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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-03-2009 03:56 AM
deadbodyman Nice work center line.
12-02-2009 08:29 PM
302 Z28 Sorry if it seemed I came on a little strong, it's just that there ere literally dozens of people that frequent this forum that have used the stuff and like me just rave about it. I know the PPG epoxy of today is nothing like the PPG epoxy of say ten years ago, haven't used DuPont so I can't really say. I'm willing to bet however that DuPont epoxy has been watered down also, I do know that DuPont Imron has. If you get the chance to use SPI's epoxy you will see how much better it is than the high priced spreads.

Vince
12-02-2009 07:38 PM
48cad
Quote:
Originally Posted by 302 Z28
Because I tried a test. I had the metal four piece hood of my 34 primed with PPG DPLF epoxy primer. It had been primed for over three months sitting in my garage so you can't say it wasn't cured. After reading a thread in this forum about PPG DPLF wiping right off after cure with a lacquer thinner wet rag I tried it. Sure enough it came right off, I cleaned off all four pieces of my hood with a lacquer thinner soaked rag. I then primed it with SPI epoxy primer and let it cure for a week. Tried the same test as with the PPG epoxy. The SPI primer was unfazed, not even a mark. I challenge anyone who dis-believes this to try it and see. If you have never used SPI epoxy IMHO you have no right to challenge it. Use it and you will be convinced it is the best epoxy primer on the market.

Vince
Relax Man, nobody said that it wasn't any good. I have used Dupont's 2540 after I ditched the PPG DP epoxy's. I really like the Dupont. I recently tried SPI's universal clear for the first time, and was impressed. You just stated that it was the better than PPG and Dupont regardless of cost. I just wanted clarification on why you think that. If you are going to make statements like that, it would be more believable if you had something to back it up, otherwise it just sounds like a commercial for SPI. Again, I am in no way bashing SPI. The only product that I used was their universal clear, I found it to be top notch in spray-ability, clarity, depth, cuts and buffs nice. The only undetermined thing is durability.
12-02-2009 06:56 PM
MARTINSR
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
Looks good centerline, but I think you are confusing epoxy and etching primer again. Etching primer isn't 2 part, okay it has 2 parts, a vinyl? resin/ zinc, and acid, but its not really a 2k product, and you really don't want to paint over it without using another primer first-most tech sheets I've seen give strict warnings against painting directly over them. Maybe you could paint over them or some manufactures say its okay after allowing plenty of time for the acid to leave, but most say its a no no. Etch primer usually has very little build and if you apply them heavy at all will be running all over the place.

Epoxy on the other hand is 2k . It doesn't contain an acid to etch the surface, its more like a glue, so surface should be sanded for adhesion, but much better then an etch primer and less chance of leading to any problems with other products or down the road.
There is no argument here the epoxy is much better. But that particular etch is a pretty good one. I sold HUNDREDS upon HUNDREDS of gallons of it that was painted over. It is in the tech sheets, at least on the "REAL" tech sheet. That particular product is a "value line" but a repackaged top of the line! Marketing, you have to love it!
A few manufacturers bought it by the pallet as a primer for metal and aluminum that was painted over. Another was a truck painter who painted logging and dump trailers that were sandblasted and again, top coated right over it. Sort of a "bestest" way to go instead of the "Best" over epoxy.

Centerline, some cheap medwave infrared lights are hard to beat. I have two of these, I wouldn't go back to a "burger warmer" lightbulb for nothing.

I don't have this exact brand, mine has a tripod base. But honestly, they are super and not a whole lot of money.

Brian

12-02-2009 06:49 PM
Centerline
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
Guess I am wrong, does look like etch. Must admit not familar with nor have used any Martin senour products. Sorry.
And weird, the PDS says can be directly topcoat, not often you see that. I am guessing the 15212 is really an acid/reducer, not an activator?
I'm no expert but as far as I know you can't spray the stuff without using one or the other of the second parts.

Here's a pic of this stuff after I sprayed my firewall with it. Hate the color but it does seem to fill very minor scratches and sands very well.



By the way..... here's the gas tank installed.

12-02-2009 05:56 PM
kenseth17 I never questioned the quality of spi epoxy. Finally got the chance to use it for the first time on the last two relatives vehicles I did. Just was not aware why it said it was an etching primer. I didn't know they still had zinc in epoxys, PPG's use to have zinc back when it was good.
The only problem I had with it was kept getting fisheyes when I reduced to shoot the sealer coat, and could only figure it was something with the epoxy, as didn't have a fisheye problem with anything else and I metacioulously cleaned before and after. Found out from other users it was the white epoxy, and the white can be a bit finicky with application and I should try shooting with a bit higher pressure. That did the trick, but ended up having a long day in the garage because of it. Other epoxys I've used just shot on at pretty low pressure and haven't really experienced that. I like that it has more build then your typical epoxy, dries glossier then the typical epoxy primer, which helps checking out your bodywork, and if kept in warm temps can be sanded dry the next day without balling up the paper-also not typical of other epoxys.
12-02-2009 05:28 PM
302 Z28
Quote:
Originally Posted by 48cad
Other than price and Barry being available on the phone, Why do you say this? Proof? Experience?
Because I tried a test. I had the metal four piece hood of my 34 primed with PPG DPLF epoxy primer. It had been primed for over three months sitting in my garage so you can't say it wasn't cured. After reading a thread in this forum about PPG DPLF wiping right off after cure with a lacquer thinner wet rag I tried it. Sure enough it came right off, I cleaned off all four pieces of my hood with a lacquer thinner soaked rag. I then primed it with SPI epoxy primer and let it cure for a week. Tried the same test as with the PPG epoxy. The SPI primer was unfazed, not even a mark. I challenge anyone who dis-believes this to try it and see. If you have never used SPI epoxy IMHO you have no right to challenge it. Use it and you will be convinced it is the best epoxy primer on the market.

Vince
12-02-2009 05:19 PM
kenseth17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centerline
OK, the technical term is etching filler (I changed my original post to reflect that fact). Its Martin Senour Chromate Free Etching Filler Part # 15211 with 15212 hardener. It's a two part etching filler that Martin Senour recommends for bare metal, fiberglass, galvanized steel, cured body filler, aluminum, OEM enamels, and OEM lacquers. I like everything about it except the ugly green color.
Guess I am wrong, does look like etch. Must admit not familar with nor have used any Martin senour products. Sorry.
And weird, the PDS says can be directly topcoat, not often you see that. I am guessing the 15212 is really an acid/reducer, not an activator?
12-02-2009 04:56 PM
48cad
Quote:
Originally Posted by 302 Z28
Not sure, but it is without a doubt the best epoxy primer on the market, hands down regardless of price. Far superior to anything PPG or DuPont has to offer.

Vince
Other than price and Barry being available on the phone, Why do you say this? Proof? Experience?
12-02-2009 10:16 AM
deadbodyman
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
I've used it. I'm curious, So how, or what in it makes it etch? Is there an acid in it?
Zinc Phosphate...it kinda etches but as with etching primer (phosphric acid),just spraying it on is not etching nearly as well as scrubbing ospho in by hand and then epoxying...I've tried it both ways...
12-02-2009 10:03 AM
302 Z28 Another trick I used when spraying small parts in my garage is to first dust the floor with a little clear to seal the dust to the floor. Yes it waste a little clear, but I figure it's a wash as now I don't have to sand some clear off to get rid of dust nibs.

Vince
12-02-2009 08:40 AM
Centerline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisco
.......How are you keeping the dust down?
Without a booth its always hard to keep dust down.... even in a booth you can get little dust nibs. What I do is blow the immediate area off and let the whole area sit for at least 20 minutes. Then I wipe down the piece with wax and grease remover before I shoot the paint. The trick is to move slowly around the area while you're doing anything so you don' t kick up any dust that might remain. Of course spraying will kick up some but that's why I try to spray as far above the floor as possible. If you notice the gas tank was mounted on a home made mini rotisserie above my welding table a good 4+ feet off the floor and the front edge of the table was covered with masking paper. That way, based on the direction I would be spraying any dust that was kicked up by spraying would (hopefully) move away from the piece.
12-02-2009 07:48 AM
Frisco
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centerline


The results were outstanding when you consider it was not painted in a booth and the conditions weren't optimum.
Looks excellent to me!

Good suggestions for folks like me that are trying to learn painting techniques.

How are you keeping the dust down?
12-02-2009 07:07 AM
302 Z28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
I've used it. I'm curious, So how, or what in it makes it etch? Is there an acid in it?
Not sure, but it is without a doubt the best epoxy primer on the market, hands down regardless of price. Far superior to anything PPG or DuPont has to offer.

Vince
12-01-2009 10:22 PM
NEW INTERIORS Look's very good..
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