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Thread: Tool to install crank sprocket on a SBC? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-03-2008 05:45 AM
540z For installation on a non-threaded crank snout, heat the gear as mentioned above, oil the crank snout and quickly tap into place using a piece of thick walled brass tube or even PVC tubing. Just make sure that there's nothing to interfere with the installation such as burrs or a screwed up key or keyway. Whenever I have a 283 or 327 crank re-done though, I have the crank nose tapped for a harmonic balancer bolt.
TR
07-03-2008 12:06 AM
CNC BLOCKS NE On our blower engines we build we use the Shaffer/Wesmar gear drives and they highly reccomend heating the gear and sliding it on as it does have a lot of interfearance as it takes a lot to get them off.
07-02-2008 07:40 PM
sam-missle i have seen more than a few crank gears split because of tapping them on. as carl said heat it up and slide it on.

sam-missle
07-02-2008 02:25 PM
CNC BLOCKS NE
Quote:
Originally Posted by engineczar
Seeing as I've never built a 283 or a 327 I wouldn't know so I guess until I do then I can't call myself an engine builder.
You must be an engine assembler LOL!!!!!!
07-02-2008 10:46 AM
engineczar
Quote:
Originally Posted by CNC BLOCKS NE
How does that work on a 283 or 327 crank that has no threads for the installer?

Seeing as I've never built a 283 or a 327 I wouldn't know so I guess until I do then I can't call myself an engine builder.
07-02-2008 09:42 AM
SSedan64
Quote:
Originally Posted by v8hed
Has anyone got a pic of this set-up, just so I'm clear? Is there any danger of stripping the crank snout threads by doing this?

Thanks.
You shouldn't have any problems with stripping threads with this method.
07-02-2008 08:30 AM
Stroke Dunno about all that hammerin' and tappin' stuff. Contrary to popular belief, there is a tool made just for the task you describe. Of course, like CNC said about fitment and no thread snouts. Looks like this...
07-02-2008 06:38 AM
v8hed
Quote:
Originally Posted by engineczar
This is almost exactly the method I use except I don't heat anything. What I use is a piece of square tubing that has an inside dimension just larger than the snout diameter (1.25) and long enough to ensure the gear is seated. The ends of the tubing are milled square. I then press it on with my balancer installer. By using square tubing I find that there's clearance for the key and it still contacts the gear and my installation tool.
Has anyone got a pic of this set-up, just so I'm clear? Is there any danger of stripping the crank snout threads by doing this?

Thanks.
07-02-2008 06:38 AM
CNC BLOCKS NE
Quote:
Originally Posted by engineczar
This is almost exactly the method I use except I don't heat anything. What I use is a piece of square tubing that has an inside dimension just larger than the snout diameter (1.25) and long enough to ensure the gear is seated. The ends of the tubing are milled square. I then press it on with my balancer installer. By using square tubing I find that there's clearance for the key and it still contacts the gear and my installation tool.
How does that work on a 283 or 327 crank that has no threads for the installer?
07-02-2008 06:20 AM
engineczar
Quote:
Originally Posted by 540z
Do you have a harmonic balancer (thrust bearing type) installation tool? The type that threads into the bolt threads in the crankshaft? If so, cut yourself a piece of 1 1/4" ID pipe about 2 1/2" long to work as a spacer. Use the pipe in conjunction with the balancer tool.

1. Just warm up the crank gear in the oven (about 300 degrees for about 20 minutes).
2. Grab it with your gloved hand, line it up with the keyway and slide the gear, chamfered side first, onto the pre-oiled crankshaft nose.
3. Place the pipe between the thrust washer of the balancer tool and the gear, quickly thread the balancer tool into the crank nose, and turn the nut against the thrust washer, which pushes on the pipe and in turn pushes the pipe against the crank gear.
I hope this helps,
TR
This is almost exactly the method I use except I don't heat anything. What I use is a piece of square tubing that has an inside dimension just larger than the snout diameter (1.25) and long enough to ensure the gear is seated. The ends of the tubing are milled square. I then press it on with my balancer installer. By using square tubing I find that there's clearance for the key and it still contacts the gear and my installation tool.
07-01-2008 08:38 PM
540z Do you have a harmonic balancer (thrust bearing type) installation tool? The type that threads into the bolt threads in the crankshaft? If so, cut yourself a piece of 1 1/4" ID pipe about 2 1/2" long to work as a spacer. Use the pipe in conjunction with the balancer tool.

1. Just warm up the crank gear in the oven (about 300 degrees for about 20 minutes).
2. Grab it with your gloved hand, line it up with the keyway and slide the gear, chamfered side first, onto the pre-oiled crankshaft nose.
3. Place the pipe between the thrust washer of the balancer tool and the gear, quickly thread the balancer tool into the crank nose, and turn the nut against the thrust washer, which pushes on the pipe and in turn pushes the pipe against the crank gear.
I hope this helps,
TR
06-30-2008 02:43 AM
v8hed Thanks guys... I'll use the gear puller to get the old gear off and I'll try tapping the new gear on. If that doesn't work, I'll heat with a blowtorch and install with oven mitt
06-29-2008 11:37 PM
sbchevfreak I do the same as CNC, but I use a hot plate with a mesh screen on it to get more even heat. A few minutes on this, flip once, and the same on that side, and it will slide on without effort.
06-29-2008 09:14 PM
1drwgn its easier to do with a large deep socket to get even pressure around gear then give it the ol adjusting tool.
06-29-2008 08:26 PM
speedydeedy I know all are different but in general you don't have to beat them on.
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