Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board - Reply to Topic
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Hotrodding Basics> "Basics of Basics" Control cable repair and restore.
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Thread: "Basics of Basics" Control cable repair and restore. Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
12-29-2011 11:03 AM
matts37chev
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt327
Good info!

There are motorcycle cable lubricators that are used to get lube inside the cable sleeve and not everywhere else.

The idea is to clamp the cable sleeve end w/the ferrule into the rubber sleeve, the inner cable comes out the other end. Tape or whatever can be used to build up the OD of the type cable being worked with.

Then the lube straw tip is inserted into its hole and the lube is injected into the cable sleeve.

Cost <$10. Many bike riders will already have one around the shop.

this is what i use, they work very well

if properly put on the cable, the end is sealed up with the straw on the spray can
allowing the propellants' pressure, from the aerosol can, to force the lube through

they work great with penetrating oil, for freeing a frozen cable
or you can use them with lubricating oil, for maintenance (if they start to get sticky)
12-29-2011 10:46 AM
mocheez
“Basics of Basics” Control cable repair.

Good methods and advice. I think the most important step is to not get in a hurry. Once you get that rust broke loose, try some Break free. I find it works amazingly well. The gun guys use it. I think it meets several Mil-spec requirements, but I'm not sure. Triflow is another good one. These lubes also loosen up "stiff" cables. Worked on my '66 Chevelle heater/AC cables.
09-08-2010 11:22 AM
MARTINSR Yep, this particular one had a set screw that was stripped. The set screw also had it's top split in half so the screw driver wouldn't even work anymore. We are talking a #4 machine screw, pretty small to work with!

Anyway, I carefully screwed the set screw out using a tiny pick. I then drilled the hole out (remember the threads were all messed up) to for a #6 tap. I tapped out the threads and installed a new allen head set screw.

Brian
09-08-2010 11:04 AM
alittle1 Brian,

So, besides the cables, do you repair the knobs too?
09-05-2010 05:00 PM
MARTINSR
Quote:
Originally Posted by dinger
I've had problems loosening cables, and the wire like hinges on the old coupe hoods, I use oil and where possible, turn them with my drill, it works wonders getting the lube worked through. Wouldn't work with the switch, but where you have a flat and or a ball end, it works well.
Hey, that does sound like a super idea! With the emergency cable it would work for sure.

Brian
09-05-2010 02:03 PM
dinger I've had problems loosening cables, and the wire like hinges on the old coupe hoods, I use oil and where possible, turn them with my drill, it works wonders getting the lube worked through. Wouldn't work with the switch, but where you have a flat and or a ball end, it works well.
09-04-2010 06:48 AM
farna Actually, I don't think the switch would be harmed by diesel fuel. Acetone/ATF mix works really good, but the acetone and switch might not get along that well. But I'm sure diesel fuel wouldn't be too harsh for it. Just let it "drip dry" for a day or so and wipe off good. The diesel in the switch might even help by lubing it real good!

By the way, you can still find a similar switch. I bought one from an IH truck dealer years ago. The ferrule was a bit bigger in diameter so I had to file the hole in the dash a bit larger to fit, but it worked fine. I'm sure someone else used a similar switch, just don't recall who right now.
09-03-2010 12:53 PM
MARTINSR
Quote:
Originally Posted by alittle1
Brian,

To get old hood release and heater control cables loosened, I take the cables a wind them in a circle, tie them with wire (now, using plastic snap ties) and curl them up in a pail of diesel fuel. Ever so often, I pull them out and twist the cable in a figure eight, making sure the spiral wound outer wire distorted enough to allow the diesel fuel to get into the inner cable.

This works also for speedo and emergency brake cables.
That couldn't be done with the with this one, it had a switch on it.

Brian
09-03-2010 12:40 PM
alittle1 Brian,

To get old hood release and heater control cables loosened, I take the cables a wind them in a circle, tie them with wire (now, using plastic snap ties) and curl them up in a pail of diesel fuel. Ever so often, I pull them out and twist the cable in a figure eight, making sure the spiral wound outer wire distorted enough to allow the diesel fuel to get into the inner cable.

This works also for speedo and emergency brake cables.
09-03-2010 11:34 AM
MARTINSR Interesting.

Brian
09-03-2010 09:56 AM
cobalt327 Good info!

There are motorcycle cable lubricators that are used to get lube inside the cable sleeve and not everywhere else.

The idea is to clamp the cable sleeve end w/the ferrule into the rubber sleeve, the inner cable comes out the other end. Tape or whatever can be used to build up the OD of the type cable being worked with.

Then the lube straw tip is inserted into its hole and the lube is injected into the cable sleeve.

Cost <$10. Many bike riders will already have one around the shop.

09-02-2010 06:35 PM
MARTINSR
"Basics of Basics" Control cable repair and restore.

“Basics of Basics” Control cable repair.
By Brian Martin



While working on my 1959 Rambler American the other day I was able to get a couple of rusted cables working and thought some of you may find it useful. I repaired my emergency brake cable that was rusted solid, it wouldn’t budge! The one in the car had been forced and was ruined, luckily I had a parts car with another, but it too was rusted solid. When I found the heater control cable was the same way I figured I would snap some photos and write a “basics”.

Here is the cable as I pulled it from the car. This one in particular had a fan switch as well so finding another was pretty tough.



The first thing I did was to lube it. I put it in the vice and simply dripped some lube down the cable. I added more every time I walked out in the garage over a few days. With the brake cable I had it dripping out the other end, that was my goal. But with this one I didn’t want that much, but hardly any goes in when you do this, most ends up going down the outside. So it takes adding that oil many times before I felt that it was well lubed in there.



If it is anything like my heater cable and emergency brake cable it still won’t budge. You have to be careful not to push hard on the cable if it is hanging out of the housing, it will bend VERY easy. My original e-brake cable had done just that, pushing the handle forward to release the brake simply buckled the cable and rendered it useless.

So I put it in the vice as shown so I could hold the cable (at the loop at the end that goes over the heater control valve). Holding this cable so it doesn’t bend is critical.



After gently pulling on the cable to find that it simply wouldn’t budge, I twisted the housing with a pair of channel locks gently grasping the housing as not to crush it.



This was all it took, being I had lubed it well, as soon as I twisted it breaking it free from the cable it moved in and out pretty well. I then put it back in the vice to lube it more. I pulled the cable up and put some lube and pushed it down to it would push the oil deeper in down the housing and cable. Doing this a number of more times during the day as I was working on something else (you know you always have something else to work on!) it was free as can be and works like new.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.