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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-12-2013 11:47 AM
70Caprician Ugh, one-wire is NOT the way to go, unless you're too lazy to hook up 2 extra wires. It's a question of doing it easy, or doing it right.

Read Mark Hamilton at MadElectrical.com. He'll set you straight...
03-12-2013 08:16 AM
Bonneville462 I use the three wire but I like to put the radio on and play around with my car... I like being able to adjust the voltage for optimal (13.5-14 volts) points (distributor) performance..

I never tried a one wire but have heard many good things about them... If you don't like to adjust things, the one wire might be the best way to go..
03-11-2013 09:01 PM
ljtaylorjr@yahoo.com three wire
02-23-2013 05:27 AM
EOD Guy The one wire works very well at, higher than idle rpms, but i haven't had good luck with them and don't use them.

The way I understand it.......With the 1 wire, terminal 1, exciter wire, is connected to the lg lug on the back of the alt (battery feed) either internally or externally depending on the model........at low rpm the sense wire, terminal 2, isn't picking up much of a demand on the elec system therefore the alt isn't producing much juice and terminal 1 isn't getting very excited, as the rpms increase, terminal 1 gets more juice and more excited and sends a strong sig to the alt and the alt produces more juice etc.......

with a three wire the sense wire is tied in well away from the alt and takes advantage of the long wire run to get a truer sense for the demands on the elec system and that kinda buffers how much juice the alt produces

IMO if the one wire was better than a three, it would be cheaper to install, that being said, GM would have done it long ago.
02-22-2013 09:14 PM
HSDropout I am confused again now.....seems opinions vary in favor of 1 wire vs. 3 wire depending on who you talk to and what you read.
Guess I will study the subject some more.........(electrical is not my strong suit)
02-22-2013 08:37 PM
EOD Guy I'd def... go with the three wire then.
02-21-2013 11:11 PM
HSDropout Thanks EOD Guy. The 350 is actually going transplanted into a 1959 hot rod pickup so thinking of going with a Tuff Stuff 7127NF from Summit at this point.........sounds like maybe the simplest option at reasonable price.
Trying to keep it simple as possible.
02-21-2013 10:57 PM
EOD Guy You are correct .... ext regulator. It should be about 3" sq box mounted on your radiator core support, normally on the drivers side. It is super simple to convert to an internally reg alt.
02-21-2013 10:38 AM
HSDropout
Internal or External Regulator

I need to replace my alternator off a '69 350 SBC. Looking at the back, I highlighted the labels, post for battery on far left and ground on far right there is also a plug in center that is labeled "R" on the left and "P" on the right. see photo.
Should I assume this is not internally regulated and the "R" needs to connect to an external regulator? What does the "P" connect to?
I would prefer a 3 wire with internal regulator......but thinking that is not what I have. Any help is appreciated..........
01-14-2006 11:12 PM
bullheimer i'm sure soldering is better, but if you have a racheting crimping tool, (and maybe even if you don't, as long as you do a pull test) you have nothing to worry about with crimp-on connectors. ignition man, you aint goin nowhere....
somebody ought to mention using a resistor wire or a radio shack 10 watt 10 ohm resistor or you'll do like me and blow every light bulb in your car (or truck in my case)
01-14-2006 07:57 PM
docvette Doc here,

If you go with the 3 Wire (more preferred) Here is a diagram for that, you say it's 3 wire now, but as I understand it you will be going to a new engine harness, with options..

This is 3 wire internal:



Simple and easy to hook up, Run one 10 gauge red wire from the main (large lug) Bolt on the Alternator to the area of the starter solenoid battery main bolt.

On that wire, Install a properly gauged fuse link . If your new Alternator is 80 amps go 85 or 90 on the link.Hook it to the main battery terminal on the starter solenoid.

The second wire, will be a red 12 to 14 gauge wire to any voltage source, switched (I find is better) but "Hot at all times" is how the factory did it..Either way is fine!

Next run an 18 Gauge Brown/White wire from the #2 terminal, to the "Hot in Run" Side of the ignition.

If you have a Charge light, Run an 18 Gauge Brown to one side of the indicator, Exit that with a Pink 18 gauge wire into a fuse/Fuse holder, into a pink/black 18 gauge wire to the "Hot in Run" side of the ignition.

Unless you have an 81 Alternator, disregard the 3 rd red wire, not used.

INSTALLING CONNECTORS THAT WILL LAST:

Do NOT just use Crimp on Connectors, Use a proper size uninsulated ring and, IF needed , uninsulated, Solder-able Butt splices.

To do the job right, Strip the wire to the proper length, about 1/8 on an inch extending out the terminal, no bare wire to the rear. Tin the wire with 50/50 solder. Then slide 2 each, about 2 inch heat shrink tubing over the wire and go to the terminal.

Next tin the Terminal wire "Barrel" (where the wire goes through) until good and smooth and shiny. Then slide your wire into the ring, make sure you have no uninsulated wire hanging out the back.. AND no wire into the ring hole, trim if needed!
Crimp it firmly. Next, solder it, adding a small amount of solder as you heat it, until you get a smooth shiny connection..

(Grayish or dull is a cold joint, reheat, and add a tiny bit of solder until you get the above results.)

Let it cool, then slide the first piece of shrink tubing over the ring and wire, hold or prop the wire STRAIGHT and shrink with a heat gun.

(If you have like for days..a hot hair dryer will work, but take tons of time..Don't use a lighter, or solder gun..this just melts the tubing and possibly the wire below it.)

Next, slide the second piece of tubing over the first, but offset it by about a 1/4 of an inch, holding it straight out (if it won't stand straight on it's own by now ) Shrink it down also. Let it all Cool down, and move on!

This will not only provide insulation at the terminal, but some amount of wire strain relief, and It looks REAL pro done if you do it right. BE SURE to make your tubing end cuts straight..(HINT: use a paper cutter, with an adjustable fence.)

On the Butt Splices (If you must use them) Use a proper gauged splice, Metallic, (no insulation) Look at the splice, you will note an inspection hole that goes to both sides of the splice..

Strip, prep, and tin your wire as you would for ring terminals.

Slide your wire into the splice end (trim if needed so some insulation fits in there) Crimp the one side. Do the same on the other, but before you commit yourself, slide two lengths of shrink tubing over the wire, the first to be about 1/8 inch longer than the whole splice, the next slightly longer, about a 1/2 inch..

Crimp, then find the inspection hole, using a vise or something to hold the wire, Heat the Metal Splice and feed a small amount of solder in the inspection hole..continue to do so until it has filled it in.

Then Slide the LONGER shrink tubing over it and shrink it down, Next slide the shorter one over that and shrink down. This will give you good insulation, and anti chafe, Plus with the inset ends looks again real pro done!

Use this method For all smaller gauge wires (10 Gauge and down) and you will have a system that will last forever, and look good while doing it!

Larger gauge wires (Battery Cable, Frame to body cables, ground cables) Require a Nicopress to install the crimp ends..Don't solder them It will just heat and drip out the ends..Don't try crushing them in a vise..usually the first time it is stressed the wire will just pull out..

If you don't have one ( and I suspect you don't) Have the hardware store, Electric supply, or an electrician install them, they will have the tool.

Everything you never wanted to know about harness Building 101..

Hope it helps, gives you some direction, and hopefully apply it to your new harness install as well..

Doc
01-14-2006 02:44 PM
aztek_warrior I would suggest go with the 3 wire alternator,
i just found a kit from Year One that takes
the guess work out of it.........here it is.

http://www.nextgenparts.com/serverfi...ain2.asp?cat=9

Then type Part #HU30

Hope this helps everyone who wants to change,
their generator to an alternator and is limited on
their ability, is all just plug and play for the most part...
01-06-2006 07:55 PM
docvette
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldguy829
Great information. How about going a step farther. There are 100 amp, chrome, 3 wire alternators on ebay for around $75.00. they are listed as "GM" not Delco.Is this a desirable piece, or junk? how can I tell? .
You can get rebuilds (NOT GM) from the parts store for like $20 to $60 bucks..and not take a chance, will it work, will it arrive? and if not, can just go back and get a replacement..over the counter..


Quote:
Fatrodder also lists a 21 circuit (more than I need) wiring harness for around $120.00. Is there a big difference between the quality of this system and a "name" brand? or is the "ease of installation/tech support" the difference?

Will I need to also purchase the terminal blocks/relays/fusible links etc. recommended in the articles no matter which harness I buy?
There is a Thread on this forum, titled " Wiring harness, which do you prefer?" Has about 300 replays on it, about the pros and cons of different harness kits..I suggest you go there and read the information first hand from those that have used them..Ron Francis (owner of Ron Francis harness's ) and the owner of EZ 2 install are both on that thread too answering any TECH questions you may have..

Quote:
I feel capable of following instructions and wiring the car, but maybe not up to adding relays and terminals blocks in the right places, or upgrading the wiring size for a backseat battery mount, without some very specific instructions. What would you recommend for the prolific do it yourselfer, with limited electrcial expertise.
Most of those harness come with very easy to use Instruction manuals, some more involved than others (this is where that other thread will be helpful in deciding) Actually if you have rudimentary Wire skills, you SHOULD be able to do the job no problem! (Solder, strip, read and follow a schematic, wire color coding , wire gauging) I always suggest go to the car with the instructions and read, and read until you can do it in your sleep before you start..know where everything is supposed to be..and if you get stuck..were all here to help if we can!

Doc
01-06-2006 01:09 PM
malc MAD relays, rear batt. mount etc. come with full instructions.
01-06-2006 11:08 AM
oldguy829
1 or 3 wire alternator

Great information. How about going a step farther. There are 100 amp, chrome, 3 wire alternators on ebay for around $75.00. they are listed as "GM" not Delco. Is this a desirable piece, or junk? how can I tell?
Fatrodder also lists a 21 circuit (more than I need) wiring harness for around $120.00. Is there a big difference between the quality of this system and a "name" brand? or is the "ease of installation/tech support" the difference?
Will I need to also purchase the terminal blocks/relays/fusible links etc. recommended in the articles no matter which harness I buy?
MADD electrical looks like a quality outfit, but what I saw were components, which would require me to design my own harness and order the parts. Over my head I'm afraid. I feel capable of following instructions and wiring the car, but maybe not up to adding relays and terminals blocks in the right places, or upgrading the wiring size for a backseat battery mount, without some very specific instructions. What would you recommend for the prolific do it yourselfer, with limited electrcial expertise.
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