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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-26-2012 04:49 PM
painted jester
Quote:
Originally Posted by E.Furgal View Post
rollerized lifer cams or rollerized cams.. that ran in roller cam bearings?
Are you asking a question you need an answer for? Because the difference is very simple ! (I never heard of rollerized cams!) I have used rollerized cam bearings and the last ones I installed the block machining for it was $700.00! A little expensive for most people and not needed for most engines the lead Babbitt bearings work well enough !unless you want extended life for race type abused engines or industrial engines that run 24 hrs. a day 365 days a year ! When you say "roller cam' its understood by most engine builders and cam co.'s that your talking about a cam ground and designed for roller lifters! Usually an engine builder uses rollerized cam bearings after many Babbitt bearing failures! Or is running them to head them off On very expensive engines!

I hope this answers your question

Jester
10-26-2012 08:03 AM
cobalt327
Quote:
Originally Posted by painted jester View Post
A lot of young hot rodders and enthusiasts think roller cams are a new innovation! LOL

Jester
That IS funny. Roller cams were factory original on H-D, going at least as far back as the '20s.

For that matter my '64 Panhead had a roller cam/lifters. Hydraulic, at that.


Aftermarket hydraulic roller lifters for '53-up H-D. Note how large the roller is.
10-26-2012 07:14 AM
E.Furgal
Quote:
Originally Posted by painted jester View Post
This has nothing to do with the tread : I ran roller cams back in the 1960s, and my father did in the 50s!! With Zddp!!! A lot of young hot rodders and enthusiasts think roller cams are a new innovation! LOL

Jester
rollerized lifer cams or rollerized cams.. that ran in roller cam bearings?
10-25-2012 09:46 PM
painted jester Roller Camshafts - Car Craft Magazine

Jester
10-25-2012 06:38 PM
painted jester
Quote:
Originally Posted by techinspector1 View Post
I haven't been able to pin down the first automotive roller cam. I know the first automotive hemi was the 1912 Peugeot Grand Prix motor.


Jester
10-25-2012 05:42 PM
techinspector1
Quote:
Originally Posted by painted jester View Post
A lot of young hot rodders and enthusiasts think roller cams are a new innovation! Jester
I haven't been able to pin down the first automotive roller cam. I know the first automotive hemi was the 1912 Peugeot Grand Prix motor.
10-25-2012 04:36 PM
painted jester This has nothing to do with the tread : I ran roller cams back in the 1960s, and my father did in the 50s!! With Zddp!!! A lot of young hot rodders and enthusiasts think roller cams are a new innovation! LOL

Jester
10-25-2012 02:55 PM
oldbogie
Quote:
Originally Posted by against all odds View Post
i would agree in principle, but what, exactly, would be needed to be done to a gen 1 SBC to convert it over to roller lifters?
Read the last paragraph of my post. This is for a Gen I that has no provision for the OEM roller. Probably the easiest and least cost approach is to locate a pick-up with a provisioned block, many were used with flat tappet cams in them from 1986 through 1995. For 350 roller tappet blocks look for casting numbers 10243880, 14011148, 14088526, and 14093638. There is a block in this period casting number 14101148 this is a flat tappet truck block, its casting number is very similar to 14011148 which is a roller provisioned block. the 880 is the L31 Vortec block but it actually starts to show up in 95 production with a flat tappet cam and the pre L31 steel timing cover.

Bogie
10-25-2012 12:47 PM
against all odds
Quote:
Originally Posted by engine24355 View Post
Okay, thanks for all of the great information. All I am running is a mild pretty much stock Chevy small block (vortec) with a roller cam...headers with glass packs and that is it. It is a new engine so I want to make sure it is protected well. Sounds like I just need to run some Rotella or similar.

Thanks!

Well, if you have rollers then you can run "any old" oil. The controversy is for people like me, who live in the stone age, who still run flat lifters.
10-25-2012 12:46 PM
against all odds
Quote:
Originally Posted by techinspector1 View Post
ZDDP is an extreme pressure lubricant that is necessary to prevent scuffing when using a flat tappet hydraulic or flat tappet solid lifter camshaft. No such extreme pressure lubricant is needed with roller tappets. Just clean off the preservative oil that the factory puts on them to prevent corrosion, dip them in off-the-shelf engine oil, install 'em and run 'em.

Here's a tutorial showing the procedures to prevent "fraggin" a flat tappet camshaft....
http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/w...ips_and_tricks

In today's world, it makes little sense to jump through all the hoops to use flat tappets, when for just a little more dough, you can install rollers and forget about it. There may be better deals around, but Competition Products sells a set of Howards retrofit hydraulic roller lifters and a roller cam for about $600. Add a Howards composite distributor gear for about $100 and you're done. No worries, no headaches and much better performance due to the increased "area under curve" of the roller cam.
i would agree in principle, but what, exactly, would be needed to be done to a gen 1 SBC to convert it over to roller lifters?
10-25-2012 11:54 AM
engine24355 Okay, thanks for all of the great information. All I am running is a mild pretty much stock Chevy small block (vortec) with a roller cam...headers with glass packs and that is it. It is a new engine so I want to make sure it is protected well. Sounds like I just need to run some Rotella or similar.

Thanks!
10-24-2012 05:40 PM
hcompton Rotella covers about 25 oils all for different types of engines. They have oil for trucks older than 2010. They also have the new stuff and off road for equipment.

Zddp does not trash your cats it shortens the life of them in engines burning oil. Zddp and cats have been mated together for 30 years its just better for the cats if its not in there. Your car will still be just fine with it. Your cats will still go for 100k miles if the engine runs clean.

Yep the cam is important but not all of your worries when it comes to breakin. Alot of other parts really need the additives. Roller or not. It wouldnt hurt your roller cam either since it is still under alot of stress and friction. But the cam gets tons of oil other parts of the engine dont see pressurised oil. These parts still need some protections.

Bearings are made from a molly and zinc compond. Ever wonder what you were rubbing off everytime you ran your thumb across a new bearing.

I am stunned at the crap ppl give flat tappet cams. 99% of the problem is ppl trying to find more "area under the curve". Cam manufactures have an issue with new cams because there not for new engines. All the best designs have pattens on then but the cam makers still put out new cams every year. How many of the new grinds do you think are better? You can only slice up 360 so many ways. Before you start putting out crap.

Eos is good as well. Its out there on shelves for a reason.
10-24-2012 03:18 PM
E.Furgal
Quote:
Originally Posted by F-BIRD'88 View Post
The new Rotella T oil still have Zinc in it. Just not as much.
It's still very good oil. They just adjusted the anti-wear formulation.
There is a lot more to it than just the Zinc.

Its still one of the best oils you can buy.

There are still lots and lots of speciality "racing" oils that still have all the zinc you will ever need.
It is the over the counter-off the shelf- parts store passenger car motor oil that got the reduction in Zinc.
not sure if the shell you get up there is the same as the usa.. but the epa emmission laws on over the road deisels... they pulled most of the zinc out.. as the converter in the 2010 up trucks can't live , and the epa mandated they last x amount of miles...
telling people to use big rig oil was good info years ago.. and may still be up in canada.. but not in the land of the EPA
10-24-2012 02:58 PM
engine24355 So should I just use Rotella or similar to be safe?
10-24-2012 02:54 PM
1Gary Not necessary related to a roller cam and zink,but a common mistake guys make it when priming oil system they over prime it washing away the break-in lube.The correct way to do it is the 1/2 drill motor will slow down once while filling the oil pump and once again while filling the oil galleries.You should stop priming at that point.
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