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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-03-2004 02:18 PM
dubie
Quote:
Originally posted by 357ford




DUBIE

What brand welder did you use for the work done in your pictures? What size flux wire? Thanks
I used a cheapo ARCWELD brand welder that I purchased from Canadian Tire for $300. It works very nice as soon as you get the hang of it
05-02-2004 08:21 PM
tresi That welder in question will do for welding auto bodies. Don't expect it to weld 1/8" as advertised. You'll find that exhaust tubing be the most it will handle and that's iffy at that.
05-02-2004 06:14 AM
357ford
Quote:
Go back to the start of this thread, read them all.


Well I hope that isn't directed towards my question, as thats not an answer.


I have followed this thread, all that has been discussed is how mig will produce a cleaner weld over flux core, but with time and patience and a little cleaning the flux will do the trick.

There was mention of using the best welder available to that person, well I think Lincoln is a fairly well known company and have yet to see mention of anyone using the welder I listed in the link above. If anyone happens to have used one then lemme know, it has adjustability and I would like to know how it might last as far as welding time compared to a cheaper unit, like the chicago electric or campbell hausefeld models, while continuous welding time really isn't important to me as I can take it slow, I figured it would point towards the quality of the unit. My price range should be apparant, $100-200. More importantly the link I gave before was for a refurbished Lincoln, I was wondering if anyone by chance may have used one. I have looked into getting a used unit of better quality but nothing has surfaced at the moment. Any thoughts appreciated



DUBIE

What brand welder did you use for the work done in your pictures? What size flux wire? Thanks
05-01-2004 10:12 PM
troy-curt Go back to the start of this thread, read them all.

Troy

__________________
If you don't make mistakes. your not doing anything.

69 ss rs full custom camaro 98 ISCA grandchampion
69 ss rs bb camaro wifes driver
66 Elcamino 350/all dz parts,ac,windows,loaded,my driver
69 ss chevelle bb conv.fresh frame off
26 T sedan street rod
05-01-2004 08:56 PM
357ford While everyone is discussing welders, any thoughts on this one?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...813276725&rd=1



Would be used for sheet metal only and the use of gas/mig really isn't an option, would like to stick with a flux core. Thanks
05-01-2004 07:39 PM
TurboS10 Gotcha, willys. Makes sense.
05-01-2004 08:19 AM
willys36@aol.com
Quote:
Originally posted by TurboS10
True Willys......thought I might be crazy for a minute, but a quick google helped.

http://www.gowelding.com/met/strain.htm

Chris
You are absolutely correct Chris, there are nitrides formed in a weld performed in the presence of air. In fact, this is a useful chemical reaction that is done on purpose to surface harden high stress areas of parts such as crankshaft journals, etc. However, the preponderance of the bad stuff in an arc weld done without shielding is Fe3O4 - nitride is the least of his worries!!
05-01-2004 07:42 AM
troy-curt huh?
05-01-2004 06:07 AM
TurboS10 True Willys......thought I might be crazy for a minute, but a quick google helped.

http://www.gowelding.com/met/strain.htm

Chris
05-01-2004 12:47 AM
willys36@aol.com
Quote:
Originally posted by TurboS10
.... but I think it is iron nitride or something else, not iron oxide(rust) that is generally produced when welding in the pressence of atomosphere.

Chris
Actually there are two main isotopes of iron oxide. Ferrous Oxide, aka hematite or 'rust' - Fe2O3 & Ferric Oxide aka magnetite or black iron oxide- Fe3O4. They are both naturally occurring iron ores and are important to the steel making industry. Magnetite is strongly magnetic in nature, thus its name. They have very different physical properties, none of which are desirable in sheet metal on a car.

Fe2O3 is common rust and as we all know is bad on structural steel. It does have many useful purposes such as a fine abrasive in jeweler's rouge polish, the pigment in rust preventative paint, general color pigment in paint, media on recording tapes and disks, etc.

Fe3O4 is a very stable form of iron oxide and is actually a protective coating for steel because it does not disintegrate into hematite thus will not form rust. Mill scale, gun bluing, the blue/black coating on some drill bits, and your oxidized welds are all forms of this isotope. Unfortunately, its mechanical properties are more akin to a ceramic (it is a primary component in ceramic magnets) than to a ductile metal so although a chemically stable compound, it doesn't have the strength characteristics to make it a good choice for a weld bead.
04-30-2004 11:52 PM
troy-curt Hey 70, you haven't said anything about reading any books on welding. Here is a few tips that might help. Where ever you are going to weld, clean it until it looks like new far enough back that the heat will not burn or discolor anything. Do not use duck tape to hold the pieces together, use small screws, or clamps where you can. Don't weld over an inch at a time, immediately blow with compressed air until you can touch it, put the tip like a 1/2 inch from the weld while blowing, just takes a few seconds. Your bead should not be much bigger than a kitchen match stick, and look kinda layered, done with a sturing motion with the wire, should look like a mud dobbers nest. The smaller the weld the less heat and grinding you will have to do. Some welds you stur and some you don't, you will learn with time and practice. When the welder is welding right it will have a distinctive sound , like a bee buzzing, that is when every thing is right, the metal is clean, the wire speed is right, the heat is right and the gas pressure is right.
There is a lot of good advice in this thread, go back and read them several times. Good Luck

Troy

__________________
If you don't make mistakes. your not doing anything.

69 ss rs full custom camaro 98 ISCA grandchampion
69 ss rs bb camaro wifes driver
66 Elcamino 350/all dz parts,ac,windows,loaded,my driver
69 ss chevelle bb conv.fresh frame off
26 T sedan street rod
04-30-2004 10:57 PM
arch I posted something about renting a welder, but I took it off because it made absoultly no sense in this thread, i guess i mis-read something. Sorry.
04-30-2004 02:29 PM
dubie just thought I would chime in with my 2 cents here. I did all my cab corners, rockers and fender patch panels with flux core. It is very trying and you do require a lot more patience as opposed to using a gas MIG setup.
Here is a pic of my first attempt at flux core. I ended up cutting it off and re-doing it because of the burn thru. But after practicing on some scrap metal. this is what it ended up looking like. The key to welding with flux core is patience. Good luck
04-29-2004 04:00 AM
TurboS10 Ditton with Willys. You would be surprised how many chassis you come across in swap meets that look just like that though. I could be wrong, but I think it is iron nitride or something else, not iron oxide(rust) that is generally produced when welding in the pressence of atomosphere.

Chris
04-28-2004 04:56 PM
70chevy I know this turned into a mig thread but it started as me trying to find out if any of the other systems I already own would work...Hence the name of the thread. But I will confess i didnt search and even as a new ignorant kid i told an older gentleman hey do a search before you post. I guess I am a Board Hipocryte(spelling? Oh well) He isnt doing the welding I am. He is loaning his equipment and the use of his shop for as long as it takes me (1 day probally tops). Plus he is glassing my bed floor!
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