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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-27-2003 08:44 PM
bear
Running Lines

Although appearance is much better with hidden lines, I think it is wiser to install them on the outside(accessible) of the boxed frame. (for ease of repair/replacement) bear
06-26-2003 08:55 PM
EBlack36 So Cal rod Shop now does a step box on their 32 frames from what I see in the ads. If I understand correctly they started doing this to help protect the lines and also to hide them a little bit. In about another year we are going to built another 36 Pontiac and Plans right now include step boxing the entire frame, although it is plenty strong I am going to have to cut the x-member partway out and will lose some of that strengh. As far as clamps the one from Gordman are very nice, but a lot of times I use what are called adle clamps, these are manufactured for electric wiring and are made out of either stainless or aluminum and have a rubber cushion and are available in a varity of sizes. Not saying it is perfect, but it works for me.
06-25-2003 06:37 PM
fat50 Cool, Just drop me a line when your ready.


C
06-25-2003 12:58 PM
jimmy p
Quote:
Originally posted by fat50
Are you in the Detroit area? Maybe i can hook you up with some "engineering samples". We get way more than we need for testing and such.



Chris
Well im way up north but illl let you know when i get to that point
thanks
Jim
06-23-2003 08:57 PM
fat50 Are you in the Detroit area? Maybe i can hook you up with some "engineering samples". We get way more than we need for testing and such.



Chris
06-23-2003 05:17 PM
jimmy p
Quote:
Originally posted by fat50
How about sinking the plate used to box the frame in about a 1/2", than use an umpco clamps for the lines? Tube clips come in multi line configuration anywhere from singles on up. Here is a 5 line clip we are working on for A/C lines.


C
Yea I was also considering that..isnt that called step boxing? Im pretty sure thats what someone called it before. So where can I get these clips from? I am going to have gas lines, brake lines, 1/2 air line and also a few electrical to run most of the way down the frame.
06-23-2003 01:34 PM
fat50 forgot to attach the picture, doh...
06-23-2003 01:32 PM
fat50 How about sinking the plate used to box the frame in about a 1/2", than use an umpco clamps for the lines? Tube clips come in multi line configuration anywhere from singles on up. Here is a 5 line clip we are working on for A/C lines.


C
06-22-2003 11:41 AM
SirSpeedy We use some mild steel tubing from the steel supplier. it is 1/2" OD, .062" wall.

I don't have a picture, but you you leave a small access hole in the frame rail up under the cowl near the brake pedal area(on both sides of the chassis), and the wiring will exit the frame rail inside of the front crossmemeber....then up into the headlight stands, into the grille shell, or whereever else you need to run wiring.
06-22-2003 09:25 AM
jimmy p
Quote:
Originally posted by SirSpeedy
Not sure what kind of car you are working on, but on our '32 chassis, we install tubing down both sides of the frame, behind the boxing plates. You can use these 'tunnel's to run wire for the headlights, parking lights, electric fan, etc. This way you run the engine harness to the engine and its accessories, then the rest of the chassis wiring is concealed.

As far as brakes and fuel, I like them on the side of the rail. Take care and make them flow smoothly, and carefully tuck them up under brackets, etc. Just make sure it looks trick. I tell the guys in the shop all the time to just imagine that a guy from SR or R&C is standing right over you taking pictures..... "Does the work your doing look trick?"

Good luck.
thanks, what kind of tubing do ya use? Got any pics?
thanks alot
Jim
06-22-2003 09:09 AM
SirSpeedy Not sure what kind of car you are working on, but on our '32 chassis, we install tubing down both sides of the frame, behind the boxing plates. You can use these 'tunnel's to run wire for the headlights, parking lights, electric fan, etc. This way you run the engine harness to the engine and its accessories, then the rest of the chassis wiring is concealed.

As far as brakes and fuel, I like them on the side of the rail. Take care and make them flow smoothly, and carefully tuck them up under brackets, etc. Just make sure it looks trick. I tell the guys in the shop all the time to just imagine that a guy from SR or R&C is standing right over you taking pictures..... "Does the work your doing look trick?"

Good luck.
06-21-2003 10:33 PM
Forkliftguy I would think running them on the outside would be better for the fact that if you ever needed to service any of the lines, you would have much more access to them. Plus, if for some reason, one of the lines were to fail, you would see the leak, as opposed to if they were to be boxed in. HTH



Marc
06-21-2003 10:30 PM
Deuce


I have done this BOTH ways.

For a "show Car" in side the frame is best.

The down side is if the lines develop a leak.........you are out of luck.

I prefer running the lines outside the frame and being able to work on them if I have to. Most Rod Shops sell clamps designed to hold lines to the frame. Ray Godmans in TN sells the kind I like.




06-21-2003 10:21 AM
jimmy p
Running brake, electrical and gas lines with a boxed frame?

I am looking at boxing my frame in and I was wondering what the best way to run my gas lines, electrical, air suspension and brake lines. Would it be a good idea to run some metal tubing inside the frame before I box it? Or should I run all these lines on the outside of the frame?
thanks!

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