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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-18-2004 10:51 AM
BT61 Great, Thanks!
01-18-2004 07:33 AM
302 Z28
Quote:
Originally posted by BT61
OK, I'm confused. I have my TIG welder hard wired with 20' of 8/3 to a 100amp breaker. I keep the extra cord looped over the back of the welder. Should I have it laid out doubled back on itself instead of coiled?
What you are doing is perfectly fine. There will be very little, if any electromagnetic effect generated by the remaining looped wire.

Vince
01-17-2004 06:44 PM
BT61 OK, I'm confused. I have my TIG welder hard wired with 20' of 8/3 to a 100amp breaker. I keep the extra cord looped over the back of the welder. Should I have it laid out doubled back on itself instead of coiled?
01-13-2004 04:56 AM
302 Z28
Quote:
Originally posted by Huskinhano
302, I fiquired you meant that but wanted to clarify it to the members who didn't know that.


Vince
01-12-2004 08:42 AM
Huskinhano 302, I fiquired you meant that but wanted to clarify it to the members who didn't know that.
01-10-2004 07:51 AM
302 Z28
Quote:
Originally posted by Huskinhano
Well yes and no. If it's the cord feeding the welder, most likely not. But definately if it's either the single wire for the anode or electrode coiled up and even more so if you put iron in the middle, such as a drum. Now you've created a "choke" that creates impeadence. As long as all conductors for a circuit are bundled together, their magnetic fields on each wire cancel out.
I agree completely, I was refering to earlier comments about coiling extension cords.

Thanks
Vince
01-09-2004 12:47 PM
Huskinhano
Quote:
Originally posted by 302/Z28
And...it will not hurt if the wire remains coiled.

Vince

Well yes and no. If it's the cord feeding the welder, most likely not. But definately if it's either the single wire for the anode or electrode coiled up and even more so if you put iron in the middle, such as a drum. Now you've created a "choke" that creates impeadence. As long as all conductors for a circuit are bundled together, their magnetic fields on each wire cancel out.
01-09-2004 11:02 AM
302 Z28 And...it will not hurt if the wire remains coiled.

Vince
01-08-2004 08:25 AM
willys36@aol.com Hey you wire heads keep talking. This is one of the most informative threads I have ever read on this site!!
01-08-2004 08:12 AM
Huskinhano
Help from a electrician!

I'm a licensed electrician by trade in NJ. As far as welders go in the code book, the gauge of the wire is determined BY THE SIZE OF THE WELDER AND DUTY CYCLE, NOT THE CIRCUIT BREAKER SIZE. Welders aren't continious duty. They have a very short duty cycle and as such, the wire is derated in size. It could be very possible to use #10 AMG for a 60 amp welder! At 240V, I would not be worried about voltage drop. Comparing a 240 volt circuit compared to a 120 volt circuit, both operating at the same wattage, the 240 volt circuit could be 4 times longer in distance before voltage drop becomes a problem. Ohms law.

Most likely you'll need 10/3 SJ or SJO cord, 50 foot will be no problem. You do not need a neutral because you do not have a 120 volt load.

Welders are covered under article 630 in the NEC
01-08-2004 07:52 AM
Hellzapoppin I think you'll find that the biggest problem with leaving extension cables coiled up is the danger of fire caused by the cable acting as a coil. Mig welders draw a lot more amps than computer cables.
During my time in the services as a lineman I actually saw a drum of partially uncoiled cable melt because of this.

Better safe than sorry.

Hellz
12-08-2003 11:19 PM
lluciano77
Quote:
Originally posted by bullheimer
oh yeah, just one small note to everybody. when using an extention cord, if you leave any of it coiled up, IT WILL CUT THE AMPACITY OF THE WIRE so always unroll it as much as possible when using something with a big load, like your welder
Dah! Come on. Not the transformer theory. You should see how many miles of sealtight flex are coiled up under computer floors. You don't loose anything worth talking about.

Quote:
Originally posted by 302/Z28
It is common NEC (National Electrical Code) practice to protect #10 AWG wire with a 30 amp fuse or breaker, #12 is 20 amp, #14 is 15 amp. These figures can vary slightly depending on the wire type and installation., but as a general rule these figures are good

It is also standard engineering practice to size wire at 125% of full load. At 19.5 amps with 4/C #10, you are way under the max load....start welding.

Vince
That is out of 310-16, but you have to use the correction factor for more than three current carrying conductors in 310-15(b)(2)(a), which is 80%. You are still okay at #10.
12-04-2003 01:37 PM
k2mooch I put mine together from a local electrical supply house. I got 20ft (I forgot what guage) but it's for outdoor use. The thick rubber jacket is what determines the price in most cases. As long as you're using it inside a shop in dry conditions, you don't really need it. But you never really know when a puddle shows up in the garage, so I got the outdoor one.


MoocH
12-02-2003 10:45 AM
intercooled Greetings,

I realize that this is a little late for the originator however for

230 Volt Extension Cord features 25' of 8/3 power cable with molded NEMA 6.50 (pin) male (plug) and female (receptacle) at each end.

also available in optional 50' length.

This extension is ideal for your 230 Volt welder and will mate up with all standard Miller, Hobart and ESAB 230 Volt welders with factory supplied power cords and plugs.

FREE STANDARD GROUND SHIPPING WITHIN CONTINENTAL U.S.


http://store.cyberweld.com/230voexco25.html
10-07-2003 10:47 AM
bullheimer oh yeah, just one small note to everybody. when using an extention cord, if you leave any of it coiled up, IT WILL CUT THE AMPACITY OF THE WIRE so always unroll it as much as possible when using something with a big load, like your welder
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