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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-01-2007 11:24 PM
MI2600 I've got a tool similar to that. Mine has a 5/8" nut brazed to the top of the handle so you can use a ratchet rather than wearing out your hands and arms.
11-01-2007 07:00 PM
Vortech 4.3
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-star
I have used that tool 50 or 60 times...to remove springs while the heads are still on the engine. I personally like it.

One problem with the stud mount/handle style is that in a standard car you run into all typs of things in your way, brake booster,etc.


If you buy that tool, for-go the recommended air hold to keep the valves in place. What i do is remove all the spark plugs. So the engine is easy to turn over by hand. Stick a piece of rope into the plug hole and slowley turn the engine over (by hand, not with the starter) untill the rope is compressed in the cylinder. (make sure your on the cycle where both valves are on the seats) then you can remove the retainers/ keepers/ springs with out the valves falling down, andas a bonus you have a soft cushin when you need to tap the top of the tool to break the keepers loose.

Keith

same here. thats a great tool. i don't use rope. i use a long spark plug wire, with one end cut off.
11-01-2007 04:28 PM
T-bucket23 I have used a similar tool to that for years, I think mine is a KD and I have used it on everything from a ford Pinto which was what I originally bought it for to chevy V8s. I have never had an issue. I have used both air and rope and both work well.
11-01-2007 11:14 AM
malc "If you buy that tool, for-go the recommended air hold to keep the valves in place. What i do is remove all the spark plugs. So the engine is easy to turn over by hand. Stick a piece of rope into the plug hole and slowley turn the engine over (by hand, not with the starter) untill the rope is compressed in the cylinder. (make sure your on the cycle where both valves are on the seats) then you can remove the retainers/ keepers/ springs with out the valves falling down, andas a bonus you have a soft cushin when you need to tap the top of the tool to break the keepers loose."

I do the rope trick, one time though it got knotted in the cylinder, boy did I have to pull hard.
11-01-2007 11:04 AM
leejoy
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-star
I have used that tool 50 or 60 times...to remove springs while the heads are still on the engine. I personally like it.

One problem with the stud mount/handle style is that in a standard car you run into all typs of things in your way, brake booster,etc.


If you buy that tool, for-go the recommended air hold to keep the valves in place. What i do is remove all the spark plugs. So the engine is easy to turn over by hand. Stick a piece of rope into the plug hole and slowley turn the engine over (by hand, not with the starter) untill the rope is compressed in the cylinder. (make sure your on the cycle where both valves are on the seats) then you can remove the retainers/ keepers/ springs with out the valves falling down, andas a bonus you have a soft cushin when you need to tap the top of the tool to break the keepers loose.

Keith
that's what I was thinking about the Summit type tool. May not fit on all springs - some situation may be tight. I've got a big block under my hood and not that much room. I may need both tools but want to buy only 1. I may just use it once in my lifetime. Seems like that other type will fit every spring regardless of space - but seems a bit more difficult and time consuming to use.
11-01-2007 10:30 AM
k-star
Quote:
Originally Posted by leejoy
anybody ever use one of these types of spring tools? Are they any good? I'm looking for the best most effective - easiest to use valve spring compressor tool for BBC heads - for using while the heads are installed on the motor.

Summit has another type of tool that uses the rocker arm stud as a brace, while a "fork" part of the tool compresses the spring. This tool seems easier and more compact but...........do will they work on my BBC iron heads while installed on the motor and in the vehicle?




I have used that tool 50 or 60 times...to remove springs while the heads are still on the engine. I personally like it.

One problem with the stud mount/handle style is that in a standard car you run into all typs of things in your way, brake booster,etc.


If you buy that tool, for-go the recommended air hold to keep the valves in place. What i do is remove all the spark plugs. So the engine is easy to turn over by hand. Stick a piece of rope into the plug hole and slowley turn the engine over (by hand, not with the starter) untill the rope is compressed in the cylinder. (make sure your on the cycle where both valves are on the seats) then you can remove the retainers/ keepers/ springs with out the valves falling down, andas a bonus you have a soft cushin when you need to tap the top of the tool to break the keepers loose.

Keith
11-01-2007 10:29 AM
malc I used a Summit valve spring compressor earlier this year to replace valve stem seals. As you can see there is plenty of space with the "foot" swung out of the way.
11-01-2007 10:21 AM
BBCMudbogger Typically a tool you use to remove springs from automotive heads looks like a big c-clamp see pic. The type you are showing doesnt have a way to grip the head with the jaws shown unless it hooks one of the bottom coils of the spring. You want one like the second pic that mounts to the stud. I have never seen one like your pic.
11-01-2007 09:19 AM
leejoy
..................

...............
11-01-2007 09:10 AM
leejoy
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCMudbogger
The one pictured probably won't work....get the other type that uses the rocker arm.
dear mudbogger dude:

thanks for your help. Please explain why it may not work so that I understand.

thanks

Lee
11-01-2007 09:06 AM
BBCMudbogger The one pictured probably won't work....get the other type that uses the rocker arm.
11-01-2007 08:51 AM
leejoy
Valve Spring Compressor Tool Help

anybody ever use one of these types of spring tools? Are they any good? I'm looking for the best most effective - easiest to use valve spring compressor tool for BBC heads - for using while the heads are installed on the motor.

Summit has another type of tool that uses the rocker arm stud as a brace, while a "fork" part of the tool compresses the spring. This tool seems easier and more compact but...........do will they work on my BBC iron heads while installed on the motor and in the vehicle?





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