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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-11-2009 04:34 PM
PapaG It is not new, the building is at least 5 years old. My Harley really doesn't leak, it marks it spot. It is a shovelhead...
02-10-2009 05:37 AM
scrimshaw
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Kemp
Scrimshaw, as we get older we do become very adapt at certain things, whether we want to admit it or not it is inevitable and I do consider you to be an expert. But I can't for the life of me think of anything that I was an expert on when I was 18 years old. So I'm almost afraid to ask what it was that you were an expert on when you were 18 years old, but I got's ta know man!
Dinger said it. At 18 I was an expert at everything. Today - it seems like the longer I live - the less I know.

Nothing like sailing to reduce you from an expert to a moron. The sea will prove you wrong every day.
02-10-2009 12:33 AM
dinger
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Kemp
Scrimshaw, as we get older we do become very adapt at certain things, whether we want to admit it or not it is inevitable and I do consider you to be an expert. But I can't for the life of me think of anything that I was an expert on when I was 18 years old. So I'm almost afraid to ask what it was that you were an expert on when you were 18 years old, but I got's ta know man!
Scrimshaw was probably like the rest of us at 18 yrs old, an expert at ....Everything. Just ask my Mom.
02-09-2009 06:06 PM
Chris Kemp
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrimshaw
I haven't been the expert on anything since I was 18 - the longer I live the more it seems there is to learn, even about things I have been doing for 20 years.

I would agree with Flynbrian - if it is pressure-treated plywood there is not much you can do with it until it dries out, and being it is inside that could take many months depending on climate inside the building. Here is some info on painting and staining after it dries.
http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/infpre.html
Scrimshaw, as we get older we do become very adapt at certain things, whether we want to admit it or not it is inevitable and I do consider you to be an expert. But I can't for the life of me think of anything that I was an expert on when I was 18 years old. So I'm almost afraid to ask what it was that you were an expert on when you were 18 years old, but I got's ta know man!
02-09-2009 05:59 PM
Chris Kemp Now wait a minute why we picking on Harleys? I have a 2002 softail and she has never leaked not even a seep. (twin cam is a very well designed engine) But now my 1990 Evo she seeps a little but she has never left a drop except for the one time when I put to much oil in her while doing an oil change but she did that on the driveway. And besides a little bit of oil could be a good thing. It would help to preserve the wood. Old sailors used to swab the deck with pitch and that is a from of oil. LOL
02-08-2009 11:24 PM
OneMoreTime Watch for some of the heavy aluminum baking pans from commercial restaurants..those are sturdy and work great under the Harley and for holding parts and such..

Sam
02-07-2009 11:00 AM
schnitz Great link!

In a while, Chet.
02-07-2009 09:09 AM
scrimshaw
Quote:
Originally Posted by schnitz
Actually, better idea would be to send the pm to scrimshaw have him answer this publicly so we all can learn. It'll be interesting to see his thoughts, no doubt.


In a while, Chet.
I haven't been the expert on anything since I was 18 - the longer I live the more it seems there is to learn, even about things I have been doing for 20 years.

I would agree with Flynbrian - if it is pressure-treated plywood there is not much you can do with it until it dries out, and being it is inside that could take many months depending on climate inside the building. Here is some info on painting and staining after it dries.
http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/infpre.html
02-07-2009 08:50 AM
schnitz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Kemp
I would definitely go with some sort of epoxy but what brand I'm not sure. Shoot scrimshaw a private message because he the expert on epoxy paint for wood, fiber glass and such and he should be able to tell you which brand is the best for the buck.

Actually, better idea would be to send the pm to scrimshaw have him answer this publicly so we all can learn. It'll be interesting to see his thoughts, no doubt.


In a while, Chet.
02-06-2009 02:45 PM
flynbrian48 I'd leave it alone. Treated has SO much moisture in it, it will be very hard to have any surface finish stay. You can powerwash it every so often to clean and bring back that, to my eye, kinda good looking yellow/green appearance. Just don't hold the wand still in one spot
02-06-2009 02:42 PM
PapaG It has a treated plywood floor. All the floor joists are treated as are he runners.
02-06-2009 02:24 PM
flynbrian48 Why not treated plywood? It's slippery wet, but so's an epoxy floor, and it can be wet (from ground moisture) and not delaminate. Wouldn't cost any more either, by the time you're done.

Brian
02-06-2009 02:19 PM
Chris Kemp I would definitely go with some sort of epoxy but what brand I'm not sure. Shoot scrimshaw a private message because he the expert on epoxy paint for wood, fiber glass and such and he should be able to tell you which brand is the best for the buck.
02-06-2009 12:14 PM
PapaG
Epoxy Floor treatment on wood?

Does this work? I am moving a big portable type building and I am thinking about putting a epoxy floor treatment on it. It will be a plywood type floor.

I could use a porch and deck paint on it instead. I will be doing wood work and some engine work in it. I don't want a slick floor but something that will not absorb oil.

The Harley marks it's spot too.

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