-01-2009 10:49 AM
oldred
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-bucket23
I have a friend who does failure testing for a living. He said under normal conditions those tanks will not explode, they will just fail. They actually did some tesing for Ingersol rand and every tank they tested, eventually failed at a weld and not were catastropic explosions. A rusted tank will just gently blow out usually.
I would not be concerned about it.


As I have already said they usually just spring a leak but the problem here is the word usually. The unfortunate fact is they can and do explode sometimes and the example Grouch provided the link to is a good example, also I have personally examined the results of two catastrophic explosions both of which caused heavy property damage and one one caused a disabling personal injury (the one involving the truck), both were caused by internal corrosion. Over the last 30 years or so I have seen several accident reports involving tank explosions at mine and construction sites and almost all of then was due to internal corrosion although a few of them were the result of physical damage or attempts at repair.
01-01-2009 10:42 AM
oldred Grouch, that's a good find on that tank explosion thanks for providing the link. Also in that same thread they have have a pretty good warning about the dangers of using PVC for air line plumbing.

Roger, if I may make a suggestion on the new compressor if you decide to go that route IMO the Quincy is the best choice and they have finally decided to get competitive with their pricing. Northern tool has some Quincy models now with free shipping, here are a couple of them but they have more.

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...0475_200350475

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...0476_200350476


Quincy compressors have always been my favorite and they are made in the USA!
01-01-2009 09:53 AM
T-bucket23 I have a friend who does failure testing for a living. He said under normal conditions those tanks will not explode, they will just fail. They actually did some tesing for Ingersol rand and every tank they tested, eventually failed at a weld and not were catastropic explosions. A rusted tank will just gently blow out usually.
I would not be concerned about it.
01-01-2009 06:57 AM
roger1 Well,

I inadvertently left the web browser open with this thread up and my wife started reading it. She said to me "What's this about old compressors blowing up?"

If I get a new one, I'll probably be looking at either a Quincy or an Ingersoll Rand. At the minimum, I would try to match the performance of what I have now (18 scfm @ 100 psi and 16 scfm at 175 psi). I will want to stay with a single phase 220 Volt 30 Amp feed.

I think I could sell my old compressor by advertising in the local paper. I bet I could get $400 to $500 for it. Would this be an unethical thing to do? (That is, selling my problem to someone else.) Or, is it buyer beware as long as I am upfront about it's age? The compressor looks good, works perfectly and has a new motor and belts.
12-31-2008 10:11 PM
grouch
Quote:
Originally Posted by roger1
I get your point. But, I am looking at probably $2,000 to match the performance numbers of my compressor in a new one.
I'd be reluctant to give up on that compressor. Of the 3 main parts of the system, it's probably the only one that makes economic sense to rebuild when necessary. You already have a new motor. The tank and compressor have been working well, IIUC, with the only doubt being that the tank could be at the end of its service life.

First search I did turned up a "3 HP" compressor with a 60 gallon vertical tank for $327. That's less than a typical tank by itself and can probably be beaten by more searching. Maybe there's a shop near you that would test your current tank for less? Even if there isn't, the price of the new motor plus that tank is less than half your estimate for an equivalent but all-new system.



Just in case anyone still believes tanks don't explode...
http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...ad.php?t=69953
This thread has more than 15 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

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