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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-01-2012 12:34 PM
Old Fool
Quote:
Originally Posted by barry425
There is a danger in cooling the air going into a compressor tank. The compressor is designed to run the way it is from the factory, and cooling the air going into the tank could cause the pressure to go too high and burst the tank. I have a 60 gallon single stage vertical compressor that works just fine. All my air tools have enough air for continuous running. Why is this intercooler necessary in the first place?
For a tank to burst it must be subjected to pressures higher than its physical strength, which can happen if the safety relief valve was to fail. Safety relief valves are temp rated, 250f to 500f is common. Cooler air entering the storage tank will keep the air temps more within range IF the tank is equipped with a 250f relief.


Air temps within reason will not harm the structural integrity of a supply tank.

The pressure switch is designed for a normal operating range, which is quite adequate for both low and elevated tempertures it may be exposed to.

Your air compressor may have a Square- D pressure switch as it is very commonly used.

A typical SQ-D pressure switch has an operational temperture of -22f to +257f

130 psi @ 76F will not burst the tank any sooner than 130 psi @ 196f.

Think of it like this, you are using your compressor and it runs and shuts off a number of times, the air tank is now hot and has 125psi in it. It now sets until tomorrow and cools off to ambient temperture. Some air is used and the compressor turns back on, only runs a minute and shuts off again. the temp in the tank didnt rise as much this time due to the short running cycle time. The air pressure is the same 125 psi, but the temp of it is lower.

A concern of tank life is corrosion. hot air when cooled causes condensation to form. This water then lays in the bottom of the supply tank and causes rust. Over time the tank gets thinner and a leak develops.

Corrosion will cause pin holes which leak , get larger leak more, etc.

Some air compressors will have an intercooler between the supply tank and the compressor head. Usually found on 2 stage units.



The intent of my intercooler is to cool the air before it enters the tank, giving the moisture a chance to drop out of suspension before it proceeds to the end usage.
I have an auto drain that trips every 30 seconds for 2 seconds to drain this moisture out of the supply tank.

Drier air is the end result. Since installing the intercooler and auto drain I have not had any moisture accumulate in the water filter/regulator assembly.
03-01-2012 12:01 PM
barry425
intercooled compressor?

There is a danger in cooling the air going into a compressor tank. The compressor is designed to run the way it is from the factory, and cooling the air going into the tank could cause the pressure to go too high and burst the tank. I have a 60 gallon single stage vertical compressor that works just fine. All my air tools have enough air for continuous running. Why is this intercooler necessary in the first place?
02-13-2012 01:02 PM
ogre nice air cooler/dryer...
your a lucky man, i look for that type of used radiant tube every time i go to the scrapyard.
02-13-2012 05:40 AM
Old Fool
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
Leaving an update on my cooling rack for my compressor.
I have been using my blast cabinet a fair amount and I have to say I am pretty happy with the amount of water I am collecting in the drop leg of the rack vs. a very minimal amount coming out of the compressor storage tank. I am not seeing any moisture past my filter separator during extended run times.
I had posted before of my inlet and outlet temps during one cycle, I had a inlet temp of 128 vs. an outlet temp of 75, with extended running I am seeing inlet temps of 185 vs outlets of 78-80 degrees. This is with the garage being 70 degrees. I am getting my readings with a infrared temp gun at the inlet and outlet fittings.
One quirk that caught me by surprise a little was the first time the compressor shut down after filling the tank, the unloader valve has to bleed off the additional air in the rack.
/

I experianced that same thing, made me think for a minute what I had messed something up, lol.

I installed a Wilkerson auto drain ($65) on the drip leg and an electric auto drain ($90)on the compressor tank.

Someday I am going to get my refrigerated units connected, but . . . .
02-12-2012 06:52 PM
1ownerT
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Fool
Very similiar to how I made my latest intercooler. 1 inch fin tube and a 20 inch box fan.

I temp'd it with red hose to confirm function.
It now has stainless braided hose.
I still need to make a decent frame work for it.

On a 72f day it was capable of returning the air to ambient temp before it entered the storage tank.
Nice!
The fan has to help, I considered one but where mine is mounted to the wall and the location of the compressor, the "fan" on the compressor flywheel keeps air moving pretty well around mine.
02-12-2012 06:47 PM
matts37chev I really like these ideas guys

but I am just going to start calling my storage tank, a cooling tank instead

and now I have a cooler also,
02-12-2012 06:38 PM
Old Fool
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
Today I took two 6' sections of 1" copper pipe (radiant heat) fin tube connected them together w/fittings, mounted vertically on the wall with a drop drain leg.
I am going to attach my compressor to this, it is for cooling the air during extended run times. My idea is to remove the copper tube that connects from the outlet of the pump to the storage tank and run a line from the pump outlet to the cooling rack then from the cooling rack, reconnect to the storage tank.
Alternative is to connect the rack to the outlet of the compressor storage tank. In my mind cooling the air before it goes into the tank would be preferred to cooling after it leaves the tank.

Does this sound like the way to go?
Very similiar to how I made my latest intercooler. 1 inch fin tube and a 20 inch box fan.

I temp'd it with red hose to confirm function.
It now has stainless braided hose.
I still need to make a decent frame work for it.

On a 72f day it was capable of returning the air to ambient temp before it entered the storage tank.

02-11-2012 10:41 PM
1ownerT Leaving an update on my cooling rack for my compressor.
I have been using my blast cabinet a fair amount and I have to say I am pretty happy with the amount of water I am collecting in the drop leg of the rack vs. a very minimal amount coming out of the compressor storage tank. I am not seeing any moisture past my filter separator during extended run times.
I had posted before of my inlet and outlet temps during one cycle, I had a inlet temp of 128 vs. an outlet temp of 75, with extended running I am seeing inlet temps of 185 vs outlets of 78-80 degrees. This is with the garage being 70 degrees. I am getting my readings with a infrared temp gun at the inlet and outlet fittings.
One quirk that caught me by surprise a little was the first time the compressor shut down after filling the tank, the unloader valve has to bleed off the additional air in the rack.
12-21-2011 03:43 AM
1ownerT
Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
they are just a spring loaded valve with a cord attached
so when you pull on the cord, they open up and drain the water out, until you let go and it closes

no bending over and twisting valves, just stand there and yank
Makes sense...I should have thought of that.
12-20-2011 06:46 PM
matts37chev
Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
now, you need a pull cord type drain so you can drain it quickly and easily, whenever you walk by
i use them on the bottom of my compressor tank and the systems drain legs that i cant get to easily
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
Pretty slick, I looked at your link, how long does it bleed before shutting off?
they are just a spring loaded valve with a cord attached
so when you pull on the cord, they open up and drain the water out, until you let go and it closes

no bending over and twisting valves, just stand there and yank
12-20-2011 06:29 PM
1ownerT
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
Personally I think it's going to help a lot, if you collected any water at all after only one cycle then you have your collection points positioned properly. The most efficient dryer possible would collect only a very small amount in that short run period even with fairly high humidity so I think you are going to find that your efforts are going to be well worth the time and money spent.
I was wondering about the amount collected, it dribbled very little. I will have to give it a workout and see what the results are.
You mention money spent, I was quite surprised how much 1" copper fittings run. I had the fin tube from a job, the misc. fittings, stand offs for the rack, and lines and fittings to connect it to the compressor ran me $120.
12-20-2011 06:23 PM
1ownerT
Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
looks good to me, every little bits gotta help
Thanks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by matts37chev
now, you need a pull cord type drain so you can drain it quickly and easily, whenever you walk by
because if you are going to be running that compressor a lot in the future, its going to pulling out a ton of water
i use them on the bottom of my compressor tank and the systems drain legs that i cant get to easily
Pretty slick, I looked at your link, how long does it bleed before shutting off?
12-20-2011 09:04 AM
matts37chev now, you need a pull cord type drain so you can drain it quickly and easily, whenever you walk by
because if you are going to be running that compressor a lot in the future, its going to pulling out a ton of water
i use them on the bottom of my compressor tank and the systems drain legs that i cant get to easily
12-20-2011 07:46 AM
oldred
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
after 1 cycle of filling the tank, there is little water in my trap.


Personally I think it's going to help a lot, if you collected any water at all after only one cycle then you have your collection points positioned properly. The most efficient dryer possible would collect only a very small amount in that short run period even with fairly high humidity so I think you are going to find that your efforts are going to be well worth the time and money spent.
12-19-2011 07:28 PM
matts37chev looks good to me, every little bits gotta help
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