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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-21-2005 06:00 PM
HUH?
Circuit Breakers

Like the man said, electricity can be tricky and dangerous. The fuse or circuit breaker is in the system to protect your wiring. 12 gauge wire MUST have a 20 amp breaker or fuse to protect it. If you replace that 20 amp fuse with a 30 amp fuse the wire is the weak link in the system. The 12 gauge wire will melt in two and never "kick" the breaker. If you are "lucky" it will melt quickly. If you are not lucky it will melt slowly and be a long, red hot heating element behind your shop walls prompting a visit from your local fire department.

Flickering lights can be caused by a malfunctioning power tool or a loose connection somewhere between the outlet and the power line outside. It can take a pretty sharp electrician to hunt down that single loose screw.


I reject your reality and substitute my own.
12-14-2005 04:13 AM
schnitz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Keller
shcnitz

You might need to check the breaker on that service.

I had a 20 AMP running to my tool box and when the compressor kicked on the fluorescents would go out and flicker back on so I replaced it with 30 amp and the compressor kicks on and ups and runs faster and the lights dont go out.

If you dont know about AC current get some one who dose its tricky and can mess you up real fast

SR66

I tried it in 2 different outlets on 2 separate circuits in the house too, Same thing. Also, the grinder made it do the same. Guess I'm hiring an electrician shortly. Get it, electrician- shortly?? Ah ha.

Thanks Rob.
In a while, Chet.
12-13-2005 07:05 PM
Rob Keller shcnitz

You might need to check the breaker on that service.

I had a 20 AMP running to my tool box and when the compressor kicked on the fluorescents would go out and flicker back on so I replaced it with 30 amp and the compressor kicks on and ups and runs faster and the lights dont go out.

If you dont know about AC current get some one who dose its tricky and can mess you up real fast

SR66
12-11-2005 06:44 PM
sha_ba_do_bang I bought this makita corded drill from a pawnshop for $15, it looked pretty beat up but i definatly beat it up more, i have drilled many holes in metal and its gotten pretty hot and dropped alot and still runs great, Good tools can't be beat
12-10-2005 08:59 PM
schnitz Rob, both the regular rough service garage bulbs and the florescent dim slightly when I run the drill. I've pushed it hard enough to let it get warm, but let it cool for a bit, and then it's good as a new one. Tuff little bugger I guess.



In a while, Chet.
12-10-2005 07:59 PM
Rob Keller florescent or regular bulbs?
its not abnormal for them to dim a little when you turn them on

when they start getting hot, smoking or making noise then they are possibly on their way out as far as some stuff I have a 4' grinder from HF that I use for everything the switch started sticking a little but I have a diamond blade I use for tile that is $30. twice as much as the grinder LOL
been going strong for 8 years

SR66
__________________
I'm not prejudice, I hate everyone
12-10-2005 07:34 PM
schnitz Well, I keep my grinder and one of my drills in separate Plano tool boxes. Everything I need with it is kept right with the tool. Sure saves on looking for the wrench for the grinder.

I try to buy hte best tool that I can afford at the time of purchase. My grinder in a Makita 4 1/2" that I bought about 10 years ago, and my DeWalt drill is about the same age. I've just been noticing that the lights flicker slightly in the garage when I run the drill. It hasn't run really hot or anything, but I figured I missed something in terms of upkeep.


Thanks, Chet.
12-10-2005 07:16 PM
Rob Keller you've hit most of the area's of concern

you can take a piece of 5/16 or 3/8 fuel line and put it around the cord to keep it from getting nicked at least at the ends
SR66
__________________
I'm not prejudice, I hate everyone
keep them clean and put up when not in use

when I buy a new drill or impact something that has parts that will rust is 1 ST think is to degrease that part of it and scuff it up w/ some scotchbrite and tape it off and paint if I use Yellow or clears the yellow works on 2 levels keeps the oxidation out and you know its mine

always lube air tools at the beginning and end of use sometimes in between

make a place for them so they get proper storage (so there not in a big box or bag at the bottom getting knocked around


hope this helps
SR66
__________________
I'm not prejudice, I hate everyone
12-10-2005 06:36 PM
Jeff@JWP Ummm... First step is to buy good tools

Seriously, the el cheapo stuff is not the way to go... you dfinately get what you pay for.

I second the storage in the cabinet and not wraping the cord very tight.
12-10-2005 04:50 PM
advanced design We have corded tools in the shop that I was using as a child. All we've done is to keep them in drawers and not wrap the cord too tight around the body. Of course those old tools are heavy. The newer grinders and drills receive the same and they are holding up OK.
12-10-2005 04:28 PM
schnitz
Corded tool care.

Is there anything to do to increase the lifespan of corded power tools? I mean, aside from seldomly using them. I try to keep the dust blown out from the vents, and I very seldom have dropped any of them. Air tools require a maintence regiment to make them perform as intended. Is there anything I can do to make my drills and my grinder last longer? I really am not looking forward to spending extra $$ to replace something that regular maintenance could've prevented.

Thanks in advance, Chet.

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