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Coachfhs 10-24-2011 01:19 PM

Ohio
 
4 Attachment(s)
Anyone know of any good T Bucket wizzards in Southern Ohio. I want to put disc brakes on the front but some tell me I may have to put entire new axle etc on....way out of my league I am thinking.
Coach

cucumber1949 10-24-2011 02:34 PM

Purchase a brake kit that includes spindles with kingpins that match the diameter of the kingpin bosses of your axle, and check that the camber with those new spindles will be okay for your setup. I used a Wilwood kit on my T.

However, in my opinion disk brakes used on the narrow tired wire wheels will not net you much as they may easily lock up the fronts due to lack of tread contact, especially in a panic stop - result is no steering while locked up. You might want to change out the front wheels and tires to something that will put more tread on the front. You may also want to consider plumbing in a proportioning valve into your system to help adjust the front/rear bias.

dalesy 10-24-2011 03:55 PM

Something else, too.......in addition to those comments above......since you've got the front end stretched out, you've got less weight on those front tires. That could also compound your lock-up problem.

Coachfhs 10-24-2011 05:18 PM

Too old
 
I am beginning to think I am too old to learn this stuff. If by camber you mean the tilt of the king pins...i did notice they arent straight up and down...this really looses me. Do you all think it is "stretched out" to much to even bother. I guess I could change the wheels and tires too. I bought it two months ago and fell in love with the way it is longer than most...almost like an old rail job in the 60s. The motor cycle type wheels and tires look sort of old school and that was a plus to me but now I am beginning to wonder.
Coach :(

cucumber1949 10-24-2011 06:24 PM

The camber on most of these straight axles is about what you have now (by looking at the picture). This is about the normal camber, and the spindles for these straight axle cars take that angle into account. This angle is there to facilitate the 'return to center' function of steering among other things. It should be fairly simple to measure the angle of camber that your axle uses, and then make sure the replacement spindles you buy will be proper for that axle. As a last resort the axle can be bent to achieve another angle - not very practical.

I can't see all the details in your pictures, but right now I don't believe you'll need to replace the axle.

Here is the job as I see it now, either via pictures or surmising those details I can't see:

- Replace spindles with something common like early Ford ('37-'41) or Chev spindles, be sure the kingpin bosses are the same as your current axle kingpin bores. These spindles will most likely have to have new steering arms as well as it looks like your current arms are forged on the old spindles. Superbell is one source I can think of.

- Install a disk brake kit on these spindles. Reconnect the steering link (tie bar).

- Plum a line from your master cylinder to the front brakes, consider replacing your master cylinder with a dual chamber MC for safety. If you are running drum brakes on the back you should use a disk/drum MC. Plum in a proportioning valve into the system. Bleed system.

- Install new wheels and tires. Align front end using the 'String Fling' technique (google) if you have no other tools. Carefully begin testing it all.

If you want to, it really is easy to replace the axle. The pictures tell me that you have radius rod and spring shackles, most other axles use these as well. It also looks like your current axle has no drop. A dropped axle makes larger wheels and tires look better in my opinion. Again, Superbell has lots of options on axles. The good thing about replacing the axle is that you can be sure of getting compatible spindles and kingpins/shims.

This would make a good mid-winter project.

Good luck to you.

dalesy 10-25-2011 07:39 AM

Since 'way back', guys have been building these t-buckets, many of them reminiscent of the old drag cars...and a good many of them had only rear brakes.

While this is cool and racy looking, despite the light weight, they don't stop as well as they could.You could use the guidelines above, possibly for the best results. Or I've seen these cars, where rodders have adapted a set of go-kart disc brakes to the front wheels. I don't know what part of Ohio you're from, but I spent most of my life around Cincinnati, so I know you're not going to be driving this thing over the winter. Take advantage of the 'time off', do some homework, and get it ready for next spring.

One thing to keep in mind, is that this type of setup is geared with an eye toward the dragstrip......straight line, no traffic, plenty of room to stop. You don't have that on the street.

In either scenario, you've got some work to do. If you're going to drive it, it needs to be safe. Don't ever consider yourself too old, especially to have a little fun with a hot rod. I'm 66, and looking for one myself.

There's a wealth of information online, and many manufacturers are quite willing to offer you all the technical assistance you'll need. Good luck!

Coachfhs 10-25-2011 08:22 AM

Thanks
 
Thanks guys...i have a lot of work and home work to do. I had it out this morning ....went to eat breakfast with my other retired buddies...people kept comming up and asking about it ...couldnt hardly eat but I like it. Nothing around like this one. My buddy and I just about froze to death forty degrees and the fog. Lovin it and retirement but miss the kids.
Coach


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