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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-25-2010 07:24 PM
capt546 Back in 1960, my father-in law opened a truck trailer dealership which now has over 30 bays. When originally built it, it is a very large metal building, all the center supports running across the building was 8" iron pipe. He welded the ends shut, installed nipples at about waist high for the quick connects and added a water faucet at the very bottom of every post to drain the water. They were all connected high in ceiling by black pipe. In theory the posts became air tanks. Today the system is still in use, a screw compressor replaces the old piston type and in all these years there has never been a failure. He was a welder during the war building ships and he learned alot. He past away at 93 last September. The dealership is still family owned and operated and has steadly grown larger and every add on to the building has had the same set up. So much for the theory that you should never use black pipe.
09-24-2010 03:42 PM
oldred The shed is a great idea and I built a small one attached to my garage to house a large shop vac. I used pipe also to connect to the shed and ran the large vac hose through to the unit, I have a quick connect and power switch on the wall and just roll up the hose and hang it on the wall when not in use and keep extra hose in the shed out of the way until needed. One of the best things I have done to the garage, no noise, no dust (I paint in there sometimes) and it is out of the way.
09-24-2010 12:34 PM
DadTruck the shed mentioned above sounds close to what i have, I just got lucky on the price. Was walking through Lowes last January when I saw them marking the price down on the display unit. The manufacturer / design was changing. They had the 4 units in stock priced at 119.00 each. Made my day.
The unit is all plastic, but seems sturdy, we had some heavy rains last spring stayed dry inside. I set two 2.5 diameter PVC pipes in the garage / shed wall to be access holes to pass the air hose through. I set in two as some point in time I plan to have a acetylene / oxygen set up and that shed will also house those tanks.
09-23-2010 09:48 PM
Chris Kemp
Quote:
Originally Posted by 59 wagon man
another thing you could try is baseboard fin tubing . it is 3/4" copper tubing with aluminum fins designed for use in baseboard hot water heating systems. it is available in length's up to 8' i believe.
chris if it has worked for you for 15 yrs i guess my hat is off to you
Well like I said, it is an old unit made out of good iron I'm sure. If I remember right is has 9 sections with three big threaded tie rod bolts going through it to hold all of the sections together. They are stacked side by side. I think they were made this way so they could be made longer or shorter. Anyway they are hard to find down here in Florida, and it probably came out of a big office building or school. I got it years ago from a place called Burhalter Wrecking. Didn't give much for it and at first I had planned to make a still out of it. The guys on here from up north, probably see these old radiators all the time.

Im still contemplating buying a small window unit and separating the evaporator from it and installing the the evaporator in a twenty or thirty gallon air tank. I really think that this would be the ticket for getting rid of the water. A good name small window unit $150.00, an air tank $30.00. A person could sell a unit like this for an easy thousand dollars installed to just about all of the shops in this area. Humidity is real bad down here and all of the shops I know of fight the water in their lines every day.
09-23-2010 08:22 PM
59 wagon man another thing you could try is baseboard fin tubing . it is 3/4" copper tubing with aluminum fins designed for use in baseboard hot water heating systems. it is available in length's up to 8' i believe.
chris if it has worked for you for 15 yrs i guess my hat is off to you
09-23-2010 06:53 PM
Chris Kemp
Quote:
Originally Posted by 59 wagon man
not sure i would suggest a radiator for a water separator for a few reasons
1- contanimation from oil used in cutting and threading pipe used to connect radiator.

2- rust scale and debris can work lose ruining tools or paintjob
3- not sure if a radiator is designed to hold that kind of pressure. most steam or hot water systems only operate at a few psi not 100 psi or more. not really sure if this is safe
I have been known to make things work when others couldn't, mine has been up and running for more than fifteen years. Works good! Never had a problem with debris, just blew it all out real good before I hooked it up. It is a very old but in good shape cast iron type steam radiator. I would stay away from the sheet metal type.

The best way to remove water from compressed air is to chill it. Air below thirty two degrees can not hold water. The hotter the air the more water it can hold. I have often thought about cutting open a thirty pound air tank and then installing an evaporator in it. I would use what I know as bulk head fittings to pass the freon lines though the side of the tank. I would then weld the tank back up so that what you would have would be a tank with a cooling coil inside of it.

Another thing to look at is cooling the air before it goes into the compressor. That way it would dump most of it's water before it was compressed. This could be done with a small A/C window unit.
09-23-2010 05:56 PM
59 wagon man not sure i would suggest a radiator for a water separator for a few reasons
1- contanimation from oil used in cutting and threading pipe used to connect radiator.

2- rust scale and debris can work lose ruining tools or paintjob
3- not sure if a radiator is designed to hold that kind of pressure. most steam or hot water systems only operate at a few psi not 100 psi or more. not really sure if this is safe
09-23-2010 04:28 PM
Chris Kemp Now something that you guys may not know is to use an old house steam radiator as a water trap. You can pick them up cheap at building wrecker yards. They can hold a lot of pressure and usually all that is wrong with them is bad fittings and you will change all of that anyway. Plumb it so the air from the compressor goes into the bottom at one end and leaves at the top of the other. Depending on what type you find you may have to drill and tap a hole. You may even have to use a bung and this could be brazed on or silver soldered. Place it so that air can get to both sides and put a water trap down low at the outlet side or end, I have an automatic spitter valve on mine. Be sure to slope it about an inch toward the spitter. You will be surprised at how much water it collects.

Chris
09-23-2010 03:19 PM
59 wagon man hope the pics explain it good enough sorry but it's a pic from my cell
09-23-2010 03:02 PM
59 wagon man they say it's better to give then recieve so here is some tips for you guys.
if you really mess up and overheat the fitting you will not get the solder to stick in that case you can braze right over the solder joint with brazing rod . just heat the joint till it is completely red and the rod will flow all by itself

home depot sells a shed about 6' h x 6' w x 3' d works great for a 60 gal upright compressor. no more noise in the garage and if your neighbors aren't right on top of it then it's quieter then a lawnmower. you can bolt this to the outside wall of your garage run the electric and air line thru the wall and it's hidden from view. shed runs around $300

job looks very nice dadtruck hope it works well for you

last tip would be about the valve. the gas ball valve has a short handle which works ok but the lever handle offers one advantage. if you need or want to install a shutoff valve up hihg and it is not accessable easily you can make a simple handle ext. if the vale is on the flat or horizontal pipe you can drill a hole in the handle and either bend a piece of 3/8" rod to fit thru the hole you just drilled and hang down to a height you can easily reach. i'll try and post a pic tonite when i get home to give you a better example
09-17-2010 08:16 AM
snorulz looks really good, nice job!
09-16-2010 07:01 PM
DadTruck Finished up the air compresor piping this week.
I think I did get good at soldering copper together. At the beginning I was pressure testing sections as I put them together, checking for leaks with soapy water, did not find any so I started moving forward with the assembly without on going pressure testing.
Actually went OK,,I assembled everything to the wall without solder, to get the lengths set, then took it down, assembled sub sections and put it back up,, no leaks,, seems real solid. I used doubled over aluminum foil when torching close to the painted wall, that did just fine,, per the tips on this board,, I carefully cleaned the sections to be soldered,, I bought the brushes for the ID work and the rings for the OD, put on a light coat of flux, heated evenly and soldered away.

Here are photos and the diagram.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/1371835...7624888065562/

I do not have the desiccant canisters connected in yet, I'll likley add a regulator and a pre-filter and a real good post filter.

There is 40 feet of 3/4 inch copper and 10 feet of 1/2,, so it should cool well.
thanks again.
09-11-2010 10:46 PM
59 wagon man tip for estimating solder 1" per joint up to 1"

heat the opposite side of the joint to which you will apply the solder as the flame gets a green color to it move the heat around as you apply the solder. the cappilary action will cause the solder to flow towards the heat. you can wipe the joint to remove the little snot that hangs down or to make the joint look neater .i was taught by a guy who used his finger to wipe the hot joint . just be very fast and it hardly burns at all. if you are really nervous you can try and rent a tool called a propress it causes a compression connection between the pipe and special fitting. so far it has been holding 150 psi in my system no problem very quick system to install . you may even be able to find a local plumber and see if he will just come in and press it for you . it only takes seconds to do a 3/4" joint

snorulz no offense taken and i didnt mean to sound like some pompous ******* or anything . i ve never seen an air system blow a hole unless damaged . water lines definately do wear out ,depending on the application i.e, hot water recirculation line pumping water 24/7/365 only took a few years for pipe to wear out
09-11-2010 03:29 PM
oldred Exactly what he said! The part about practice is the most important but by the time you finish you will have mastered it.


"where there is a glob or a void on the visible surface, is it OK to re heat and re smooth?"


You can do that but don't try to heat the solder directly, heat the area behind it until the solder melts and it will tend to "wick" into the joint, that is if the joint was properly prepared. If the solder does not seem to want to flow into the joint when the pipe is at the solder's melting point the problem could be some kind of contamination on the Copper inside the joint, even oil from finger prints can cause this.
09-10-2010 09:18 PM
buggyman
tttttt

As far as how much solder if you start at top and it starts to drip out bottom you should have enough but also try not to over haet thats why you want to keep touching the solder to get it to flow without excess heat just takes practrice. try using some scrap and cheaper fittings to practice a couple times you will get done good luck. keep a damp rag with you and wipe joint of after soldering to clean of excess solder and the big drip
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