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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-05-2012 07:09 PM
abcounts1
thanks

I finally figured this out by looking at a drawing from Heidts IFS. The instructions that came with the Helix universal IFS were terrible. There were not nearly enough details, especially for those of us who have never done an IFS conversion before. It took lots of work just to figure out what was what. I will not use Helix again. Thanks for your input.
02-05-2012 12:08 PM
spellsinger
spindle washer location

The photo of the spindle you show with the ball joint is correct. The washers go on top. The reason that the washer hole is too big, is so they do not contact the ball joint when tightened, but allow the ball to pull up through the spindle so it seats properly on the taper. Hope this helps. tom
01-31-2012 06:05 AM
Larry the wrench
Mustang 2 ball joints and spindle

[IMG]P1240099.JPG[/IMG] I hope you didn't purchase M2 from hoffman Group (Helix Suspension) I got the same problem and have been trying to get a resolution from Hoffman tech service and don't have and answer yet. I will keep you posted if they resolve the problem.
01-24-2012 08:24 AM
abcounts1
Mustang II Diagram needed

My instructions were sketchy on how to install the ball joints to the Mustang II spindles on the suspension kit I bought. There are spacers that I don't know where to put. It looks like they go between the castle nuts and the spindle itself, but they have a big whole and are hard to center under the castle nut. If you put them on the ball joint tapered shaft before the spindle goes on then the spindle will not tighten up properly on the taper. I would like a drawing showing the proper placement of the spindle, ball joint tapered shaft, spacers, etc. Thanks for your help.
12-13-2009 01:43 PM
DENCOUCH
Quote:
Originally Posted by rotten4x4
Dude! ... you are da bomb!!
12-13-2009 10:16 AM
rotten4x4
spindle drawing

see if this will help you

http://www.wilwood.com/Start/PDF/fl193.pdf
08-15-2006 09:33 PM
Kraproon My concern is the propery geometry, and I can design for this and component interference given the dimensions. I would have thought that given the popularity of the Mustang II front end that a drawing would be readily available but perhaps not so.

If you could post/mail your jig to take the measurements this would be a big help to all - thanks

Another listee has indicated a desire for a drawing as well, so I am hoping that he could take the measurements and advise the group. If I end up having to import a pair of spindles to get a drawing I will do the same.

Still hoping that someone has a drawing

Robert
08-15-2006 09:46 AM
johnsongrass1
Quote:
Originally Posted by astroracer
One of several reasons would be geometry. Splicing two arms together can be done but the issue is what is happening to the geometry. A different spindle will definitely alter the geometry to some degree and I think this is what Robert is more concerned with. That would be my concern also, simply replacing one spindle with another does not optimize the inner control arm points to work with the new spindle upper, lower and tie rod ball stud points and this can throw bump steer, camber gain and roll center out the window.

Robert, I have measured quite a few spindles just for this reason when I am designing a suspension around off the shelf parts. I just finished measuring an aftermarket spindle for a project I am working on and it isn't all that complicated. You do have to have the parts though, so it does commit you to buying (or borrowing) them.
I will post some pics of the spindle jigs I built for this project which lets me set the spindle up at ride height (really not necessary, but handy) to measure all of the requisite points to develope a 3D CAD model of the spindle. I usually do this as a very rough model because the points are what is important and as long as the shape is the correct envelope size I can confirm clearances to other components.
Mark
Changing ball joints to a shorter or taller one make roll center easily adjustable. Changes in ride height help too.
08-15-2006 08:12 AM
BillyShope
Quote:
Originally Posted by astroracer
One of several reasons would be geometry.
Yes, that's a given. In the case of the Pinto (aka Mustang) spindle with the Sprite, it appeared that the guys at Ford had the Sprite in mind. Everything fell right into place with the Sprite steering matching up perfectly. As I used a tubular aftermarket upper arm (the shock serves as the stock Sprite upper arm), I was able to place the roll center exactly where I wanted.

I've suggested arm splicing for those cars where dropped spindles are not available and a lower stance is desired. In this case, there could be a significant geometry change, with the roll center usually going lower. This would make the car a bit looser, but that is usually a "plus."
08-15-2006 07:50 AM
astroracer One of several reasons would be geometry. Splicing two arms together can be done but the issue is what is happening to the geometry. A different spindle will definitely alter the geometry to some degree and I think this is what Robert is more concerned with. That would be my concern also, simply replacing one spindle with another does not optimize the inner control arm points to work with the new spindle upper, lower and tie rod ball stud points and this can throw bump steer, camber gain and roll center out the window.

Robert, I have measured quite a few spindles just for this reason when I am designing a suspension around off the shelf parts. I just finished measuring an aftermarket spindle for a project I am working on and it isn't all that complicated. You do have to have the parts though, so it does commit you to buying (or borrowing) them.
I will post some pics of the spindle jigs I built for this project which lets me set the spindle up at ride height (really not necessary, but handy) to measure all of the requisite points to develope a 3D CAD model of the spindle. I usually do this as a very rough model because the points are what is important and as long as the shape is the correct envelope size I can confirm clearances to other components.
Mark
08-15-2006 07:24 AM
johnsongrass1 Now you said in the first post you wanted to use the mustang II spindle. You know the Pinto and the mustang II are the same thing right?

Read this:

http://www.randys-racemart.com/pinspinnew.html





They also have chevelle lowers, nova lowers, metric lowers, and the taper reamer. You choice of ball joints as well.
08-15-2006 04:32 AM
BillyShope
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kraproon
Billy

...for several reasons.
Several???

I just objected to the inference that I was posting suggestions with "safety aspects" problems. While most production control arms are stampings, virtually all aftermarket arms are weldments. These weldment arms are safely used by thousands of rodders around the world. That which I suggested is merely the conversion of a couple of stampings into a strong weldment. With a competent welder, the finished article is stronger than the original stamping.

A primary concern...when I post on any subject...is the safety of those involved. I have a son involved in motorsports and I would never suggest anything that I wouldn't consider safe for my own son.

Now, if you had stated that you didn't care for the appearance of a spliced arm, I would certainly understand. But, if you are including safety questions among your "several," I question your conclusions.
08-14-2006 10:31 PM
Kraproon Billy

I understand that and do not mean to demean your method. It is just that it is an approach that I would not take for several reasons.

In any case I need the spindle itself, so welding to the arm is a moot point.
08-14-2006 09:54 PM
BillyShope
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kraproon
Thanks for the suggestion, but I do not like the safety aspects of welding a spindle or splicing spindle to lower A-arm. I have seen welded spindles fail and would prefer to do it differently. YMMV.
You don't weld the spindle. You weld the arm.
08-14-2006 09:09 PM
Kraproon
Mustang II spindle drawing

The problem is getting the spindle in the first place. I am in Thailand and there are no Pintos.
My design uses a Cortina MK-III - MK-V or Holden (Australian Chev) spindle both from the 70's which are also impossible to get here. My alternative is to redesign for a Japanese spindle, or use the Mustang II.

Since I need to redesign or import what I need, it might be best to use the Mustang II as the aftermarket is full of not only standard and dropped spindles, but big brakes as well.

Thanks for the suggestion, but I do not like the safety aspects of welding a spindle or splicing spindle to lower A-arm. I have seen welded spindles fail and would prefer to do it differently. YMMV.

Here is a drawing of the chassis FYI. Note mid engine, and double A-arm suspension front and rear. Rear hubs are BMW 525, and now I need the front spindle.

Any help in getting a Mustang Ii spindle drawing would be greatly appreciated.
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