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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-20-2005 10:31 AM
xntrik
Quote:
Originally Posted by bentwings
Want to know something sad?? I tossed probably a dozen sets of those dimpled valve covers in the trash back in the old top fuel/gas days. They looked like crap when they were chromed ...back then. We kept a few sets of adjustable rocker arms. You could buy better lighter ones so these were just for emergency. We used to keep the block, heads, crank, and oil pumps (56) and a few cams and a couple plain valve covers that we had chrome plated.. The rest went to the junk yard. We used to be able to get a whole car for $50 tops. We'd get a couple and rip them apart on a week end. Sometimes we got $10 for the remains. 300's were better. It was rumored they had high nickle blocks. Never saw any difference. Imperials sometimes had the dimples as did the truck and marine blocks. We just went shopping and took every thing we could find. If it had 57 or 58 in the serial number it was a 392.
don't you just hate us old guys. haha
Hey we muscle car guys did similar things. None of us ever thought that "it" would end. When we woke up in 78 we had the shock of our lives, didn't we?
Cars we traded off for just a few bucks.. or parts we just threw away..... ah... ebay.

I probably owned the most rare factory built mopar ever... and traded it for a Catalina 400.
11-20-2005 10:13 AM
xntrik
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centerline
Well if you want to be technically correct no he didn't invent it, ..... however I stated that Henry Ford "established" the assembly line and this was correct as far as the automotive industry is concerned, and that was the subject being discussed. There were crude assembly lines that had been implemented in other industries earlier (that's where he got the idea) but when it comes right down to it, Henry Ford is the one credited with "introducing and establishing" the first successful assembly line to the automotive industry........ At least according to all the history books.
Yes and Henry got the idea after touring assembly line factories in Germany. Check it out.

Many of the things Henry did, he got the ideas from somebody else and improved upon them and made them successful.
11-20-2005 10:11 AM
xntrik
Quote:
Originally Posted by 302/Z28
A lot of people think Chrysler invented the hemi head, when in actuality it was the aircraft industry.

Vince
Curtiss-Wright build a water cooled V8 hemi engine for WWI (1917) that was used in many airplanes back then... like the infamous Jenny of WWI. The engine was the Curtiss-Wright OX-5.

(not 23 years old)
x
11-16-2005 11:16 PM
willys36@aol.com That engine must have a very interesting oiling system!
11-16-2005 07:18 PM
Centerline
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Lyon
Reference all the Hemi stuff, the Chrysler folks bolted two specially built Hemis together to use in test model XP-47 late in WW2.They were inverted, end to end. Legend has it there are 3 remaining in museums. Never went into production, Jets were on the way in.
Just for the doubters here's a pic of this inverted V-16 Hemi.

11-16-2005 07:04 PM
willys36@aol.com Nearly won the Indianapolis 500 in '53 too!
11-02-2005 05:53 PM
Don Lyon
Hemi's

Reference all the Hemi stuff, the Chrysler folks bolted two specially built Hemis together to use in test model XP-47 late in WW2.They were inverted, end to end. Legend has it there are 3 remaining in museums. Never went into production, Jets were on the way in.
11-02-2005 05:30 PM
Centerline
Quote:
Originally Posted by farna
You mean like Henry establishing the first assembly line? He PERFECTED the assembly line, he didn't invent/establish it!
Well if you want to be technically correct no he didn't invent it, ..... however I stated that Henry Ford "established" the assembly line and this was correct as far as the automotive industry is concerned, and that was the subject being discussed. There were crude assembly lines that had been implemented in other industries earlier (that's where he got the idea) but when it comes right down to it, Henry Ford is the one credited with "introducing and establishing" the first successful assembly line to the automotive industry........ At least according to all the history books.
11-02-2005 02:26 PM
farna
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centerline
You are so far off...... As has been said earlier European designers were building hemi head internal combustion racing engines as early as 1912, a full year before Henry established the first assembly line.

Next time do yourself a favor and do a little research..... It just might save you from showing a distinct lack of knowledge on whatever subject is being discussed.
You mean like Henry establishing the first assembly line? He PERFECTED the assembly line, he didn't invent/establish it!
11-01-2005 11:39 AM
techinspector1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centerline
You are so far off...... As has been said earlier European designers were building hemi head internal combustion racing engines as early as 1912, a full year before Henry established the first assembly line.

Next time do yourself a favor and do a little research..... It just might save you from showing a distinct lack of knowledge on whatever subject is being discussed.
Yep, I've seen a photo of a 1912 Peugeot hemi.
Silent, I don't know if you ever found the answers as to what makes the hemi such a superior design, but two of the characteristics I remember are...
1. Flame Propogation: with the centrally located spark plug, the flame front has an better chance of travelling to all the areas of the combustion chamber in the available time, giving a more complete burn to the mixture as opposed to a quench design.
2. Surface to volume ratio: it is beneficial to present as little surface area as possible to the burn to prevent as little heat transfer to the cooling system as possible. The hemi design offers a smaller ratio over a quench design.
11-01-2005 09:42 AM
amx82
sorry

Thank's for correcting me on that info ,alway's learnin. that was very interesting any sight's that i could catch to learn more?
10-31-2005 04:16 PM
Centerline
Quote:
Originally Posted by amx82
Actually ford designed the first hemi head ......
You are so far off...... As has been said earlier European designers were building hemi head internal combustion racing engines as early as 1912, a full year before Henry established the first assembly line.

Next time do yourself a favor and do a little research..... It just might save you from showing a distinct lack of knowledge on whatever subject is being discussed.
10-31-2005 03:55 PM
bentwings Just because the cylinders aren't in a row doesn't mean they aren't hemi's. It just a circular row. besides those 2 round rows of nine hemis put a lot of red roundels in the Pacific ocean back a few years ago.

there is nothing like a big round bunch of "hemis" haha
10-31-2005 01:34 PM
amx82
Quote:
Originally Posted by 302/Z28
A lot of people think Chrysler invented the hemi head, when in actuality it was the aircraft industry.

Vince
Actually ford designed the first hemi head ,but like all thing's ford it died the same year it was a 427ci, not to be mistaken for the 427 cobra jet,did i mention that chevy didint even have the cod's to give it a try LOL LOL ,and you really can't call an engine thats round and's kinda like a rotary engine a hemi
06-11-2005 12:02 PM
bentwings
tossed parts

Willys,
Normally I'd be all over ya for trashing original tin on these rare cars, but the Willys at least the 40-41 were probably the sorriest excuse of a car ever made. Replacing a fender was more like installing a custom made piece with original tin. For the most part getting rid of the tin was the best thing that happened to them. Fortunately a few good rodders patched the stuff up and made a few good cars for plugs for todays plastic fantastics. My A&C 41 is nearly perfect right from the box. No flash No mold lines, nothing. It is smooth and ripple free. I put a few nicks and scratches in the body in the garage but that's it. Even the hood to fender and center section fit is not too bad.
Some one told me that the originals didn't last 5 years before they rusted out plus there was poor support for the body so it broke up from the frame twisting and vibrating. There are very very few tin cars left that were not racers at one time. I saw one last year that went for better than 25k unrestored. I bet it would take another 25k just to restore what was left of the body.

So in the end pal, you did all us Willys owners a great favor. haha
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