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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-06-2013 12:27 PM
itsjusti I know this doesnt help much but I think no matter which one you finally go with/fab worked flipping it upside down would look real good. With the curviture of the rear on each side with the bumper flipped it would give the whole rearend an hour glass look.
05-06-2013 07:34 AM
MARTINSR
Quote:
Originally Posted by astroracer View Post
Don't be shy about using "other" materials to make the shapes you want/need. I used 2", 3" and 5" diameter muffler tubing to make parts of the bumper I built for my truck. The rest is 10 and 16 gage steel.


I will be going thru this same process when I build the bumper for my van project.
Go ahead and weld on the front. Grind it down to get the welds smooth. Shy away from brazing if you are going to plate it. Brazing "works" different then steel and it will leave a shadow that you will see after plating. It is impossible to polish the two materials together and get them to be at the same "surface", if you know what I mean.
Mark
Mark, you are absolutely right! I have never used brass for this and didn't have any advice but the simple fact that the brass is softer than the metal would make "surfacing" it equal very difficult!

Brian
05-06-2013 04:24 AM
astroracer Don't be shy about using "other" materials to make the shapes you want/need. I used 2", 3" and 5" diameter muffler tubing to make parts of the bumper I built for my truck. The rest is 10 and 16 gage steel.


I will be going thru this same process when I build the bumper for my van project.
Go ahead and weld on the front. Grind it down to get the welds smooth. Shy away from brazing if you are going to plate it. Brazing "works" different then steel and it will leave a shadow that you will see after plating. It is impossible to polish the two materials together and get them to be at the same "surface", if you know what I mean.
Mark
04-26-2013 01:52 PM
MARTINSR Filling the seam with brass is an idea but getting it smooth is the problem. If your metal is perfectly straight and all you have is the brass you can remove the excess brass with a 3M Roloc "surface conditioning" disc. It's a neat tool and will remove the softer brass while leaving the harder metal untouched.



But welding it is usually going to cause some distortion that needs grinding to true. So what you have now, I don't know.

Brian
04-26-2013 01:41 PM
renegade6 I did the welding on the plate behind the bumper due to the challenge with getting them smooth. The plan is to fill in the seam and minor holes by brazing them.
04-26-2013 12:10 PM
MARTINSR If you plan on chroming that bumper (I think you mentioned that) finishing off welds down in the corner like that is going to be VERY difficult, like darn near impossible. Butt welding a bumper like that and grinding it flat and prepping for chrome, easy as pie. But something like that would be very difficult to finish off straight and uniform. Even the upper parts that bolt together will be difficult to finish off likely requiring a few passes to fill up the V. Simply butt welding would be much easier.

Brian
04-24-2013 04:21 PM
renegade6
Front bumper

OK, looking for the easier thing to do, I went ahead and did some work on my front bumper.

I purchased a piece of 11 gauge sheet metal and had the welding shop put a bend in the center. I cut off the original center bumper mount brackets to make it easier to get the plate lined up and I will either weld these back on after I finish the plate or make some new ones out of angle iron.

My debate now is whether or not to cut the bottom of straight or, put a roll in it.
04-21-2013 02:23 PM
NEW INTERIORS
Quote:
Originally Posted by renegade6 View Post
Tools are one of my big limitations. Being in the Army, I have a weight allowance for how much they will move for me. The 80 gallon compressor that I just purchased is definitely going to add up

I've been lucky to find a shop locally that will allow me to use some of their tools so I can build my floors, while they blast and primer the body.

I've definitely learned a lot during my successive projects. My last project I had the fortune of having a full time body guy help me with it, now I'm pretty much on my own. Here is a link for my last project. New 1957 Project - The 1947 - Present Chevrolet & GMC Truck Message Board Network
After looking at that truck..
The bumper should be a walk in the park for you....
WOW !!! What a super nice truck.. Great job,, And a good eye for the detail as well.... I think your pulling our leg here,,,

If you can do that to the dash,, You can and will pull it off with the bumper,,,
04-21-2013 02:04 PM
renegade6 Tools are one of my big limitations. Being in the Army, I have a weight allowance for how much they will move for me. The 80 gallon compressor that I just purchased is definitely going to add up

I've been lucky to find a shop locally that will allow me to use some of their tools so I can build my floors, while they blast and primer the body.

I've definitely learned a lot during my successive projects. My last project I had the fortune of having a full time body guy help me with it, now I'm pretty much on my own. Here is a link for my last project. New 1957 Project - The 1947 - Present Chevrolet & GMC Truck Message Board Network
04-21-2013 02:02 PM
NEW INTERIORS
Quote:
Originally Posted by renegade6 View Post
BTW, I've already tucked the front bumper and welded the seams on it.

I think I am going to go to the local metal shop and have them take a solid plate, bend the angle in it and then slip roll the edge to match the curve of the bumper.
Looking very good so far.. I try to get the bumper as close to that filler as you can,, Makes it look very nice when it's all done..
04-21-2013 01:59 PM
NEW INTERIORS
Quote:
Originally Posted by 69 widetrack View Post
Thanks Randy, tools make the customizing job easier but, back in the day when this all began some pretty wild customs came out...and many times a wide variety of tools weren't always available to the guy doing the metal work. A lot of the improvisation started by these guys is what got the whole hobby going. Bending sheet metal by hand around a pipe to get the curvature you wanted for that change in the sheet metal on the ride they where building. If you look around, there are all kinds of pipes, straight edges, whatever that you can use to get that custom shape your looking for.

There are tools that I wouldn't want to be without, my blocks and long boards are all made out of aluminum, had them for many years and would be lost without them, my body hammers, dolly's and the list would go on, but when it's custom metal work your doing, it's one off work and whatever you have at your disposal to get the job done is what you often need to get to your end goal.

To the OP, X2 on what Randy said if your your planning on getting your custom made bumper chromed, the better you finish your metal, the less your going to pay your chrome guy for your brushed chrome or whatever plated finish your looking for. If you have welds with a minor pin hole, fill it, if the bumper isn't straight, straighten it, the bumper should look as though there hasn't been any welding done. I'm sure you've heard of show quality chrome and that can get expensive. Often show quality chrome on a bumper means that the entire bumper doesn't have any scratch marks left in it from grinding, front side and even the back side. Re-chromed bumpers for collision replacement are usually finished on a 320 grit or 400 grit wheel before they go through the cleaning, copper and nickle processes to give you your finished product. This is fine for daily drivers and will usually look like an OEM finish. Show quality chrome is finished much finer, depending on the chrome company you use, the metal would be finished in 600 grit, or even finer, front and rear. When done, there will not any visible sand scratches in the finished surface. Very similar to finishing primer on a car before painting, if a car is prepped in 320 grit compared to 600 grit before painting, there is a lot less chance of any sand scratches showing up in the primer finished in 600 grit versus 320 grit. The one major difference in chrome plating is that copper is used as primer for the metal versus a 2K primer for painting.

I hope this helps.

Ray
Mr. Ray your right about the tool's helping you out,, I look back before I had my shop and very little tool's, And can't figure out how I did it.. I guess it was the drive... The right tool's are important... I now have almost every one I need,, With a little thinking and looking around the shop,, You will be surprized at how many things are tool's and you don't know it..You just have to let your mind run wild..
04-21-2013 01:52 PM
NEW INTERIORS
Quote:
Originally Posted by renegade6 View Post
Thanks again to everyone.

The one challenge with this is that there is a bit of art...Something that I'm definitely not is an artist but, I may have to get my son involved

I've heard conflicting things about grinding welds on something that you are going to get chromed. When I finally found a plater who will do the brushed finish, he said not to grind the welds off as they didn't want to have too much material removed.
The bumper shop's will tell you that to get the extra $$ out of you... It's like anything.. You can grind to much or not enough,, You can tell... If your not sure leave some of the weld on the back side,, Just dress it up a little,,, The good thing about metal,, It's not like messing up with wood,,, You mess wood up it's done,,, You mess metal up you just weld it back..

As far as being a artist... Not everyone is born with it,,, But with a little work at it,, You can gain it.... I'm a strong believer that YOU can do anything you set your mind to do,, Are you going to mess up,,Most likely yes,,, But you can do it... ''Set No Limit's On Yourself'' DO IT !!!!

Most of the time you will get it done and look back and think,, That wasn't as bad as I thought,,, Then you are more willing to take the next step,,, That is called DRIVE !!!!

People don't look at grinding as a art,,, But it's no different then doing body work... Don't just start grinding the metal off,,, Watch very close when doing it,,, YOU control the grinder, Not the grinder controling you... It's art as well.. Have faith in your self and get it done... Didn't mean to sound like I was coming down on you,,, Just giving you a push to believe in yourself..
04-21-2013 01:26 PM
69 widetrack It sounds like you have it under control. Trust me, any plating shop is going to grind your bumper, especially the welds...that's how they start. If tour bumper has any minor imperfections they hammer the imperfection out from the back then grind it flush on top...then finish it in the grits I mentioned. They do have stationary grinders that help in getting the bumper straight.

Ray
04-21-2013 01:08 PM
renegade6 BTW, I've already tucked the front bumper and welded the seams on it.

I think I am going to go to the local metal shop and have them take a solid plate, bend the angle in it and then slip roll the edge to match the curve of the bumper.
04-21-2013 01:02 PM
renegade6 Thanks again to everyone.

The one challenge with this is that there is a bit of art...Something that I'm definitely not is an artist but, I may have to get my son involved

I've heard conflicting things about grinding welds on something that you are going to get chromed. When I finally found a plater who will do the brushed finish, he said not to grind the welds off as they didn't want to have too much material removed.
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