Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board - Reply to Topic
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > General Discussion> Hotrodders' Lounge> Want to know how to build your own Locomotive?
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Thread: Want to know how to build your own Locomotive? Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
05-07-2013 10:10 PM
boothboy She is a beauty alright.

BB
05-07-2013 06:17 PM
cliff tate
steam locoes

go to squamish bc and see the Roal hudson,it is awsome and readey to go.I grewup in alogging camp on vancouver island,they had 2 shays (90tons) and 1 climax. these wher gear driven all wheels had power.Also the co had a large shop wher they rebuilt several shays for other operations. we went to school in as speeder held 30 peaople was powered bu a t120 chrysler,looked like a kaboose,the operator sat up in the rased part.interesting time
05-07-2013 04:34 PM
MARTINSR
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave57210 View Post
They are often called "Sand DOMES" and were put on top of the boiler to keep the sand from freezing up in winters. Also made it easier to refill them at the roundhouse/depot
Ahhhhhh, interesting. The ones I saw that day that I talked to my neighbor about were big canisters on each side of the front of the engine. Something like 30 gallon barrels with funnels at the bottom with the hose coming off the funnel. Not so crude as that kinda in that shape.

Brian
05-07-2013 04:32 PM
Dave57210 They are often called "Sand DOMES" and were put on top of the boiler to keep the sand from freezing up in winters. Also made it easier to refill them at the roundhouse/depot
05-07-2013 12:01 PM
MARTINSR
Quote:
Originally Posted by boothboy View Post
Brian was talking about not being able to find pictures of sandboxes or hoppers and I was just reading about Locomotive design when I came across a very interesting tidbit. Classic Locomotive design really started in the 1850's with a man named William Mason. Mason had made his wealth by designing and manufacturing textile machinery. As you could imagine machines that produce and operate around cloth don't have any sharp or rough points on them. Mason developed a eye for smoothing out things. When he decided to get into the emerging train world he wanted to make his engines as clean and beautiful as possible. He drew a lot of his design clue from classic shapes and designs such as Doric, classical Tuscan, and Greek revival. Clean lines and beautiful functionality were his goals. The guy built rolling pieces of artwork, such as the Locomotive that Brian showed us from the California State Train Museum in Sacramento. Old #12, "The Sonoma." Getting back to the sandbox that we couldn't see. Mason thought they ruined the look of his locomotives did the standard way of locating the drive cylinders. Before they were mostly located at the front of the engine in a "V" configuration. Mason developed the horizontal drive cylinder because it looked better. Sand boxes, I didn't forget them, if you look at the dome on top of the boiler that has the #12 on it, that is the sandbox. Form and functionality.
Well I'll be Dam***!

BB
LOL! that's why I couldn't find them, I was looking for function over form! LOLOL

Brian
05-07-2013 11:59 AM
MARTINSR God yes they are art, what beauty. I love the trucks of that time too where they got artsy and aerodynamic.

Brian
05-07-2013 11:31 AM
boothboy Brian was talking about not being able to find pictures of sandboxes or hoppers and I was just reading about Locomotive design when I came across a very interesting tidbit. Classic Locomotive design really started in the 1850's with a man named William Mason. Mason had made his wealth by designing and manufacturing textile machinery. As you could imagine machines that produce and operate around cloth don't have any sharp or rough points on them. Mason developed a eye for smoothing out things. When he decided to get into the emerging train world he wanted to make his engines as clean and beautiful as possible. He drew a lot of his design clue from classic shapes and designs such as Doric, classical Tuscan, and Greek revival. Clean lines and beautiful functionality were his goals. The guy built rolling pieces of artwork, such as the Locomotive that Brian showed us from the California State Train Museum in Sacramento. Old #12, "The Sonoma." Getting back to the sandbox that we couldn't see. Mason thought they ruined the look of his locomotives did the standard way of locating the drive cylinders. Before they were mostly located at the front of the engine in a "V" configuration. Mason developed the horizontal drive cylinder because it looked better. Sand boxes, I didn't forget them, if you look at the dome on top of the boiler that has the #12 on it, that is the sandbox. Form and functionality.
Well I'll be Dam***!

BB
05-07-2013 10:48 AM
boothboy And a couple more.

BB
05-07-2013 10:46 AM
boothboy I really love the transition time between conventional styled locomotives and steam streamliners. !930's and forties. Very much art deco. Of course these beauties pulled passengers. The rolling stock followed suite.
Aren't they wonderful?

BB
05-07-2013 10:19 AM
boothboy Here's a couple of pics of sanders including a different style from Hawaii.


BB
05-07-2013 08:56 AM
RWENUTS And the sand made a huge difference. We had an old Elco where I worked. We used it to load slate sulphur into rail cars, 50 cars in a string. 150 tons per car. We would get stuck in the switches if we weren't carefull. Put a little sand down and off we went.
I watched a hogshead lay down a little sand and push 6000 tons of loaded cars 10 feet down the line. Brakes where all locked. Wheels just skidding. Big power, big traction.
The newer loco's use air to push (actually syphon) sand while the old steam loco's used steam.
05-07-2013 08:30 AM
MARTINSR If any of you guys are ever around the SF bay area up in Berkeley at Tilden Park there is a Steam train, a REAL steam train for the "kids" to ride on. And it doesn't go around in a circle it goes out along the hills overlooking the SF bay. It is a heck of a good little ride and a blast!



Tilden Regional Park

They also have a bunch of tracks there ranging from about 3/4" wide to a foot or so that are used my a steam engine modelers club. It's a sight to see and if you are in the area, why not?

Brian
05-07-2013 08:25 AM
MARTINSR This was one of the things I learned from my neighbor next door, sand! I was up at the Skunk train working and came back home going next door to tell Scotty about this 1932 something (forget the name) engine that was there and mentioned the sand hoppers out front and he explained it all to me. They were used a lot of course where he was working in the snow of the Sierras.

It's weird, I am using the wrong terminology or something but I can't find a photo of one. This engine had big containers with a funnel bottom on them mounted one sides of the front for sand, but I'll be damned if I can find a photo.

Brian
05-07-2013 07:46 AM
RWENUTS Sand! John!!
THey use a little sand sprayed in front of the traction wheels. At least on the new ones and likely on the old too.
05-06-2013 09:56 AM
John long I don't know what it is about a steam engine that is so fascinating. How in the world can those 8 steel wheels on 2 steel tracks have enough traction to pull 100 loaded freight cars up an incline? How can a boiler full of water and some coal produce that kind of raw power?

When I was in the Navy in 1965 I seved on the USS Northampton. She was a cruiser that was 667 feet long. More than 2 football fields. She was powered by 4 steam turbins and could run 37 Knots under full power. That is over 40 mph. Steam power just never ceases to amaze me.

John
This thread has more than 15 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.