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Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior> Should I do the bodywork and paint my own car or pay this guy to do it?
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-29-2009 07:42 AM
83SILVRADO see what you can do with it. i wouldnt trust some illegal immigrant. i can definitly relate to havin no money. but see what you can do with a mallet and a block of wood. thats what i had to do to get all the dents outta my truck. it worked ok... but im not goin to any car shows so i could care less...
04-29-2009 07:39 AM
Irelands child If you can't afford to do it correctly, you will always be chasing your mistakes. With that said, consider an epoxy primer paint job until you can, 1, either do it correctly or 2, can afford to pay a pro to do it. Prep for epoxy primer does take some effort, but the stuff can be color tinted, some like SPI can be used as a sandable primer, it's good protection coverage for bare metal and it has a suede like finish that will hide other sins. Just don't use a regular lacquer base or 2K primer as rust will just appear at the first rain storm.
04-29-2009 07:25 AM
Conrad_AZ
Another Possible Way to Go...

I see that you live in Austin. If Austin has anything it has schools, I know I lived there and have paid a whole bunch of property taxes to support the school system I always thought the got the spelling of Texas (Taxes) wrong.

I believe the community college system offers an autobody tech degree. Find out who is running the program and go talk with them. Most schools are always looking for 'project' cars for the students to work with. Wont be the best job when done, but it will probably be better than what you can do on your own with a limited budget.

Take it from an old fart, you need to focus upon your education and career, keep it simple while in school!
04-29-2009 05:21 AM
barnym17 Another way to get supplies cheap is to hit up local body shops and paint suppliers many times they will have mismixed paint that didn't come out the exact color they needed or some one ordered and didn't pick up they will sell ya on the cheap or even give away to avoid disposal fees.
04-28-2009 07:38 PM
oldguy829
Do it yourself

I think you are on the right track, do what you can as you can. One more suggestion, Don't just slap bondo and paint on it. Do one thing, do it the best you can, and seal it (notice I didn't say primer it, primer has no sealing capacity to speak of.) You may only have one good fender, but "You have ONE GOOD fender" As you work your way around the car, you'll keep getting better, and you may reblock that first job. But if you did it right, that's all you'll have to do. Not rip it out and start over.
We all appreciate budget builds. If you have done a nice job on one fender, that's what we will see. We ignore the rest cause it isn't done yet.
04-28-2009 02:26 PM
cyclopsblown34 Each time you redo the car, you'll get that much better at bodywork and the car will get much better. You'll just use a bunch of time redoing it. Good luck man.
04-28-2009 01:34 PM
jagarcia05 right well with my budet of 350 maybe 450.00 i dont think i can do all i'd like to do.

i may end up having to hammer out what i can and only patch the really bad holes. then cover everything up with some bondo and paint it. at least it'll be better than it was until i can get some more cash and do it again.
04-27-2009 03:06 PM
oldguy829
paint and body work

You can do this yourself. I did our 28 with no prior experience. Now for the reality....
My skills as a welder were awful. Ended up getting my son to do the actual welding. I cut out the rust, made the new panels, screwed them in place using an overlapping piece in the back. Once he welded the seams, we removed the screws and welded the holes up. many hours for me, not a big deal for him.
Same deal with the body work. Some of it I had to redo 2 or 3 times to get it right. Final solution was to spray it all with Slick Sand, a kind of liquid polyester, that can be feather sanded nicely. Then I shot it with primer, base and clear. Looked like ****. Runs, orange peel, bugs, you name it. This was in an enclosed garage with a filter and exhaust fan. To top it off, I found lots of minor flaws I didn't find when it was in primer. Started over and block sanded the entire car and fixed every flaw. Found a pro who agreed to come and just "shoot it" on the weekend. He showed me how to properly seal the garage, how to balance the incoming to outgoing air flow, told me never to shoot at night, bugs will find a way in to the light, and laid down a nice job with his pro gun, not my cheapie. Paid him $200 for about 5 hours work. I did the buffing and polishing. I had a dedicated stall for this painting, 60 gallon air tank, da sander, air file, both a paint and primer gun.
The total job took 9 months of nights and weekends. I spent over $1000 on materials and supplies. (double dose of base and clear) Paint, hardener, thinner, primer, catalyst, various grit paper, tape, solvents, degreasers, etc. The car was in the shop the whole time. Perhaps you have more natural talent than I do, or maybe you're looking for a 30 foot paint job. But if you want a paint job you can be proud of - $350 in your driveway aint going to get it. You would be better off doing the rust repair in sections, as you can, and shooting it all in primer. It would look better than rusty, and many flaws just don't show. My .02
edit - that sounded harsh, didn't mean to. You can do this. But it is an art, it takes patience and practice. My next job will go faster and I'm betting I can do it all next time. It is a skill worth learning if you intend to do it more than once. Just have realistic expectations. If you'll be happy with "better than it is now" go for it.
04-27-2009 02:34 PM
McLeay F1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fast Eddie D
Yes, yes, and yes.

You can do corrosion free no weld metal patching with sheet metal from Menards, Home Depot, etc, and auto body adhesive. The adhesive really does a great job of preventing corrosion at the seams.

I do decent metal work with less than $150 in tools. I made my own metal brake. I have a $20 set of hammers and dollies; I got my $20 out of them 6 years ago and they still work great. I bend and crown metal with my workbench, angle iron and cheap clamps. I make bucks out of plywood, screws and glue. I use my imagination and I come up with low and no buck solutions for everything that comes my way. It's not rocket science. A caveman could do it.

that's the way I like to hear it!
04-27-2009 02:26 PM
jagarcia05 k i just found out that my tax return is gonna be around 350.00

thats what i have to work with at the moment. could i get the job done with that much cash?

also i've been trying to upload my pictures from phone of the car and its damaged spots on to this thread but i can't figure out how
04-23-2009 04:34 PM
Fast Eddie D
Quote:
Originally Posted by 60rodder
Good move, THIS IS A DO IT YOURSELF FORUM, ABSOLUTELY! There is plenty of help here, everyone will get you through it without charge.

Start with 60-80 grit sand paper and a block of wood. Remove the necessary trim if you can and sand away to the metal. If you need to trim the rust out, use a tin snips (wear gloves). Home improvement stores or autobody shops have sheet metal. Guess the thickness and ask for help. You can rivet them in place, but the bond will creat an environment to start more rusting later. Weld if you can. The sheet metal can be trimmed and formed with a vise-grip, hammer, any tool you can think of. Give us pictures to help you out. Think ahead about the prep-work. Ask here again before you start. You'll be fine. The jobs always look ugly before its polished.

Yes, yes, and yes.

You can do corrosion free no weld metal patching with sheet metal from Menards, Home Depot, etc, and auto body adhesive. The adhesive really does a great job of preventing corrosion at the seams.

I do decent metal work with less than $150 in tools. I made my own metal brake. I have a $20 set of hammers and dollies; I got my $20 out of them 6 years ago and they still work great. I bend and crown metal with my workbench, angle iron and cheap clamps. I make bucks out of plywood, screws and glue. I use my imagination and I come up with low and no buck solutions for everything that comes my way. It's not rocket science. A caveman could do it.
04-23-2009 01:02 PM
kirkschopped67 I just finished a paint job on my truck. I purchased a video from Autobodydepot.com. This video is by Rich Evans and it is called metal to paint. All your questions will be answered. SLOW down and do your research just like you have learned in college. READ, STUDY and take your time. I am 51 years old, and my project has taking me 6 years.

You are welcome to PM me and I can also talk to you on the phone. I will post some pics

Kirk
04-23-2009 12:52 PM
jagarcia05
Quote:
Originally Posted by 60rodder
Good move, THIS IS A DO IT YOURSELF FORUM, ABSOLUTELY! There is plenty of help here, everyone will get you through it without charge.

Start with 60-80 grit sand paper and a block of wood. Remove the necessary trim if you can and sand away to the metal. If you need to trim the rust out, use a tin snips (wear gloves). Home improvement stores or autobody shops have sheet metal. Guess the thickness and ask for help. You can rivet them in place, but the bond will creat an environment to start more rusting later. Weld if you can. The sheet metal can be trimmed and formed with a vise-grip, hammer, any tool you can think of. Give us pictures to help you out. Think ahead about the prep-work. Ask here again before you start. You'll be fine. The jobs always look ugly before its polished.
i'll post up some pics for you all to see what i'm talking about. maybe you can advise easier that way. just let me get away from the office and i'll snap some shots with my phone and try to paste them in the body of the message i guess.
04-23-2009 12:50 PM
jagarcia05
Quote:
Originally Posted by 69ChevelleAddict
I pick pine up from Home Depot or tractor supply, someplace like that.
They sell it in sheets that are like 1.5'x2' or something like that, it isn't quite the same gauge thickness as the stock stuff but then again repop parts arent either, and being thinner it is a bit easier to work with.
Be sure not to get galvanized stuff if you plan on welding it, that stuff creates poisonous fumes.

Total costs are going to depend a lot of the color you choose, brand and how much material you are going to buy.
I just bought a quart of Omni epoxy primer, sand paper and all the goodies needed to paint up the inside of my quarter panels for about $150 the other day.
Mind you this price was for some supplies that i wont need to buy again for a while like: Sand paper, solvents, mixing cups, sanding blocks, bondo spreaders ect.

And keep this in mind, plastic(bondo) can hide a LOT of ugly body work.
My car is a perfect example, looked ok when I bought it but when I stripped it I couldnt believe how bad the welds were and just the amount of crap work that stuff covered.

I didn't have any experience welding or doing body work before I started tearing into my car, but by practicing and working on the parts of the car that are less noticible first you can get in some practice before tackling the stuff that will be seen.
If you have specific questions this site is a great place to find answers, just ask!
right and i thank you all for the help youve provided. it really is great to have a forum like this.
04-23-2009 12:47 PM
jagarcia05
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich27028
abrian - totally agrre with you --
but

if this guy wants to make his car look better untill then -- bondo the holes do a good sand job on it and shoot a couple coats of paint -- wet sand and buff-- it will last him for 10 years -- or untill he gets out of school and gets a real job--

btw there --whats your major jagarcia
im majoring in nursing
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