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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-25-2004 09:13 PM
87442lover I'm not too much into painting, but like powder coating, an Epoxy primer, or top coat is the best to use. Can't get any better rust protection than epoxy now can ya?

I also had my Olds SSII wheels powder coated from someplace in manassas 2 years ago and the car has sat for a year since, no rust what so ever and no chips. Especially for wheels, paint just does not work, you need to get them powder coated.
08-24-2004 11:13 PM
Dep ME
Quote:
Originally posted by bullheimer
just my two cents. i love zero-rust. used it on the inside and under my truck cab. my trucks frame i sandblasted the whole thing and covered with industrial red oxide primer then black frame paint. awesome. why bother with anything else anyway? if you are showing it then powdercoat it i guess, or just plain have lots of money. my powdercoater up here will do a whole rack for about $150 tho. anything you can hang on the rack for one price. it just all has to be the same color tho.
if you can sandblast it with a big time sandblaster do so, those little ones really suck bad. i recently pc'd my 41 scout frame parts and it was the biggest mistake i ever made. they look great now but had to be done twice each or more because of hidden hard to get out 60 yr old grease, which heats up and streaks the "paint" and has to be re-blasted and re done. when i worked at a sign company we left long steel poles out in the rain and the rain just beaded up on the red oxide like it was a new car finish. i dont see how you can beat it. easy to grind off to weld, or paint to fix. just dont ask me what brand it was, the painter used what he had laying around.
I have to agree with you 100%. ZR out performs POR15 on rust issues, is a heck of a lot cheaper, is easier to work with, is available in rattle cans, can be resealed for later (months later) use, and for me, has just the right amount of semi-gloss for a frame.
08-24-2004 05:16 PM
bullheimer just my two cents. i love zero-rust. used it on the inside and under my truck cab. my trucks frame i sandblasted the whole thing and covered with industrial red oxide primer then black frame paint. awesome. why bother with anything else anyway? if you are showing it then powdercoat it i guess, or just plain have lots of money. my powdercoater up here will do a whole rack for about $150 tho. anything you can hang on the rack for one price. it just all has to be the same color tho.
if you can sandblast it with a big time sandblaster do so, those little ones really suck bad. i recently pc'd my 41 scout frame parts and it was the biggest mistake i ever made. they look great now but had to be done twice each or more because of hidden hard to get out 60 yr old grease, which heats up and streaks the "paint" and has to be re-blasted and re done. when i worked at a sign company we left long steel poles out in the rain and the rain just beaded up on the red oxide like it was a new car finish. i dont see how you can beat it. easy to grind off to weld, or paint to fix. just dont ask me what brand it was, the painter used what he had laying around.
08-22-2004 08:00 PM
sblake
POR15 or powdercoat

I think powder coat would probably be the way to go. However, I mostly work on motorcycles and like a lot of motorcycle guys I use Varathene Colours in Plastic on frames. It's cheap, sprays easy, looks fantastic and is pretty durable. I know that car frames take more of a beating than bikes, but it might be worth a try.
Simon
08-22-2004 06:50 PM
babe_n_indy
Quote:
Originally posted by willys36@aol.com
I powder coat everything except body sheet metal - frames, suspension, fender wells, engine blocks & heads, clear powder coat all my polished aluminum like tranny cases, valve covers, etc. Impervious to virtually every chemical (including brake fluid, great for master cylinders) except paint stripper which takes it off easily. Infinite color selection including candies, no UV problems, penetrates inside tubulars due to the electrostatic charged powder. And is about as tough as you can get.
In total agreement with Willys. Have used POR-15 on many applications but found that powercoating is much more durable and tough as all get out!
08-22-2004 06:47 PM
81blownz28 my 81 z28's front clip was sand blasted then epoxy painted
semi gloss black last year. it's still looking good
my friend had his import valve cover powder coated
around the same time as me and it looks like crap.

the sand blaster said i could get the clip painted
any color i wanted and it would hold up to all
fluid's and chemicals

my 81 z28's front clip was sand blasted then epoxy painted
semi gloss black last year. it's still looking good
my friend had his import valve cover powder coated
around the same time as me and it looks like crap.

the sand blaster said i could get the clip painted
any color i wanted and it would hold up to all
fluid's and chemicals
08-22-2004 04:58 PM
woodz428 I've used POR15& Rust-Magnet paints and thought they performed pretty well. They do say that it isn't supposed to be used as a top coat because of the UV affects, but it works great as a primer for a topcoat. I have also powdercoated as well. I would go with the powder coating for the best results and less effort on your part. To use any of the rust treatment type paints requires good prep as well as a lot of time to cover it well. Although the cost will be a little higher (remember that those rust treatment paints aren't cheap) the time saved can be used on lots of other areas.
08-22-2004 04:14 PM
Dep ME Just a warning, if you decide on POR15 and spray it, you need to be concerned about isocyanate issues. As you are probably aware, isocyanates aren't to be taken lighty. Guard you lungs.
08-21-2004 11:25 PM
mitmaks on frame id go with powdercoat
08-21-2004 07:14 AM
oldfard About ten years ago I tried POR-15 on my frame. Blasted it and prepped it as per directions. Sprayed it from a gun thinning with inexpensive lacquer thinner. (This was before POR-15 offered their own thinner. At that time they recommended lacquer thinner, but now they recommend their own proprietary thinner for spraying.) Top coated with enamel. And note that you MUST apply the top coat during the POR-15 cure time period or the top coat will eventually peel off as it does not get good adhesion over cured POR-15. The results were excellent and the frame looks as good today as it did when first applied. That said, there were a few problems. First, I ran out of time and could not finish the job the first day. I let some POR paint mixed with thinner sit in the gun overnight and finished spraying the next day. I thought it would be OK but after several days the area which I painted on the second day was still tacky and remains so today. So I would recommend that if you thin the paint then use it immediately of discard it. Second, it is a bear to clean up the spray gun, your hands, and anything else which gets messy, so follow the directions carefully and clean up any spills, your spray gun, your hands, etc., BEFORE the POR-15 cures. Third, it should be emphasized that POR-15 is not something which should be used as a temporary coating on parts which you plan on doing more work on later. You cannot sand it and touch it up as you would in the case where for example you wanted to do some more welding on the part later. It just won't work. For example, one time my car broke down and I had to call a ramp truck. The operator hooked his loading chain onto one of the shock moounting brackets. After he finished unloading and removed the hook, the POR-15 coating was torn. I touched it up but could never blend it in as could be done with a regular paint. I would have liked to try powder coating but the equipment was too expensive at that time. Now I will probably try powder coat on my next frame job as the tools and equipment are now available to do powder coating at home.
08-20-2004 11:55 AM
53LEDSLED i liked the way POR-15 worked out with my frame but then again its my first frame, i never tried enything else, and i its only been a coulple of weeks sence i painted it so i dont know how its gona hold up? but besides that it looks good.
08-18-2004 09:27 AM
sodas38 I'm a fan of POR15. I've used it on 2 frames now and it seemed to work out great. For gosh sakes wear gloves when you paint this stuff on because you'll have to take the skin with you if you get it on your hands, etc. It seems to work best on thicker metals, frames, rear end, brak drums, etc. I did use it on a gas tank however, and it seemed to work out fine, looked nice too. I will be using it on my 38 Chevy when it comes time to paint the frame. Again, I have applied it only with a brush, and I would recommend using a decent brush. I used cheap brushes and I was constantly picking out brush hairs.
08-18-2004 01:18 AM
Dep ME About the only thing I use on frames is Zero Rust. It stops rust dead, is a 1-part paint, available in gallons, quarts, and rattle can. The best part is that it is inexpensive (about $50/gallon). There is so many pluses that I don't even consider POR15 anymore.

It dries to a semi-gloss. For those areas where I want a gloss, I coat it with their Crystal Cote.

Dennis
08-12-2004 09:49 AM
dinger I'm with Willys on this one, I had the frame, crossmembers, almost everything that is bolted to my frame powdercoated. I've dropped tools, parts, banged against, (I'm a klutz sometimes)no chips. There's so many colors available you should be able to find just about any color to match your needs. Dan
08-12-2004 08:04 AM
willys36@aol.com I powder coat everything except body sheet metal - frames, suspension, fender wells, engine blocks & heads, clear powder coat all my polished aluminum like tranny cases, valve covers, etc. Impervious to virtually every chemical (including brake fluid, great for master cylinders) except paint stripper which takes it off easily. Infinite color selection including candies, no UV problems, penetrates inside tubulars due to the electrostatic charged powder. And is about as tough as you can get.
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