Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board - Reply to Topic
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior> cutting compound black haze
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Thread: cutting compound black haze Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
10-06-2012 06:28 PM
mr4speed I will agree with tech69 as I also do not use the heavy cut compound on any color especially black. Your typical high grade compounds will generally get rid of 2000 grit scratches without the need for a heavy cut. Still not sure if your using base clear or SS. Regardless of that or what grit sand scratches your trying to get rid of, when you are finished with the compounding you should have a super glossy high depth finish with no haze at all whether your using wool or foam. Because when you move on to the polish stage that will not remove any haze or dullness in the finish. It must be done in the compounding stage.
10-05-2012 09:44 AM
tech69 your heavy duty supercut compound should be getting it out quickly. Maybe it sat for too long. I do not use a super aggressive compound on black. I first clean my wool pad completely with water, then run it on fast using a spur, then get it moist by rubbing in compound. Then I buff. It usually takes me 6-10 slow passes in one area before I go to the next area. I like to buff moving slowly. No need to be all over the place like a hack cause then you'll miss spots. I'm done when the surface looks like it has already been polished. You can also get to the point of polish and stop and do something else for a few weeks in case it wants to shrink up more on you. In any case, don't judge it til all the afro sheen is off the car and you have a true look on whether it's ready for polish. Then once I know it looks ready for polish I compound it again with a foam pad. Last I polish.
10-03-2012 10:25 PM
paint dude Try using the wool to just rid of your sand scratches, and use a spur to clean pad often, Then I would switch to a foam pad, they make different ones so you will need to decide, Wash car from all the previous compound before you use the foam and the next polish, Usually around 1000-1200 rpm, work a panel at a time and also clean that pad often also, a toothbrush type brush works great, Polish to a high gloss watching your product and the surface. Good luck.
10-03-2012 06:45 PM
Mr. Fixit
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mach1460 View Post
Im having some slight hazing on my fresh black paint. How do I know when im done with my heavy cutting compound and ready to switch to finish cut?

As I went along I started in the rear passenger side and worked all the way around the back, as I got to the other side my wool pad was heavily "filled/soaked" with compound and there was a night and day difference from each side of the vehicle. The passenger side turned out pretty good with some slight hazing. I re buffed the driver side but still have some haze, Im using Wizards Turbo Cut and Finish cut for compounds. Any tips?? Im in constant fear of burning through so maybe im moving to fast???
First off all, I am going to assume that you used a single stage urethane, but if this isn't correct, please advise. When I have done this type of paint job in black, I wet sand to 1000 with a few drops of dish washing soap in the water.

I typically use a yellow foam pad with my cutting compound at a slow speed in lieu of the wool pad since it is much more controllable, especially if you don't do this type of work every day. Once I am satisfied the very fine scratch removal, I switch to the gray pad with the finishing glaze.

If you want to eliminate some of the sanding and stay with the wool pad, it is very important to keep it clean. I am not a professional at this, just have had a lot of experience with black single stage. I hope that this is helpful. I imagine that the pros will offer more info.

Good luck...
10-03-2012 06:23 PM
Mach1460
cutting compound black haze

Im having some slight hazing on my fresh black paint. How do I know when im done with my heavy cutting compound and ready to switch to finish cut?

As I went along I started in the rear passenger side and worked all the way around the back, as I got to the other side my wool pad was heavily "filled/soaked" with compound and there was a night and day difference from each side of the vehicle. The passenger side turned out pretty good with some slight hazing. I re buffed the driver side but still have some haze, Im using Wizards Turbo Cut and Finish cut for compounds. Any tips?? Im in constant fear of burning through so maybe im moving to fast???

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.