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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-25-2007 09:11 PM
creativeinteriors Yep it is a close copy Dan, the Mitz 410 is a close knock off with the exception of the feet being a little longer. Most people swap them but they are a little different.

Welting alot of time exaggerates needle issues even with the right feet.


I tend to agree that if you are a newer sewer or dont want to do some of the other types of bed set ups. The investment of 60 bucks worth of feet, a first sew and a second sew set, tend to be well worth it for the hassles. Just my two cents though.
07-25-2007 08:24 PM
DanTwoLakes His machine is a copy of the Singer 111W, which is the same set-up with the same feet as my Consew machines, and they take a 135x17 needle. Creative is totally right, the wrong needle, loose needle, poorly installed needle, or twisted needle is something else that could also cause the fraying and cutting. His main problem with sewing welting was not using a welt foot or something set up to act like a welt foot.
07-25-2007 07:39 PM
creativeinteriors Sorry to come late to the party, I read most of them but ran short of time.

Heres is what experiance with 1000's of machines in assembly plants has told me. Many sewers on the shop floors call mechanics over the same thing.

Number one cause of cutting or fraying thread in an industrial machine is Needle installed in wrong orientation and wrong length. Are you sure you have the right needle lenght and it is square to the bobbin case and facing the right way? It only takes a few degrees of turn to do exactly what you are saying. Or not fully nested into the needle bar.

Also make sure you didnt put bobbin in backwards. Bobbin should wind out counter clock wise. The fact that the issue just arose makes me fairly certain the needle wasnt tight and moved when welting. And the boobin comments make me think you replaced a bobbin backwards by accident. Let me know if it helped.
07-22-2007 02:22 PM
DanTwoLakes In a PM to me, Stitcheroo explained his set-up for sewing welts and everything else to me. He has a right handed zipper foot that has the part of the foot the needle goes down through ground off to let the needle get closer to the welt cord. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this set-up and it would work fine. This set-up would be more beneficial to an experienced sewer. I thought he was advocating modifying a presser foot, which would have been bad advice, but that was not the case. So......Stitcheroo, I owe you an apology. Sometimes I find evil where there is none, and this is one of those cases. I'm sorry.

Dan
07-22-2007 08:14 AM
DanTwoLakes Stitcheroo: My idea of help is to go into the details of tried and true methods based on 34 years of experience as a professional upholsterer, and explain them the best I can to guys who ask for help. If someone else explains something correctly I leave it at that. If I do something that is a personal preference I tell people that and also tell them other methods or materials that can be used, not insist that my point of view is the only way to do something.
My point is, and always was, you are telling everyone not to use feet specifically designed for specific purposes, when everyone else on the planet doesn't do it that way. I'm sorry you don't like me or my opinion, and I admit I have little patience with people who post things that don't make any sense to me, which comes with being a bitter old man.
One of the problems of this, or any other bulletin board is that a lot of information is passed off as gospel and used by people who screw up something or make their jobs harder because of it. I was trying to point that out without swearing at you or calling you names or belittling you. I guess I don't deserve the same consideration from you. If you thought I was being intentionally rude to you, and I have offended you, I apologize.
07-21-2007 11:52 PM
stitcheroo
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
No, you haven't cleared up my confusion. I have to admit,you have me baffled. How does a "ground down" (your words) foot of any kind beat a presser foot, which is specifically made to sew flat seams, or a welt foot which is specifically made to sew welts? So if I understand you correctly, you use a modified zipper foot to sew both flat seams and welts, as opposed to feet that are designed to do those jobs? A zipper foot walks to the left side of the needle, which would put it directly on top of the welt cord. Are you saying that your modifications of a zipper foot are better than feet that are specifically designed to do certain jobs? Then what do you use to sew zippers? How about taking a picture of the modified foot so we can all take a look at it? From what I can tell, you have a lousy zipper foot acting as a lousy presser foot and a lousy welt foot?? Am I understanding you correctly? How do you sew anything correctly that way?
What the hell is wrong with you? Are you always so rude? Not only are you rude as hell, but you come off as some know it all whose idea of help is being ****ty to people. I've read your condescending comments to other posts where people are just asking for a little advice and instead they are belittled. If you want to be the top dog in the forum, the title is all yours because I couldn't care less, but you don't need to be an ******* to people. Here's some free advice, don't participate in a thread if your just going to go on a superiority rant and be mean to people for not knowing what you do. From what I can tell, you are some bitter old man with a lousy attitude and lousy people skills and should probably quit your lousy job and opt for a career change. Hell with these qualifications you would fit right in at the DMV or a security guard at the mall. As for my post, just forget it, I've had enough of your snotty tone. Am I understanding you correctly?
07-21-2007 09:59 PM
tobyjuarez I bought a used machine years ago and it had "homemade feet" on it that got tossed soon after. The guy basically cut the left toe off the presser foot and then ground the side of the needle foot down almost to the needle so that he could sew right against the piping. It worked good enough if you didnt have a welt foot. But still not tight enough.
07-21-2007 08:41 PM
DanTwoLakes No, you haven't cleared up my confusion. I have to admit,you have me baffled. How does a "ground down" (your words) foot of any kind beat a presser foot, which is specifically made to sew flat seams, or a welt foot which is specifically made to sew welts? So if I understand you correctly, you use a modified zipper foot to sew both flat seams and welts, as opposed to feet that are designed to do those jobs? A zipper foot walks to the left side of the needle, which would put it directly on top of the welt cord. Are you saying that your modifications of a zipper foot are better than feet that are specifically designed to do certain jobs? Then what do you use to sew zippers? How about taking a picture of the modified foot so we can all take a look at it? From what I can tell, you have a lousy zipper foot acting as a lousy presser foot and a lousy welt foot?? Am I understanding you correctly? How do you sew anything correctly that way?
07-21-2007 12:33 AM
stitcheroo
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
Stitcheroo: The sewing machine can't possibly sew correctly using a presser foot to sew welts, unless you make major modifications to the foot, and then it becomes a lousy welt foot and a lousy presser foot. There are two types of welt feet. One type has the back left corner cut out of it to make tighter corners. The foot on the left is like that, and I bought it that way. Yes, every upholsterer has run over a welt and ruined a project, which is no big deal if it's fabric or vinyl. If it's leather,ultraleather,ultrasuede, or suede, it is a big deal. Why invite trouble? My welt feet almost never come off my machines, and every sewing room with commercial sewing machines in it that sews welts is the same way.
I think we're talking about two different things here. I agree, a standard presser foot wont work, however if the presser foot is a zipper foot it will. Hopefully this clears up any confusion.
07-21-2007 12:14 AM
tobyjuarez I have that same machine and have had the same problem with thread unraveling at the needle. Also, the school I attended years ago had the same machines, and for some reason we could only use "Coats America" thread without having any unraveling problems...like said before, probably had something to do with direction that the thread was wound.
R
07-20-2007 02:11 AM
DanTwoLakes Stitcheroo: The sewing machine can't possibly sew correctly using a presser foot to sew welts, unless you make major modifications to the foot, and then it becomes a lousy welt foot and a lousy presser foot. There are two types of welt feet. One type has the back left corner cut out of it to make tighter corners. The foot on the left is like that, and I bought it that way. Yes, every upholsterer has run over a welt and ruined a project, which is no big deal if it's fabric or vinyl. If it's leather,ultraleather,ultrasuede, or suede, it is a big deal. Why invite trouble? My welt feet almost never come off my machines, and every sewing room with commercial sewing machines in it that sews welts is the same way.
07-19-2007 10:08 PM
Barry.M G'day Sticheroo (Ron),

Thanks for your thoughts. I've been a bit busy of late so I haven't progressed anymore than my last update. I did check the timing, but didn't adjust anything as all was well.

The thread shredding problem has also disappeared as previously indicated. Thanks again to everybody who have helped out with their comments.

On the unrelated issue of Guns in Australia if you want a rundown on the situation here send me a private message with your e-mail addy and I'll respond. In a nutshell Semi-Auto's are banned (1997) but everything else is OK.......for the time being.

Cheers.........Barry.
07-19-2007 09:44 PM
stitcheroo Barry, I'm basically going to say what has already been said with a few exceptions. The first being, a welt foot is personal preference. I hate them. In 25 years of upholstery I have never used one other than to try one out for a few days. I hated it the first time I tried to sew a tight corner. I can get the welt tighter with a ground down walking foot and don't ever have to change the foot, but I also run the risk of running over the welt much easier, but like anything else practice helps. Every upholsterer at one time or another has run over the welt and ruined all or part of their project. However, since you've stated that you are a beginner it's probably not a bad idea to use a welt foot until you get a feel for it. I agree with Dan on Taylor's book, it tends to very non-descriptive. Even when you know what they are doing the descriptions don't make much sense. The book is good for pictures and ideas, but lacking in the description. Most books show a nice finished project but neglect to tell the reader the small things that make a huge difference in how the project turns out. As for adjusting your timing....DON'T. If you think you have problems now, just wait until your machine starts skipping stitches or knocking itself out of time because the timing is out of whack. Timing is not your problem. Thread problems are nothing compared to timing dilemmas. From my experience, shredding thread comes from a burr on the tip of the needle, crappy weak thread, a burr on the thread hook, or a groove where the thread has worn on the thread tensioner...in that order. I'm glad you're attempting to sew your project yourself, hang in there, you'll figure it out. You got a good deal on your machine and as long as you keep it oiled it will out live us all. If you need help with your projects, just ask. This is off topic, but you mentioned being a gunsmith, I thought your government stripped the citizens of their right to own guns.?. Take care,

--Ron
07-15-2007 03:04 PM
Barry.M G'day all,

The welt foot hasn't arrived as yet so it will probably come Monday. Didn't have much time over the weekend to try much with the machine in any case as I've been busy with rebuilding the motor for the F350 project. I reassembled the polished foot checked the timing and all is well. I did some practice flat seems on scrap vinyl. Readjusted some tensions and all is well........so far. No problems with threads breaking or unravelling.

So it appears that the problem has gone. My inexperience with the machine making it perform a task it wasn't designed for (sewing welt with a plain walking foot) was the main cause.

Thanks for all your help on this one. I'm sure I'll be back with other questions on upholstery in the future.

Cheers..........Barry.
07-15-2007 02:46 PM
Dusty82 Barry,

The best advice I ever got when I got my Juki LU-562 came from Dan. He told me to have it checked out by a professional, so that's what I did. They cleaned it, tuned it up, inspected everything for wear, adjusted the timing, and gave it a good lubrication for about $90 American. I dropped it off at the shop on Tuesday and picked it up that Friday. To me, it was more than money well spent.

Dan is also 100% correct when he says to throw away all of the thread that came with your machine and get some new thread - including pre-wound bobbin thread. I'm new to sewing as well, and I ignored that advice for about a month and just kept getting frustrated with thread breakage and tangles. I thought it was just the tension adjustments on my machine, but it turns out that wasn't the case. I picked up some #69 Nylon thread at the sewing machine repair shop and tried it out. Talk about the difference between night and day!

The thread, along with a new needle, made this old Juki of mine almost a real joy to use. Now all of my problems are with technique and not the machine itself. Practice is the only thing that'll fix that, and I'm still plugging away. I have so many pieces of scrap canvas, vinyl, and other materials that have been sewn together lying around my garage, it looks like an explosion at a quilting bee.

The secret is to use a new needle and new thread. Wind some bobbins from the same spool of thread you'll be using in the machine, adjust your upper and lower tensions while you sew on some scrap, then go for it. You really won't believe the difference it makes.

Keep practicing with it, and if you have any questions at all, you've come to the right place. Dan, ArmySniper, Horvath (Alan,) - heck, who am I kidding - all of the guys here are very friendly and extremely helpful. You couldn't find a better bunch of people IMHO.

Dusty
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