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Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Transmission - Rearend> Off-set Pinion Shaft
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-12-2009 07:39 PM
enjenjo Ok
05-12-2009 04:32 PM
red65novawagon yes
05-12-2009 04:31 PM
enjenjo
Quote:
Originally Posted by red65novawagon
We need to clarify some terms. Pinion offset is a fixed location in the differential housing center section, what everyone is talking about here is pinion centerline and yes the u-joints will accommodate a little variation but not much for long. Peace man
Ok, i'll redefine. As long as the Ujoint angles are the same front to rear on a two Ujoint shaft, and the angle in both Ujoints is under 7 degrees, they will function indefinely as designed, quite nicely, with the working angle in any direction, as long as the front and rear working angle is the same, but opposite.
05-12-2009 03:47 PM
red65novawagon We need to clarify some terms. Pinion offset is a fixed location in the differential housing center section, what everyone is talking about here is pinion centerline and yes the u-joints will accommodate a little variation but not much for long. Peace man
05-12-2009 03:14 PM
enjenjo
Quote:
Originally Posted by red65novawagon
Get back to me when you offset it side to side then I'll just tell you I told you so.
I build 5 to 10 cars a year, for the last 40 years. I know what works, what don't work, and why.

Just imagine this, with the pinion centered, and the engine centered, put the whole car on a rotisserie. when you turn the car over, the angle will change from vertical to horizontal, without any relative movement. And it will work just as well at any of the angles in between. The angle doesn't change, just the orentation of the angle changes. It's still one angle.
05-12-2009 01:01 PM
cobalt327 Below is what you do not want.


......../engine
........l
........l }driveshaft
........l
I----<>----I rear end
05-12-2009 12:43 PM
XNTRCI-T enjenjo is correct. As long as the axis of the transmission output shaft and the axis of the pinion are parallel, the u-joints only see one angle no mater what the offset is.
05-12-2009 11:19 AM
red65novawagon Get back to me when you offset it side to side then I'll just tell you I told you so.
05-12-2009 09:49 AM
enjenjo
Quote:
Originally Posted by red65novawagon
I've tried to explain this in the simplest posible way but some thing you just can't get across. The pinion has to be square to the out put shaft of the trans looking at it from above PERIOD. The only other way to explain this is look at the front end of GM 1/2 ton 4 wheel drive trucks, they're using CV style drive axles because U-joint simply can't articulate to accommodate two separate planes of motion. If you still don't believe me do it the other way and you'll be doing it twice! I guarantee it!
It doesn't matter which way the offset is, there is still only one angle. As long as all the major components are parallel, engine, trans, and rear end, in a vertical plane, and within a degree or two of parallel in a horizontal plane, and none of the Ujoint angles are over 7 degrees, it will work fine.
05-12-2009 08:31 AM
red65novawagon I've tried to explain this in the simplest posible way but some thing you just can't get across. The pinion has to be square to the out put shaft of the trans looking at it from above PERIOD. The only other way to explain this is look at the front end of GM 1/2 ton 4 wheel drive trucks, they're using CV style drive axles because U-joint simply can't articulate to accommodate two separate planes of motion. If you still don't believe me do it the other way and you'll be doing it twice! I guarantee it!
05-11-2009 11:42 PM
ericnova72 Enjenjo, you found the explanation I've been struggling to find the words to describe, you nailed it. There hasn't been a rear drive car made since the late 50's that didn't have offset both laterally and vertically.
05-11-2009 11:19 PM
enjenjo If the driveshaft is offset to one side, that would be one angle in a vertical plane. If it's offset up and down that is one angle in a horizintal plane. If it is offset both vertically, and horizontally, it is still one angle, but at 45 degrees to both the vertical, and horizontal, and still measured the same way.
05-11-2009 02:22 PM
red65novawagon Just 4 *****s and grins if you have a way to get your car up in the air pull the driveshaft from the rear and bring the shaft down so that it's at two different angles, when it's at two separate planes of travel and you'll quickly understand what I'm talking about.
05-10-2009 08:57 PM
enjenjo Most rear drive GM cars have the engine offset to the right. And most of them have a centered pinion. the angle is a non issue. up and down, side to side, or at 45 degrees, as long as the angle of the joint is less than 7 degrees, and equal but opposite the angle on the second joint, there is no problem.
05-10-2009 04:16 PM
cobalt327 A u-joint when working at an angle will have fast and slow portions of its rotation, for lack of a better term. The idea is to have these motions in phase w/each other. If there are more than one out of plane angle, it's easy to visualize how there will be problems.

Whether a 'Vette has this "two planes out of phase" is really a moot point. It is not a desirable thing, and I suspect the engineers of the 'Vette did this for reasons that are not usually encountered- and did the things necessary to quell any damaging vibes/oscillations that will result.
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