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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-20-2007 07:59 PM
horvath LOL! Forgive me.


Adjusting the thread tensions was one of my first "lessons" too, Mark. And, like they tell you in the Auto Interiors books, one of the first things we need to learn is to adjust the thread tensions every time we use different materials.
03-20-2007 07:10 PM
Dusty82
Quote:
Originally Posted by horvath
Practice ... certainly ... but I'll never know what "slipping the clutch" is all about.

I have a servo motor!
Pardon me, Sir - this is the non-gloating section...

03-20-2007 07:08 PM
Dusty82
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
What I didn't say, but should have, was that he needed to get more practice running the machine and easing into the speed of the motor.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horvath
Certainly, getting familiar with the machine by sewing some real simple projects, like I did with the boots, is what is necessary.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimmer2
I agree but the bottom line is practice and learning how to slip the clutch.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArmySniper
I think we can all agree on that!
You'll not get an argument out of me! Man do I ever need to practice!

I got a bit cocky yesterday, and tried to sew together my sewing machine cover. Well, I did realize that I had to readjust my tensions when I threaded up the machine with the thread I was going to use. What I didn't realize was that it was going to take all flippin afternoon to finally get things dialed in right! I had my top thread getting tangled in the bobbin and things like that. Needless to say, by the time I got everything adjusted, it was time for dinner, and I didn't get the cover made. Remember - I'm flying blind here. I've never done anything like this before. Anyway, now it's all set and ready to make the cover - next weekend.

That wing nut adjustment worked a treat! It is a lot easier to control now, but I am going to go look for a smaller pulley so I don't screw up my clutch - thanks for that info Dan!
03-20-2007 06:19 PM
horvath Practice ... certainly ... but I'll never know what "slipping the clutch" is all about.

I have a servo motor!
03-20-2007 08:36 AM
armysniper
Quote:
Originally Posted by trimmer2
I agree but the bottom line is practice and learning how to slip the clutch.When I try to show some one I tell them to wiggle their ankle up and down till the clutch just grabs till they get the feel.

I think we can all agree on that!
03-20-2007 06:43 AM
trimmer2 I agree but the bottom line is practice and learning how to slip the clutch.When I try to show some one I tell them to wiggle their ankle up and down till the clutch just grabs till they get the feel.
03-19-2007 10:56 PM
horvath Certainly, getting familiar with the machine by sewing some real simple projects, like I did with the boots, is what is necessary. The little bit of sewing I've done has made a huge difference for me ... I'm gaining confidence; learning where to keep my eyes fixed (on the foot and the seam, not the needle) and I'm beginning to sew steadier; learning how to steer the material.

Another trick for beginners, I think, is to sew in short bursts.

That small pulley sure helped me out with going at a slower pace. I imagine, at some point, I may want to put the larger pulley back on again, like Dan says.
03-19-2007 08:33 PM
DanTwoLakes Yes, you are absolutely right, the treadle just engages the clutch motor. But.....there are several adjustments that can help the whole process. That's why I told Dusty if adjusting the the treadle doesn't help him enough, he needed to slow the whole process down. Doing this will help gain some control. I did say that once he was more familiar with the machine, he could change the pulleys back. What I didn't say, but should have, was that he needed to get more practice running the machine and easing into the speed of the motor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trimmer2
The treadle on a machine with a clutch motor is not a speed control.It just engages the clutch or disengages it.So its either going or not.You control the speed of the machine by slipping the clutch with your foot. You can slow the whole machine down by changing the pulley but then to go really slow you still have to slip the clutch.
03-19-2007 07:39 PM
armysniper
Quote:
Originally Posted by trimmer2
The treadle on a machine with a clutch motor is not a speed control.It just engages the clutch or disengages it.So its either going or not.You control the speed of the machine by slipping the clutch with your foot. You can slow the whole machine down by changing the pulley but then to go really slow you still have to slip the clutch.
The spring is there to adjust treadle tension. So by adjusting it you gain some control. It's easier for a newbie to ease into clutch engagement then to have a direct connect.

Sometimes it's worth trying to work with what you have before swapping parts. Well, that's my method anyway.
03-19-2007 05:20 PM
trimmer2 The treadle on a machine with a clutch motor is not a speed control.It just engages the clutch or disengages it.So its either going or not.You control the speed of the machine by slipping the clutch with your foot. You can slow the whole machine down by changing the pulley but then to go really slow you still have to slip the clutch.
03-19-2007 01:47 PM
DanTwoLakes Marktoobytheway: If after you adjust the spring with the wingnut on the end you still feel it's too fast, go down to a 2 1/4" or 2 1/2" diameter pulley. That will reduce the top end and all speeds thoughout the speed range by about 1/3rd. If you go with the 2 1/4" pulley, you need a belt that is exactly 2" longer.
03-19-2007 09:59 AM
Dusty82
Quote:
Originally Posted by armysniper
Dusty one thing that might help with the control issue is this.
At the top of the treadle bar, up near the motor, there should be a wingnut that pre-loads a spring. If you loosen that spring the motor should engage with less sensitivity, and more control.

I don't know if all machines have that, but the few I have owned do and should help you out.
Thanks Mark! I'm Mark too by the way.

I went out to the garage about 10 minutes ago and found the spring and wing nut you described, and I loosened it up a bit. That did increase the treadle travel quite a bit. I haven't tried sewing with it yet - still a bit too cold out there. I cut out the pieces to make my machine cover this morning, and as soon as it warms up a bit (supposed to be in the high 70's again today - woohoo!) I'm going to sew it together. Of course I'll report back on how the adjustment worked, and post a pic of the finished cover.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
What are the diameters of the pulley on the machine and the pulley on the clutch motor? If the pulley on the clutch motor is as big, or bigger, than the pulley on the machine, it would be very hard for you to control the speed. The speed of the motor should be 1725 RPM, is that what it says on the label?
While I was outside this morning, I measured the pulleys and checked out the motor. Yep, it's 1725 RPM, and the pulley on the motor has a 3 1/2" diameter. The pulley on the machine has a 3 1/4" diameter. So basically I need to go with a smaller pulley on the motor? What size would you recommend?

As I said in my reply to Sniper above, I adjusted the spring on the actuator arm a few minutes ago and that did increase the pedal travel some. The guy I got this from had it tightened down so that the spring was compressed about half way. I backed it off about half that distance, and I'm going to try it, then adjust it from there. Then I'm going to make my machine cover.

Again, you guys are the best. Thanks for all of your help.
03-18-2007 08:20 PM
horvath It makes total sense, Mark. That's exactly how I did my french seams this week, on my first set of projects (boots) ... only I kept my zipper foot a little less than 1/16th-inch to the right of the seam.

I have a servo motor on my Tacsew ... that spring you mention is there but I couldn't see any way of adjusting it.
03-18-2007 05:50 PM
armysniper Dusty one thing that might help with the control issue is this.
At the top of the treadle bar, up near the motor, there should be a wingnut that pre-loads a spring. If you loosen that spring the motor should engage with less sensitivity, and more control.

I don't know if all machines have that, but the few I have owned do and should help you out.

Also, to get uniform widths and stitches, use the foot as a guide. WHat do you mean mark? Well, since you asked, when doing a wide frech seam, (seen on most american and late model cars) I place the inside of hte foot right on the seam. And keep it there as you sew. On narrower ones (seen in higher end cars) I move the seam to the outside of the inner foot and keep it there. it's only about an 1/8th in. difference but the visual is huge.

Hope the makes sense.
03-18-2007 02:22 PM
horvath Correction: When I said "I don't understand what you guys are talking about," I was referring to what fordSR and Dan were discussing:
Quote:
Quote:
fordSR:
I do use a guide attached to the bed of my machine for a uniform width. The carpet edge of course, must be trimed straight. I have several binders, some that I made and some that I bought from CutSewService. I use brass shim stock about .040 thick for any attachments that I make. This is easy to form and can be soldered to a heavier brass plate where it screws to the bed. I'm sure you could make a carpet binder to suit your needs.
Quote:
Dan:
Do you solder or braize the shim stock, or is braizing too much for the brass to handle?
I'd love to see some pictures of these jigs!
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