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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-16-2007 08:21 AM
SuthnCustoms Just a thought that a freind of mine in Pennsylvania did with his shop to use for painting off and on...
He found an old home that was being tore down and got the old water/radiator heating system out of it for free if he got it all out in a certian time.
He put 4 radiators in each corner of his shop and the heating unit outside in an isolated and insulated housing for it.
For ventilation and keeping warm while ventilating fresh air he put a trap door right behind one of them that goes directly outside and filtered for when he is painting and ventilating.
No hot glow or ignition whatsoever and ive been in the shop in near zero weather outside and was sweating in a T-shirt.
I know you dont have time or money to do it right now Dewey but ,I thought i'd share it with all here for future ideas for heating a paint booth area...John
12-11-2007 04:19 PM
tyman00 Our booth for painting trailers has in-floor heating in it. That is the cat's meow. Plus when you are rolling around on a creeper and your shirt slides up you don't get a surprise when you slip of the creeper. Just warm concrete

In your shop, I wouldn't run the heater even if you were taking your air from the outside... just too scary. Seriously, I don't think you will have any problems if you turn your heater on 3-4 hours ahead of time. Your metal will be warm through and through and your air temp will be fine. It shouldn't cool off past 60 that quick. I am not sure what the proper range is for painting but maybe get your inside heat up to that point before you shoot. You might sweat at first but it will take longer to get to 60 degrees.
12-07-2007 09:46 AM
Kevin45
Quote:
One word to the wise. If you insist on using your shop, buy some sprayable paint mask, like they use in booths. Spray the floor. When you are done, it peels right up.
We used to use it in spray booths and I think it was called PeelRite or Peel-E-Z. I can't remember which. But that was a few years ago. If you use a BC/CC, the paint will cover things but it is more of a dust. The clear will definately leave an overspray. Single stage will and does cover everything. Get a roll of Sharkskin plastic. It's about $35.00 for a 12' x 400' roll. It is the thin painters plastic. Use it to cover what you don't want painted. Workbenches, etc. One roll will last you forever.

Kevin
11-30-2007 01:51 PM
Beenaway2long Thine spray mask may be procured through any one of thine local autorefinishing purveyors. A multitude of suppliers sit waiting by thier monitors just waiting for a googlesk type individual to find them, and purchase their wares.





(Can NOT think of the name of the magazine that comes to me. AutoRefinish Mart, or something like that? Comes quarterly. Several local supply houses tout it as better than sliced bread. )
11-29-2007 04:24 PM
Rob Keller What is this sprayable paint mask that YEE speakth of?




R
11-29-2007 12:20 PM
Beenaway2long After screwing up a paint job last winter because of the cold, I resigned myself to painting ONLY when it was 60 or higher. Makeup air is cold. It cools metal off FAST. Leads to irregular curing, IMO, and results in orangepeel.

Or , see if you can rent a booth.


I made such a mess of my shop, it made me sick. I masked everything off, wet the floors, you name it. I shot red and white single stage. Guess what color my floors were? And my tool boxes, and the walls behind the mask. That crud gets EVERYWHERE.

One word to the wise. If you insist on using your shop, buy some sprayable paint mask, like they use in booths. Spray the floor. When you are done, it peels right up.
11-22-2007 09:48 AM
Rob Keller [QUOTE=Henry Highrise]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Keller
I think you heater should be close to the ground.

Heat rises.

Your right Rob....heat rises....but fumes settle to the floor, thats why they recomend that any shop heater should be at least 18 inches above the floor. When I got out of the service I worked in a paint manufacturing facility. They had gas heaters like cboys mounted near the ceilings...the lights and light switches were explosion proof ( sealed air tight) . Any way those heaters ran while we were mixing solvents and resins making paint....never a problem. The way I do in my shop...I have infra red heaters....I warm things up good, turn off the heat , shoot the paint....wait awhile for the fumes to settle and then go back with the heat.

.................................................. .................................................. ....


If I ever get a shop.

The distance of my heater Give or take is ,91 to 94.5 million miles away!

I know but Its better to be a Smart Arse than a Dumb Arse!



My thoughts; Not being, a electrician is that Radiant Heat/ Infrared Heat would be the way to go .
Just be careful & aware of the switching devices .IE: Pilot lights & thermocouple switches.

Heating the objects in the area will also heat the air & create air flow circulation.

Any thing that MIGHT create a spark in a Volatile environment!


Even a Static spark .

Remember dust will explode given the right set of circumstances.

I wonder if sanding dust will burn if enuf piles up?

Henry 's way has to be the safest .





Rob
11-22-2007 05:03 AM
DanTwoLakes
Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
Do you see any problem with Dan's idea of running one or two baseboard type electric heaters during the actual mixing and shooting?
There should be nothing in those electric baseboard heaters to ignite the fumes. The heating element is encased in a ceramic tube and surrounded by aluminum fins. You should be able to have them going while you're mixing and painting. Check with an electrician, Dewey.
11-21-2007 09:17 PM
cboy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Highrise
....I warm things up good, turn off the heat , shoot the paint....wait awhile for the fumes to settle and then go back with the heat.
Do you see any problem with Dan's idea of running one or two baseboard type electric heaters during the actual mixing and shooting?
11-21-2007 05:35 PM
Henry Highrise [QUOTE=Rob Keller]I think you heater should be close to the ground.

Heat rises.

Your right Rob....heat rises....but fumes settle to the floor, thats why they recomend that any shop heater should be at least 18 inches above the floor. When I got out of the service I worked in a paint manufacturing facility. They had gas heaters like cboys mounted near the ceilings...the lights and light switches were explosion proof ( sealed air tight) . Any way those heaters ran while we were mixing solvents and resins making paint....never a problem. The way I do in my shop...I have infra red heaters....I warm things up good, turn off the heat , shoot the paint....wait awhile for the fumes to settle and then go back with the heat.

.................................................. .................................................. ....
11-21-2007 05:22 PM
cboy
Quote:
Originally Posted by OneMoreTime
I still think you guys should use infrared to get the metal warm as that is the critical part....
Sam,

One other option I have is that my Modine is programmable...I can set it up the night before I'm going to paint so it comes on a few hours before I intend to start so that not only should the shop be up to temperature but the metal as well. My big concern was KEEPING the place warm during the shoot since I have to be ventilating very cold air in from the outside. I'm also leaning towards Dan's idea because I have a nice use for those baseboard heaters when I don't need them in the shop.
11-21-2007 12:27 PM
OneMoreTime I still think you guys should use infrared to get the metal warm as that is the critical part....Just my opinion tho..

Sam
11-21-2007 12:15 PM
DanTwoLakes
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
There is no "glowing" element in a baseboard heater. The heat comes from a series of aluminum fins, so it can't ignite anything. They also have thermostats ( a few bucks extra) so they will only heat as much as you set them to. Rob's right, the heater should be at floor level, especially the electric baseboard heaters. They could be a couple inches off the ground to pick up cold air.
BTW: When the local hospital isn't using cboy's garage for outpatient surgery, it is a little messier than the first picture.
11-21-2007 07:00 AM
DanTwoLakes
Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
Geeze, I can't believe it. There was another paragraph on my original post that asked that very question (would an electric heater be safe) but I must have somehow clipped if off when I entered the post.

Anyhow, that be the perfect solution providing the heating element on the baseboard heater can not ignite any fumes.
There is no "glowing" element in a baseboard heater. The heat comes from a series of aluminum fins, so it can't ignite anything. They also have thermostats ( a few bucks extra) so they will only heat as much as you set them to. Rob's right, the heater should be at floor level, especially the electric baseboard heaters. They could be a couple inches off the ground to pick up cold air.
11-20-2007 09:55 PM
Rob Keller I think you heater should be close to the ground.

Heat rises.

Then you need a ceiling fan to circulate the heated & cold air

as far as painting in the dead cold .get it warm check it with a laser infrared thermometer & make sure that your intake air is pre heated.

do not leave any thing that can generate a spark on.

Those oil filled radiator heaters work real good at making radiant heat.

Do some experimenting before you go for the "money shot"



Good luck



Rob
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