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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-28-2013 02:21 PM
white72gs455
Thanks!

Just a note, since I high jacked an old thread after doing a search. I am using gas on my machine and spot welding. I was just looking for some easier ways to get things done and better products to use. I will move forward with what I have... time and patience grasshopper.
05-28-2013 01:59 PM
64SS327 Very interesting. Thanks for the info!

It's surprising all the good products that have gone the way of the dodo bird by either bad marketing or a poorly chosen name.
05-28-2013 01:51 PM
oldred
Quote:
Originally Posted by 64SS327 View Post
I've never heard of the JW Harris 20 ga. welding wire. I'm sure it was nothing special you can't already easily find..


You may have never heard of it bit I assure you it most certainly was special and very different and there are no easily found equivalents! This wire was the cat's meow for body work or other thin metal but the manufacturer did an extremely poor job of marketing it which I think was the main reason for it's demise, that and it was rather pricey which made it unattractive to large manufacturers. They had pretty good web site info at the time but apparently did little or nothing to educate their distributors and I have even seen it lumped in with the flux core wires on the shelf at the welding supply, then there was that confusing and just plain stupid name! The "Twenty Gauge" name referred to Twenty Gauge shotgun (pictured on the label) due to the tiny metal pellets inside the tubular "wire" and had nothing to do with wire size! They failed to point this out and even a lot of dealers thought it had something to do with a 20 ga. wire size, which it did not, and the fact the .030 used even less current and was less likely to burn though than .023 solid wire just sort of got lost. Basically the wire was not promoted enough and was a poor seller due to misunderstanding of the concept and just plain confusion, as far as how well it worked it was fantastic to say the least! Maybe someday someone will realize what they had and it will make it back into the market but if does they need to do a better job of explaining just what the stuff is and how it's to be used, it is different than anything else out there and so far I have not seen anything even close to it.
05-28-2013 01:01 PM
64SS327 I've never heard of the JW Harris 20 ga. welding wire. I'm sure it was nothing special you can't already easily find.

Your best best is to convert the welder to gas if you haven't already done so. Then and only then will you have a welder that can do it's best job.

Welding 20 ga. is very difficult. Why make it harder on yourself than you have too? .030 wire or larger is too big for that light material. You need to be using .023 wire.

Practice on some extra 20 ga. you have laying around. Get your welder set up so it works well for you. You will never be able to do a solid weld on light material without warping. Tack welds are the only way to do. Even then you will probably get some warping. Move around the panel to distribute the heat.

This is where you need to work the metal with a hammer and dolly before all the welding is finished. This will give you the best end results. Practice, practice, practice. Make sure the seams are as tight as you can get them. You will easily have enough penetration even with tack welds. Check this on your practice pieces.

Be careful grinding the panels when you are finished. You can still easily warp a panel after the welding has been completed with too much heat from the grinder. Patience is key along with a lot of practice.
05-28-2013 11:48 AM
white72gs455
Figures...

if it worked as good as some were sayin... that would explain why it went away!
Did/does another product work as well?
05-28-2013 08:12 AM
OneMoreTime The 20 gauge wire had been discontinued and is no longer available..

Sam
05-28-2013 07:47 AM
white72gs455
old thread...

i just noiticed the date on the latest post... Thye may have changed the product since this was posted.
05-28-2013 07:45 AM
white72gs455
Twenty guage part number

Hi there,
Anyone have a part number or a link to the "JW Harris - Twenty guage" wire?
It seems i am struggling to find it on thier web page, if i have the correct page.
01-08-2007 12:04 AM
ChevyTruckGuy
Quote:
Originally Posted by gow589
Thanks Old red.

Oldred I agree
It can be done I welded caps on the stake bed pocks for my sons truck with flux core wire only because I ran out of CO2. I had a couple of burn through spots even being care full. Again if your not welding all the time you will get a little rusty.

Thats what I have in my Garage the Hobart. I have mine on the old work bench. I'm working on building my mobile cart out of 1" tubing. I have the material cut. But still know time to finish it.
I was thinking of buying one but hate to spent the 50-80 bucks for the bolt up ones.


Craig
01-05-2007 11:40 AM
gow589 Thanks Old red.

01-05-2007 10:14 AM
oldred Like Chevy said converting to MIG is about the only real option but some people do this successfully with flux core, it takes quite a bit of experience and even then it does not produce the best weld. On 22 gauge it could be a real problem

If you can possibly convert to MIG I guarantee you will not be sorry as the difference is nothing short of amazing. If you do convert then use the .023 solid wire until you get the hang of it then switch to Twenty Gauge and I think you will find you can weld better than you thought. Doing this conversion is not at all hard nor is it all that expensive to do with that little Lincoln which BTW is a good machine.


Gow589-
01-04-2007 10:52 PM
ChevyTruckGuy
Quote:
Originally Posted by gow589
Mig with gas. I butt welded some fender flairs. They were originally overlapped so I had to cut them as I went. I am pretty good with TIG but a very quick tack weld with TIG warped it enough I could slide a screw driver between the metal on either side. Mig is the way to go where heat is a concern. Take your time. Make couple short tach welds, put it down, come back do it again. Never let it get hot. Take your time you don't need heat sink. It is only something you have to clean off the metal latter. Take your time grinding . You can warp it just as fast gringing. Grind a little, put it down, never bear into it.

No warpage, no need for hammer dolly work when done:









Etch primer no filler, just after it was ground down:



Gary
See this is a guy with a good approach to welding body panels take you time don't get in a rush. no filler thats real cool. Pictures to boot.
You get one heck of a at-a-boy for doing all that welding.

Craig
01-04-2007 10:36 PM
ChevyTruckGuy
Well go down to the welding supply. tig, mig or gas welding is your options.
Conversion kit is you option sorry to say.

Craig
01-04-2007 04:18 PM
aphockey is there anything i can do without converting anything? Is there a wire that will work with my electric welder that will be more friendy to what i am doing? I am soo new to this it isnt even funny i appreciate all of your guys help! Next step is havin one of you guys come show me how it done!

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
First let's point out THERE IS NO SUCH THING as a gas-less MIG, If it is not set up for gas then it is a flux core welder and NOT a MIG (M-etal I-nert G-as). Get a conversion kit for gas and convert that thing to MIG and forget about trying to weld the 22 gauge with flux core wire, after you use MIG wire you will see why. 61 Bone is right the Harris Twenty gauge wire is far Superior to solid MIG wires for something that thin and would be well worth the effort to locate some. The part no. for a 10 # spool is TGE5 and to avoid confusion that Twenty (NOT 20) gauge name is just that, the name of the wire and it does not refer to the size of anything. If you do use solid then go for .023 but the Twenty Gauge .030 will be a lot easier to use and because it is a cored wire it uses even less current in that size as the smaller solid wire.

The Twenty Gauge is a "cored" wire but not a "gas-less" wire and requires the same C25 gas as the solid wire, also the polarity must be switched when using gas on either solid or Twenty Gauge.
01-04-2007 01:11 PM
ChevyTruckGuy
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
First let's point out THERE IS NO SUCH THING as a gas-less MIG, If it is not set up for gas then it is a flux core welder and NOT a MIG (M-etal I-nert G-as). Get a conversion kit for gas and convert that thing to MIG and forget about trying to weld the 22 gauge with flux core wire, after you use MIG wire you will see why. 61 Bone is right the Harris Twenty gauge wire is far Superior to solid MIG wires for something that thin and would be well worth the effort to locate some. The part no. for a 10 # spool is TGE5 and to avoid confusion that Twenty (NOT 20) gauge name is just that, the name of the wire and it does not refer to the size of anything. If you do use solid then go for .023 but the Twenty Gauge .030 will be a lot easier to use and because it is a cored wire it uses even less current in that size as the smaller solid wire.

The Twenty Gauge is a "cored" wire but not a "gas-less" wire and requires the same C25 gas as the solid wire, also the polarity must be switched when using gas on either solid or Twenty Gauge.
LOL. I agree
Hey oldred did we not have are first talk on this one. It funny everyone has lump these to process together. But where it when wrong is you can weld flux core on a mig welder. So its miss used as to what one is really doing. Should not the welding machine say mig and flux core welder not just mig? The term mig is so miss used today.
So for the new people to welding read the posts on welding a lot of good stuff to be learned.
Go to your local welding supply do your home work tell them what you planing on doing they can get you a welding machine to fit you needs. Heck ask us old welder guys before you buy something thats not going to work for ya.

Craig
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