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Thread: Sewing Machine Servo Motor Recommendation? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-06-2013 09:49 AM
GT500tow I'm not any good at sewing, so here's what i had to do. My cheap servo motor came as a package deal with the machine and i wasn't going to buy another. This was the fix and it works awesome.

02-05-2013 08:57 AM
bentwings I know..I did that just to try it back when you noted it before. The noise is incredible. haha I'll add to that, I build big model airplanes and use aircraft plywood which is usually 5 layer birch. It will go thru that too but it did cost me a needle. I think I flinched and made the walking foot slip as the needle hit something and bent it a little. I think this new servo motor has even more power than the clutch motor.........I haven't even been able to give that thing away.

One of the upholstery related things I made for the giant scale warbirds was a leather cover over the opening at the rear of a B-25 rear gun port. These were typically leather in WW 2 so I salvaged a dark leather lady's purse and cut some leather from it. I then sculptured a wrinkled balsa surface underlayment. I covered this with the fine soft well worn purse leather and installed it over the guns and into the gun port. It looks quite realistic.

I wish I would have had this machine back when I was training dogs. It sure would have come in handy to make and repair some of our leather and jute training equipment.
02-05-2013 06:35 AM
DanTwoLakes You can sew through 1/4" luan plywood with no problem if you want to.
02-04-2013 09:27 PM
bentwings I did a little more work with the new servo motor conversion.

After looking over the modification noted above I decided to try and change the arm ratio.

I drilled a series of holes in the side of the treadle and reinstalled the "throttle" arm link. This give a much more progressive speed increase, however it still requires a steady foot. I don't have any problem with this as I use a foot pedal with my TIG welder and I can use either foot with equal ease. I think I will add a little spring tension to give a better feel to the treadle. It will be stiffer and more like the TIG pedal. Just a personal preference. For reference my link hole is 1 3/4" from the center of the treadle pivot.

Someone mentioned sewing thru 8 layers of vinyl. So I tried this after practicing running straight stiches and some curved ones. I began folding the test piece over and running some more stiches. I also tried slow and faster rates. Eventually I got to 8 layers and even at the very slowest speed the machine will plow right thru and pull the thread tight. High speed is no contest. I couldn't fold the piece up any more so I just added a top and bottom layer and it punched right thru again. That's as thick of stack as will fit under the foot on my machine. This is with the 90mm pulley. I was going to get the 50mm pulley but I think I'll hold off and see if there is a need.

Love this servo motor!!!
01-29-2013 03:08 PM
beachbum jim
Quote:
Originally Posted by John long View Post
I always read this thread with interest but have not posted lately because I did not feel I had anything more to contribute.

What I noticed most about changing to a 50mm pulley on my Adler 267 was the increased power at lower speeds. The smaller pulley does cut the speed in half but also doubles the mechanical advantage of the motor giving you much more control at lower speed. The machine will still run as fast as you will ever need.

Dan is the professional and his advise is always right on. I am just offering my observations as a guy who does his personal sewing and has made this change. It has really been a good thing for me.

John L
Thanks John, thats what I was trying to say. I am a doer not a teacher so to speak.
Dan is a wealth of knowledge and I have learned from his posts.
01-29-2013 11:24 AM
John long Agreed. Even a true servo motor could benefit from a smaller pulley though. When you put a pipe on the end of a ratchet handle it does not make you any stronger. It only gives you increased mechanical advantage. Same principle here.

John L
01-29-2013 10:50 AM
DanTwoLakes If what we are calling here a servo motor was a true servo motor, it would have constant torque throughout the entire speed range. True servos are used for precise indexing and positioning applications in industry.

The servos used on sewing machines are not true servos, so you are right that there is more mechanical advantage ( torque ) at lower speeds, and less at higher speeds.
01-29-2013 10:30 AM
John long I always read this thread with interest but have not posted lately because I did not feel I had anything more to contribute.

What I noticed most about changing to a 50mm pulley on my Adler 267 was the increased power at lower speeds. The smaller pulley does cut the speed in half but also doubles the mechanical advantage of the motor giving you much more control at lower speed. The machine will still run as fast as you will ever need.

Dan is the professional and his advise is always right on. I am just offering my observations as a guy who does his personal sewing and has made this change. It has really been a good thing for me.

John L
01-29-2013 09:04 AM
DanTwoLakes No problem. I did my math wrong, using the 50MM pulley to replace the standard 90MM pulley would reduce the sewing machine speed by 56%, not 40%.
01-29-2013 08:46 AM
beachbum jim Thats cool... I see what you are saying.
01-29-2013 08:39 AM
DanTwoLakes
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachbum jim View Post
I Never said it was a weakness to use the hand wheel I just said I dont have too. Believe me I use it plenty. When I had the 3480 rpm clutch motor on my machine, I had to use the hand wheel alot. And yes I hold the thread ends, didnt think that needed to be said.
I wasn't questioning your skill level or anything else, just pointing out to others who read this that don't have more than beginner skills with the sewing machine that avoiding using the hand wheel is not a positive and that there is a reason the hand wheel is there. You put the 50 MM pulley on your motor to slow it down 40%, and that's fine, but others who read this may not understand.
01-29-2013 01:03 AM
Coodeville
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes View Post
The correct way to start sewing is by holding the thread with your left hand and using the hand wheel to penetrate what you are sewing. This prevents the thread from tangling or jamming. It is not a sign of weakness or lack of skill to use the hand wheel, it is there for a reason.
I use it all the time.
01-28-2013 08:21 PM
beachbum jim I Never said it was a weakness to use the hand wheel I just said I dont have too. Believe me I use it plenty. When I had the 3480 rpm clutch motor on my machine, I had to use the hand wheel alot. And yes I hold the thread ends, didnt think that needed to be said.
01-28-2013 04:07 PM
DanTwoLakes
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachbum jim View Post
. ".......With the 50mm pulley I dont have to use the hand wheel to start or to stitch slow enough around tight corners, and it is still fast enough to sew long straight lines.
The correct way to start sewing is by holding the thread with your left hand and using the hand wheel to penetrate what you are sewing. This prevents the thread from tangling or jamming. It is not a sign of weakness or lack of skill to use the hand wheel, it is there for a reason.
01-28-2013 02:49 PM
beachbum jim When I bought my machine back in 1989-90. I didnt know anything about industrial sewing machines or clutch motors. It wasnt until a few years ago I discovered they make two different speed clutch motors. One is 1720/1740 rpm, this is for heavy duty upholstery work. The other is 3460/3480 rpm and is used for light weight garment/sail making. My machine had the 3480 rpm clutch motor and it was like sewing with your sewing machine powered by a top fuel dragster engine. It was very hard to control and sewing straight lines was nearly impossible.
The new SQ5000 powering my Adler 267 is pure luxury. With the 50mm pulley I dont have to use the hand wheel to start or to stitch slow enough around tight corners, and it is still fast enough to sew long straight lines.
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