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Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Garage - Tools> Vintage Lincwelder 180amp vs Hobart 110v Ideas, opinions, etc wanted
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-23-2012 09:01 PM
southerntidefan The great thing about a stick welder (mine has dc and ac outputs) is you can buy a tig torch and a bottle of gas and hook your torch to the - and ground to the + and tig weld too!
01-14-2012 01:55 PM
LATECH I would (and did) opt to get the wire welder that offers gas/no gas option.
Bottles are pricey but sooo nice to work with. You may want to use the gas later on, it is nice because the welds are much cleaner with less splatter to clean up.Nicer looking welds too.I bought a Clarke 130EN . It has been pretty good.
Them old stick welders work OK if your builing a corral out of pipe or a cattle gaurd or something and they are cool to look at, but as mentioned if you like working on them as much as working with them...welll then....
I bought a cheap generator as a backup fo my heating system ( an oil fired boiler with 2 zone pumps), makes about 15 amps continuous. I paid like 200 bucks delivered to my door, granted it is a china made job, but it only has to work one time to be worth it.If the power goes out where I am at, at least I wont freeze to death, as far as an Icebox, I just step outside...LOL
01-14-2012 12:51 PM
matts37chev
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
Matt stick welding body sheetmetal is extremely difficult and even some pros will insist it can't even be done, it can but they are not far from wrong.
I used to work with a guy that would build tanker piping (its about 16 ga.) with a stick machine
I have a hard time some days with a mig and 0.30 wire
It can be done
01-14-2012 12:39 PM
oldred Matt stick welding body sheetmetal is extremely difficult and even some pros will insist it can't even be done, it can but they are not far from wrong.
01-14-2012 08:54 AM
matts37chev if you want to stick weld and get some good practice
you could do the floor in you jeep
but you need a machine that will turn down that far, and they are harder to find

if you take your time and hunt around, you will be able to find an older stick welder for almost free
you can use it for the heavy/thick stuff

then save your money and buy a cheaper $500 lincoln or hobart wire feed

if you lived close to me, I would give you my old sears stick, because it was given to me
01-14-2012 08:43 AM
ChevelleSS_LS6 Oh crap, I think I confused you guys.


The one I'm looking at is the one in the top photos (small photos, and as you can see the unit I'm looking into is complete and such).


The faded one missing parts (larger pictures) is the closest thing to it I've found looking for info on this. I've included the 'code' (model?) number for the faded one for reference... assuming they're the same (or very similar) units. Sorry about the confusion guys!


As for the welder shown in the larger pictures, some guy on a welding forum got it from his granddad, and has plans to restore it. I think that's pretty cool. Me- I have enough projects to handle, so I'll look around and find a 'good original' like what I'm looking into buying.
01-14-2012 08:17 AM
oldred
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadMacs
L However I am restoring a welder of such vintage so to say they are "junk" isn't true.


I didn't mean that those machines were junk, far from it, those old engine driven generator type welders produced a very smooth current and were very rugged and reliable. That one however looks to be rather dilapidated with a few parts missing, That thing would be an excellent small stick welder both to use and to just have as a valuable antique but they can be very cantankerous to get set properly and VERY expensive to obtain parts for. If the engine is still capable of making nearly full power and if the governor assembly is still intact and working properly and if the generator windings/bearings, etc is still sound then it may be usable but that's a lot of ifs and as I said it could take a lot of money and effort to make a usable welder out of this thing. Worth it? You bet it is if that's what a person wants but to expect much in the condition it's in now would be chancy at best.
01-13-2012 11:13 PM
MadMacs
lincoln/ wisconsin powered arc welder

Like the guys are telling you, wire feed is the way to go. from what you have and what you bought both are DC and wont run booty/ dooty for a generator on your house or for a boombox for that matter, you would need AC power. However I am restoring a welder of such vintage so to say they are "junk" isn't true. Mine was gifted to me by my grandad, whom has since passed away, but he bought the welder brand new in 1958 for 400.oo It has a smooth start and easily burns 1/8th 6010, 6011, 6013, 7018, 7024, all damn day long. 3/16th and 5/32 stretches the workload a bit but it can do it. These machines were built for "real iron" 1/8 and up to 1/2 inch metal not 14 ga to 10 ga metal.So keep it and enjoy it as you will or pass it along to an antiquer who will appreciate what you have found
01-13-2012 09:53 PM
oldred
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevelleSS_LS6
How thin of metal have you guys 'stick' welded? I don't plan on pop cans, but new floors for my Jeep are in the plans for this, and frame repair for a vintage Allis Chalmers garden tractor (model B10)Matt

IF that thing stills runs good it might make a decent small stick welder but from the age and apparent condition I would suspect current control problems linked to engine control issues. Unless you really enjoy working on something like this as much as working with it you might want to consider another welder, still if it does operate properly and does not lose a lot of power on the initial arc start (the usual problem with these old engine driven machines) it may be useful.

Now about that Jeep floor, don't even think of trying that with a stick welder! I am not saying it can't be done BUT trust me it takes extreme talent and extremely good welding equipment to do it.
01-13-2012 08:32 PM
matts37chev I say keep saving
you need to spend about $500. then you can get a nice 110v machine that will weld 3/16" or 1/4"
01-13-2012 08:12 PM
ChevelleSS_LS6
Vintage Lincwelder 180amp vs Hobart 110v Ideas, opinions, etc wanted

so, this baby (Lincoln) looks like a 'survivor', basically mint other than a minor cleanup.






much better than this other one I've found online...



Anyways, the 'one I've found online' which I assume to be the same 'code' is...
Serial: 4283487
Code: 1402
link to other welder info... if you're interested.

So, the things I'm interested in are...
is this an AC or a DC welder? I'm told that DC welders are easier to strike an arc and lay a better bead compared to AC units. Is there a way to use this as a generator (granted I wouldn't expect it to put out 'clean' electric to run a computer on, but if it keeps the fridge going during a power outage, good enough for me.)

I'm also considering a Hobart 125EZ (I think that's the right model... flux core wire feed welder, their entry level one on their website. No provisions for shielding gas) at the pawn shop for $225. Looks to be in good shape, and being made here in the USA doesn't hurt. It does run off 110, so I wonder if it's any good for much more than exhaust tubing and spot/stitch welds.

How thin of metal have you guys 'stick' welded? I don't plan on pop cans, but new floors for my Jeep are in the plans for this, and frame repair for a vintage Allis Chalmers garden tractor (model B10)

Yup, I am biased toward the Lincoln, since I have an interest in 'all things motor', so having a wisconsin engine has my interest here... simple 'ol brutes. Gotta love oil bath air cleaners, too. Good stuff so many people of my generation (I'm 26) are too young to have experienced. The Hobart is a lot smaller, no storage problems (I'll probably store the Lincoln in Grandpa's barn amongst countless IH/Farmall tractors/parts until I can build a trailer for it and a secure cover (so the trailer can sit outside, and the welder is secure from the elements).

Well, any input, any ideas of offers I should make, let me know.
Matt

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